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Thread: Help!!!!!!!!!!!!

  1. #1
    Senior Member Dreaming's Avatar
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    Help!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I'm new to machine quilting, and I've been practicing my meandering for awhile with quilting thread. Well I finally decided to go ahead and quilt my wall hanging and I am using monofiliment. Well, my thread broke. What does a person do when your thread breaks? And on top of that when I turned it over I found a threads nest. That had happen awhile before the thread broke. The thread nest happened then the stitches went back to normal, then the top thread broke awhile later. What caused that? I never had any problems with the quilting thread, is it the monofiliment? Is there a certain way you have to set up your machine for the monofiliment and if so, what is it. I would really appreciate any help you could give me.

  2. #2
    Super Member Chasing Hawk's Avatar
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    First check your bobbin area for any lint. Especially the bobbin holder itself sometimes a tiny piece of lint gets in there and messes everything up. Then check the tension both top and bottom. Monofliment is kinda stretchy, it has some give to it like fishing line. Make sure the needle is sharp.

    I just seen your post count.....666..........lol..........keep your cooties on your side of the sewing room...LOL
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  3. #3
    Power Poster RedGarnet222's Avatar
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    I can't help you with the monofiliment thread problem because I don't use it on cotton quilts. I am afraid that the thread will melt or break the threads of the cotton fabric. I use a good cotton thread for meandering. Depending on how much quilting there will be on the quilt is how thick the thread should or should not be. I don't do a lot of tightly quilted quilts, I mostly use a nice king tut or even connecting threads cotton thread in both bobbin and as the top thread. Again it depends on the quilt. A charity quilt is just fine with the connecting threads cotton thread and is miles cheaper to use. I have heard not to use the quilting thread in the machine. So I don't.

    Long ago when I used to use the monofiliment, I used a thread additive onto the thread and also a netting over the thread so it would come off the cone right. Oh and use a specialty needle made for this type thread.

    I hope this helps you some. I know it is all a learning curve starting out, so don't be too hard on yourself.
    Last edited by RedGarnet222; 02-25-2013 at 02:37 PM.
    RedGarnet222

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  4. #4
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Is it nylon monofilament? If so, you do have to make some changes to tension. Was your practice piece not using monofilament? You really need to work out the tension on a test piece using the same thread you want to use on your quilt.

    Nylon monofilament thread up above requires a lowered tension setting. (I think this applies also to polyester monofilament.) This is because nylon monofilament thread stretches. You lower the tension so it doesn't stretch so much when it is going through the needle. Stretching causes the thread to break.

    Did you bring up the bobbin thread to the top at the beginning of your stitching line? And hold both threads when you started? That prevents a thread nest at the beginning.

    Are you using monofilament in the bobbin? At least for nylon monofilament, it is important not to stretch the thread when winding the bobbin. The bobbin should be wound relatively slowly and carefully. Also, it's important not to overfill the bobbin; you want to stop when it is about 3/4ths full. This is because monofilament stretching can cause distortion in the bobbin. Plastic bobbins are more likely to distort than metal bobbins.

    What brand is your monofilament thread? Not all monofilament threads are good for quilting.

  5. #5
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    It seems every sewing machine is different in it's likes and dislikes for mono thread. I have the problem on two different brands of machines. After adjusting and readjusting I have decided I need to go for professional help and will consult the sewing machine dealer. I would suggest the same for you if your dealer is availabe. If not, then email the machine manufacturer and ask the question. There is good info on superior threads web site and am sure the other thread manufacturers have the same kind of info. We all have different problems with mono thread and it is better for you to go to your machine manufacturer for advice.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Dreaming's Avatar
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    I'm useing YLI and it is nylon. Unfortunately, I did wind it till it was full and I did wind it fast.

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    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Ah, the dreaded monofilament. Try using a thread net or even two. I quit using it because it was such a major hassle and drove me to drink (like I needed an excuse lol). If you're using it because you don't want the quilting to show, try a finer thread, like Bottom Line, in a neutral color instead. I've been happy with my results using BL.

  8. #8
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    I do not use monofilament in the bobbin. It is very difficult too work with in free motion quilting. I never use it in a quilt that is to be used. Only wall hangings. The research is not in as to how it with stands time.

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    Are you by any chance using a plastic bobbin? the problem with any stretchy thread is that when winding the bobbin, it stretches as it's wound. Once the winding is complete - the thread tries to return to normal and in doing this, puts pressure on the core of the bobbin. If you used a plastic bobbin, the pressure of the thread can distort the bobbin center and it won't work properly....this can easily cause tension problems. If you used a plastic bobbin, either try a metal one, or wind another bobbin on a slow speed in order to reduce the amount of stretching.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dreaming View Post
    I'm useing YLI and it is nylon. Unfortunately, I did wind it till it was full and I did wind it fast.
    Kate

  10. #10
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dreaming View Post
    I'm useing YLI and it is nylon. Unfortunately, I did wind it till it was full and I did wind it fast.
    YLI nylon is what I use for a monofilament thread. My Bernina handles it well in both top and bobbin, but I do all those things I mentioned in the previous post. I also use a thread net over the cone. Try winding a new bobbin and reducing the upper tension to half what is normal (mine runs well at a 2 or 3 setting).

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    Personally, I won't use monofilament thread, I don't know if the thread was the reason for your problem though.

  12. #12
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    A sharp point, or Microtex needle is a good choice for invisible thread. If you are looking for a machine needle that is good for quilting with monofilament, try a 60/8 needle for best results. The sharp tip gets it into and out of fabric easily.
    Always look to the needle type for the type of thread you are using.....several websites recommend the 60/8 needle for monofilament thread.
    Read more: What Size of Needles to Use With Invisible Thread | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_8716458_siz...#ixzz2M6wurYjL

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    Help....I just used a mono-poly in both top and bottom threads in a quilt(comfort quilt for a child with CF) that is to be used. Is this not a good thing?? Per a suggestion from a tutorial. (to use the same thread in the top and bottom)
    I bought the thread it at a LQS. "As it hides a multitude of sins" I used it for SID only. I am confused...
    I did have problems with breakage until I changed to a smaller needle (75/11).

  14. #14
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    I use monofilament in the top only with a fine thread like Aurifil in the bobbin. Some machines will state in the manual do not use monofilament in the bobbin. I also use a Microtex Sharp.

  15. #15
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jo Anne B. View Post
    Help....I just used a mono-poly in both top and bottom threads in a quilt(comfort quilt for a child with CF) that is to be used. Is this not a good thing?? Per a suggestion from a tutorial. (to use the same thread in the top and bottom)
    I bought the thread it at a LQS. "As it hides a multitude of sins" I used it for SID only. I am confused...
    I did have problems with breakage until I changed to a smaller needle (75/11).
    The issue with monofilament thread in baby quilts is -- especially if some of the stitches are large or loose -- that the thread can get tangled around a baby's finger or toe and cut off circulation. This is why it is not recommended for baby quilts. For an older child and adults that is not really a problem, as they can either take care of it themselves or show the problem to someone who can. This is a rare problem with monofilament, but it has occurred.

    This is somewhat less of a problem with SID since the stitches are likely to be even; it's more of a problem with FMQ.
    For the child with CF, you may need to decide whether or not the child can show this problem to an adult. If so, I would say you are okay.

  16. #16
    Super Member ArtsyOne's Avatar
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    I use monofilament a lot, and I have it in both the bobbin and the top spool. Before I switched to a special "metallics/monofilament" needle I had the same problem. As for the issue of getting caught around a baby's toe or finger, make sure to double-lock the beginning and end of each stitching session and make sure that your stitches are all the length that you have selected with no loooong stitches that can be raised up.
    A fabric stash is always missing that one fabric needed to finish the quilt on which you're working.

  17. #17
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    I was taught to hand wind my bobbin with monofilament thread and that seems to work. It does take time to do it.

  18. #18
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    suzyquilter

    Quote Originally Posted by Dreaming View Post
    I'm new to machine quilting, and I've been practicing my meandering for awhile with quilting thread. Well I finally decided to go ahead and quilt my wall hanging and I am using monofiliment. Well, my thread broke. What does a person do when your thread breaks? And on top of that when I turned it over I found a threads nest. That had happen awhile before the thread broke. The thread nest happened then the stitches went back to normal, then the top thread broke awhile later. What caused that? I never had any problems with the quilting thread, is it the monofiliment? Is there a certain way you have to set up your machine for the monofiliment and if so, what is it. I would really appreciate any help you could give me.
    Are you using a metallic or topstitch needle? That plus loosing the tension a little should help.

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