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Thread: Homemade basting spray

  1. #1
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    Homemade basting spray

    Has anyone here ever used hairspray or starch or watered down school glue to baste their quilt? Was it successfull? What changes would you make?

  2. #2
    Senior Member GemState's Avatar
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    I've been going to try watered down Elmer's washable school glue but haven't gotten around to it. Anxious to hear if anyone else has tried it and what the results were.

  3. #3
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    There are a few threads about using Elmer's for basting. Check out this thread:
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/main-f1...o-t196786.html

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the link
    http://www.oregonquilting.net
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  5. #5
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    Try this link. Jenniky is leading a QAYG with a lot of info about quilters who are experimenting with and have successfully used Elmer's washable school glue in their quilting.

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/quiltin...e-t196192.html

    Linda

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    I use Elmer's Glue to do my binding. Works great!

  7. #7
    Super Member Yarn or Fabric's Avatar
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    Very interesting! I'm going to be making some table runners in the not so distant future... I think I'll give the Elmer's a try. I do like spray basting but the stuff is quite expensive especially when you can pick up a thing of glue for a quarter, dime or even a penny right now with back to school specials Maybe I'll do a comparison of techniques and see how they all compare

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    Nancy Zieman uses little snips of wonder under. I have used it on small projects. I have not heard of watering down glue...sounds interesting. Thanks for the link.

  9. #9
    Junior Member SandyQuilter's Avatar
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    I have read many comments about starch use. I have never used it in over 30 years of quilting and my quilts are accurate. I don't believe that early quilters used it either. After all, heating a heavy iron made of iron on a stove that required stoking would be a terrible job. Early quilters could made an accurate Mariner's Compass without starch. They could also make inaccurate ones just like today. Certainly, some of our tools make our accuracy easier and I so use rotary cutting and wonderful rulers.

    However, I cringe to think that new quilters read comments about needing to use starch in order to have an accurate quilt. That is simply not true.

    What does make for machine assembly accuracy is accurate templates, cutting and sewing slow enough in order to control the fabric as it goes under the presser foot of the sewing machine. When hand sewing, it requires accurate templates, careful fabric marking, and stitching on both patches marked sewing lines.
    And for either machine or hand sewing, pressing gently, not ironing with vigor is crucial.

    I apologize if I've ruffled anyone's feathers, however, I've bitten my tongue long enough. And I've tried starching. It took too long and didn't add anything to my quilting accuracy, I simply don't see the point.
    SandyQuilter

  10. #10
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    I tend to agree, I really don't starch either.....But I do think it is a case of "to each their own"....what works for one may not work for another......and the most important rule in quilting (IMHO) there are NO rules.
    Yes that is a real picture of my hometown Temecula, California. We feature premiere Wineries, World Class Golf Courses, Pechanga Indian Casino and Hot Air Balloons

  11. #11
    Junior Member SandyQuilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deborahlees View Post
    I tend to agree, I really don't starch either.....But I do think it is a case of "to each their own"....what works for one may not work for another......and the most important rule in quilting (IMHO) there are NO rules.
    Oh, Deborahlees, just realized that I was doing the winery tour with my kids in June. They live in Murrieta. And went to a quilt store. Next time, will give you a heads up and we can meet if our schedules permit.
    SandyQuilter

  12. #12
    Senior Member Tashana's Avatar
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    Somebody has mentioned that Elmer's School Glue is not really glue but starch and that's why it washes out of our quilts that nicely. I do not know if that is true or not, but I have a gallon of Elmers and I use it for many things besides my kids crafts and quilting. Did you know that you can use it instead of cracknel compound to make cracled finish on furniture? I did on two tables and they turned out great.
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  13. #13
    Super Member JeanieG's Avatar
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    Below is a link to Sharon Schamber's Video on Bind a Quilt - she uses Elmers School Glue and heat sets it with her iron. I've been using this system for around 2 years. Works great!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2hWQ5-ZccE
    "You have enough quilts made when your soul is filled, your creativity satisfied and your fingers just won't work anymore."

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by SandyQuilter View Post
    I have read many comments about starch use. I have never used it in over 30 years of quilting and my quilts are accurate. I don't believe that early quilters used it either. After all, heating a heavy iron made of iron on a stove that required stoking would be a terrible job. Early quilters could made an accurate Mariner's Compass without starch. They could also make inaccurate ones just like today. Certainly, some of our tools make our accuracy easier and I so use rotary cutting and wonderful rulers.

    However, I cringe to think that new quilters read comments about needing to use starch in order to have an accurate quilt. That is simply not true.

    What does make for machine assembly accuracy is accurate templates, cutting and sewing slow enough in order to control the fabric as it goes under the presser foot of the sewing machine. When hand sewing, it requires accurate templates, careful fabric marking, and stitching on both patches marked sewing lines.
    And for either machine or hand sewing, pressing gently, not ironing with vigor is crucial.

    I apologize if I've ruffled anyone's feathers, however, I've bitten my tongue long enough. And I've tried starching. It took too long and didn't add anything to my quilting accuracy, I simply don't see the point.
    SandyQuilter
    I certainly agree with everything you have said. No one used starch years ago, and it doesn't really make any difference with accuracy. What I think the question was in using starch or glue for basting a quilt.
    I have not tried starch as I can't imagine that it would stick the sandwich together well enough for quilting.
    However, I do use starch when I'm piecing, and specifically something that will be cut/sewn on the bias. While it doesn't necessarily do much for the accuracy, it does tend to keep the bias cut edge from becoming distorted.
    I guess in the long run that could affect the accuracy or at the very least the distortion of all the parts.

    I figure I need all the help I can get. You mentioned sewing slow enough - well that is a problem I have. I'm working on it, but still tend to get in a hurry.

  15. #15
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
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    I use Roxanne's Glue-Baste-It and have used washable, acid free glue sticks for basting. I have also spray basted -- but it is hard to do inside with the smell. I plan to use Elmers school glue once I empty the Roxanne's bottle since it is much cheaper. Don't know if I have to thin it down or not.

    I do starch when I have washed the fabric, but if I do not wash it then the sizing is usually stiff enough.
    QuiltnLady1

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  16. #16
    Senior Member kwilter's Avatar
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    Oh, SandyQuilter ---- I have tons of relatives in Murrietta! I hardly ever get to visit with them except on Facebook and I miss hugging them. Where was the quilt store and was it any good?

  17. #17
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    I think the original poster was referring to stach as an alternative to basting spray for layering the quilt prior to quilting, not for piecing. I took an applique class many years ago and one of the methods was to use glue sticks to hold the turned under edges in place before hand stitching. I like the watered down Elmer's idea as the basting spray smells awful.

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