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Help!!!!!!!!!!!!

Help!!!!!!!!!!!!

Old 02-25-2013, 02:17 PM
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I'm new to machine quilting, and I've been practicing my meandering for awhile with quilting thread. Well I finally decided to go ahead and quilt my wall hanging and I am using monofiliment. Well, my thread broke. What does a person do when your thread breaks? And on top of that when I turned it over I found a threads nest. That had happen awhile before the thread broke. The thread nest happened then the stitches went back to normal, then the top thread broke awhile later. What caused that? I never had any problems with the quilting thread, is it the monofiliment? Is there a certain way you have to set up your machine for the monofiliment and if so, what is it. I would really appreciate any help you could give me.
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Old 02-25-2013, 02:24 PM
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First check your bobbin area for any lint. Especially the bobbin holder itself sometimes a tiny piece of lint gets in there and messes everything up. Then check the tension both top and bottom. Monofliment is kinda stretchy, it has some give to it like fishing line. Make sure the needle is sharp.

I just seen your post count.....666..........lol..........keep your cooties on your side of the sewing room...LOL
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Old 02-25-2013, 02:28 PM
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I can't help you with the monofiliment thread problem because I don't use it on cotton quilts. I am afraid that the thread will melt or break the threads of the cotton fabric. I use a good cotton thread for meandering. Depending on how much quilting there will be on the quilt is how thick the thread should or should not be. I don't do a lot of tightly quilted quilts, I mostly use a nice king tut or even connecting threads cotton thread in both bobbin and as the top thread. Again it depends on the quilt. A charity quilt is just fine with the connecting threads cotton thread and is miles cheaper to use. I have heard not to use the quilting thread in the machine. So I don't.

Long ago when I used to use the monofiliment, I used a thread additive onto the thread and also a netting over the thread so it would come off the cone right. Oh and use a specialty needle made for this type thread.

I hope this helps you some. I know it is all a learning curve starting out, so don't be too hard on yourself.

Last edited by RedGarnet222; 02-25-2013 at 02:37 PM.
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Old 02-25-2013, 02:39 PM
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Is it nylon monofilament? If so, you do have to make some changes to tension. Was your practice piece not using monofilament? You really need to work out the tension on a test piece using the same thread you want to use on your quilt.

Nylon monofilament thread up above requires a lowered tension setting. (I think this applies also to polyester monofilament.) This is because nylon monofilament thread stretches. You lower the tension so it doesn't stretch so much when it is going through the needle. Stretching causes the thread to break.

Did you bring up the bobbin thread to the top at the beginning of your stitching line? And hold both threads when you started? That prevents a thread nest at the beginning.

Are you using monofilament in the bobbin? At least for nylon monofilament, it is important not to stretch the thread when winding the bobbin. The bobbin should be wound relatively slowly and carefully. Also, it's important not to overfill the bobbin; you want to stop when it is about 3/4ths full. This is because monofilament stretching can cause distortion in the bobbin. Plastic bobbins are more likely to distort than metal bobbins.

What brand is your monofilament thread? Not all monofilament threads are good for quilting.
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Old 02-25-2013, 02:48 PM
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It seems every sewing machine is different in it's likes and dislikes for mono thread. I have the problem on two different brands of machines. After adjusting and readjusting I have decided I need to go for professional help and will consult the sewing machine dealer. I would suggest the same for you if your dealer is availabe. If not, then email the machine manufacturer and ask the question. There is good info on superior threads web site and am sure the other thread manufacturers have the same kind of info. We all have different problems with mono thread and it is better for you to go to your machine manufacturer for advice.
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Old 02-25-2013, 02:53 PM
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I'm useing YLI and it is nylon. Unfortunately, I did wind it till it was full and I did wind it fast.
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Old 02-25-2013, 02:55 PM
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Ah, the dreaded monofilament. Try using a thread net or even two. I quit using it because it was such a major hassle and drove me to drink (like I needed an excuse lol). If you're using it because you don't want the quilting to show, try a finer thread, like Bottom Line, in a neutral color instead. I've been happy with my results using BL.
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Old 02-25-2013, 04:41 PM
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I do not use monofilament in the bobbin. It is very difficult too work with in free motion quilting. I never use it in a quilt that is to be used. Only wall hangings. The research is not in as to how it with stands time.
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Old 02-25-2013, 05:02 PM
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Are you by any chance using a plastic bobbin? the problem with any stretchy thread is that when winding the bobbin, it stretches as it's wound. Once the winding is complete - the thread tries to return to normal and in doing this, puts pressure on the core of the bobbin. If you used a plastic bobbin, the pressure of the thread can distort the bobbin center and it won't work properly....this can easily cause tension problems. If you used a plastic bobbin, either try a metal one, or wind another bobbin on a slow speed in order to reduce the amount of stretching.

Originally Posted by Dreaming View Post
I'm useing YLI and it is nylon. Unfortunately, I did wind it till it was full and I did wind it fast.
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Old 02-25-2013, 05:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Dreaming View Post
I'm useing YLI and it is nylon. Unfortunately, I did wind it till it was full and I did wind it fast.
YLI nylon is what I use for a monofilament thread. My Bernina handles it well in both top and bobbin, but I do all those things I mentioned in the previous post. I also use a thread net over the cone. Try winding a new bobbin and reducing the upper tension to half what is normal (mine runs well at a 2 or 3 setting).
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