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Thread: Hoping someone can help me with a little confusion...

  1. #26
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    Wow!! Thank you for asking this question. Just got a new machine and walking foot. Never even thought to check. You may have saved me a lot of grief.

  2. #27
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    I found this so interesting. I can reverse stitch on both my Elna's and my New Home with my walking foot regardless of the stitch length and it never occured to me that you couldn't on some machines. Hmmm . . . learn something new every single day! :D

  3. #28
    Super Member Homemother's Avatar
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    Someone on the board shared this link for a boarder that you can sew completely on the machine. I'm going to try it. It takes a little more fabric, but I think it will make a nice finish!

    http://tlcstitches.blogspot.com/2010...-tutorial.html

  4. #29
    Junior Member Lena1952's Avatar
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    I am confused. You need confusion or you are confused? If you require confusion, I have plenty to spare!! Seriously, on your question, I would reduce the stitch length at the beginning and end of each seam if my walking foot did not permit back stitching. AS for the binding technique, you can probably find a demo online. Try several methods and see which one you like best. I have tried them all and still like sewing double fold binding to the front, folding it to the back and hand stitching to finish.

  5. #30
    Super Member quiltmaker's Avatar
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    This sure is interesting as I can backstitch with my IDT on my Pfaff and also on the walking foot for my Juki and vintage machines.....never had a problem whatsoever. I wonder if it is just certain walking feet that don't have the capablility to backstitch? Strange but interesting and I've never had to change the stitch length either. :roll:

    I have also machine stitched on both sides of my quilt first to the back and then fold over to the front without any problems either....probably more of a personal preference as we quilters seem to have a lot of them. :-D

  6. #31
    Senior Member redbugsullivan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cutebuns
    on the binding, if I am machining both sides I sew it to the back fold it to the front and sew it down, if I am hand sewing one, I sew it to the front and fold it to the back and hand sew it down, depends on the quilt and what it is being used for to what I do.
    Ditto. I love to use my leaf pattern when machine binding the front. Admittedly, I do a large basting stitch first to ensure everything matches up for both sides to look good. This type of method makes for a very secure binding that wears well and looks good. I think it would be even more attractive if a varigated green were used as the top and/or bottom thread.

  7. #32
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Don't worry if the stitches are secured by a row of stitches going over the top or perpendicular to it as they will be secure within the seam. I never back stitch on any of my quilts and they are fine.Anything exposed can be secured by either starting with smaller stitches or hand threading them through the layers of the quilt just as you do for hand quilting.

  8. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by oatw13
    I cannot reverse with my walking foot because of the gears inside of it. Instead, you can use locking stitches. If your machine doesn't have a locking stitch setting, just set the stitch length to zero and sew several stitches in the same place. This creates a knot that holds the thread in place. When you are ready to move forward, just reset the stitch length. When you get to the end, repeat the locking stitches in the same way.
    I have found this to be the best way to lock stitch with a walking foot. Work really well

  9. #34
    Senior Member Jo Belmont's Avatar
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    It has never occurred to me not to backstitch with my walking foot - do it all the time. Decor stitches too and it just performs beautifully.

    Sometimes when straight stitching, instead of doing a backstitch, I ever so gently hold back on the fabric as it enters the stitch area, causing two or three stitches to be made in the same or nearly the same place. Has the same effect as a locking stitch without the normal "buildup" from the programmed six-stitch lock. I've never had a seam let go that has been secured like this, nor has my fabric ever stretched from the very gentle "hold-back."

    BTW I use a Kenmore machine and the walking foot available through Sears. I've had it for years and never had a problem with it. I do keep it cleaned and occasionally oiled on its moving parts.

  10. #35
    Junior Member Mary L Booth's Avatar
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    When you start put your stitch on 0 or 1 take 3 stitch and put it back where you sew, it works.

  11. #36
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    I would not use a walking foot to piece blocks, use a regular foot & a 2 or 2.5 stitch length then seams do not come apart.
    There are web sites that show you howo to sew binding on with a machine & it works fine.

  12. #37

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    I have a husqvarna viking machine. I use the interchangeable dual feed foot walking foot. There is no problem going backwards with this foot and it works like a charm! ~ Like many have posted, it depends on the type of machine you have on what your foot attachment allows you to do.

  13. #38
    Super Member jgriinke's Avatar
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    Your quilt will not fall apart because you didn't back stitch at the end of a seam. With quilting, almost all the time, you stitch over that part again. I have been quilting for about 17 years and have never backstitched and haven't had one quilt fall apart because of it.
    You must be someone who has always stitched clothing, and then have moved on to quilts. Backstitching is what you do with clothing consturction, not quilts. You can, but if it's not necessary, why spend the extra time.
    That's just my opinion.
    Think of us in the northern part of Wisconsin today - we are expecting anywhere from 6 to 14 inches of snow in the next 24 hours.........I thought it was spring???

  14. #39
    Junior Member SandyQuilter's Avatar
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    Machine binding? Doesn't matter whether you sew to the front or back first. The object is to have it applied smooth and even. The problem with machine binding the folded over edge is having the machine stitching even and not catching the binding in an uneven line. That's why I machine stitch the binding to the back (my choice) and fold it to the front and hand stitch.

    Sandy

  15. #40
    Super Member Quilter7x's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LUANNH
    I backsitch on mt 14 yr old New Home Memory Craft 9000 while using the walking foot all the time and never had a problem with my machine. Maybe it's the newer machines, I had not ever heard this before. Worth checking with your local dealer for his advice on your machine. JMHO
    I have the same machine and think nothing of back stitching on it. Haven't had a problem yet. I didn't even know you couldn't back stitch on some machines, so I was glad to read about this.

    As for binding, I sew mine onto the front, then pin it around to the back and use a decorative stitch on top, which catches the binding on the bottom. Using a decorative stitch will give a strong stitching finish to the binding.

  16. #41
    Super Member patdesign's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mariposa
    I sew my bindings all by machine. I sew it to the back first, then bring it over to the front and top stitch close to the edge. Works great for me, and saves bunches of time!
    Exactly what I do! Works Great! :-D

  17. #42
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    when reversing is not what you want to do you only need to start and stop stitching with a few small stitches in place (locking stitches) i am assuming you were using the walking foot to quilt the quilt? if that's the case...why would you think it would fall apart? the piecing is what will hold it all together.
    usually with machine stitching you do not have to worry about a locking stitch if the seam will be crossed by another seam.
    that (secures) the previous seam.
    lots of people machine attach their bindings...do a tutorial search on machine binding, you will find plenty of tutorials, help for that part. once the quilt is bound go ahead and wash/dry it...you will find it's going to be just fine :thumbup:

  18. #43
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    I reverse stitch with my walking foot, just slow and easy, never had a problem.

  19. #44
    Senior Member cpfrog's Avatar
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    Thank you! This is my first quilt, and I may discover I prefer hand stitching to machine to finish my binding as well![/quote]

    Yes, there is something about hand stitching the back of the binding (use machine to attach from the front) that soothes and completes all the hard work of piecing/quilting; and you get to be the first one "under the quilt" as it enfolds your lap, legs, esp. on a winter's evening!

  20. #45
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    Seems you already have great advice but I must say that I do not always backstitch and my quilts do not fall apart in the wash. When you add another sqaure or whatever piece you are going over that stitch again so it makes it stronger.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgriinke
    Your quilt will not fall apart because you didn't back stitch at the end of a seam. With quilting, almost all the time, you stitch over that part again. I have been quilting for about 17 years and have never backstitched and haven't had one quilt fall apart because of it.
    You must be someone who has always stitched clothing, and then have moved on to quilts. Backstitching is what you do with clothing consturction, not quilts. You can, but if it's not necessary, why spend the extra time.
    That's just my opinion.
    Think of us in the northern part of Wisconsin today - we are expecting anywhere from 6 to 14 inches of snow in the next 24 hours.........I thought it was spring???
    I'm just north of Milwaukee and it is raining here, what you get now in snow won't last, that is the only consolation we get
    in Wisconsin. The sun comes up each morning,be patient and
    glorious Spring and Summer will be here and we will wish for
    cooler weather.
    I agree with you, I haven't had any quilt fall apart because of no backstitching. And I reverse stitching with the walking foot all the time, have had no problems with them.
    You can sew both sides of the binding if you baste both edges
    together and sew once.

    Carol J.

  22. #47
    Senior Member cizzors's Avatar
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    I've got a universal WF for my new Brother. WF said do not back stitch with it. As usual, like a little kid, I had to try it :) I take three stitches everytime I need to and have never hada problem.

  23. #48
    Senior Member Chris Kieffer's Avatar
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    THANK YOU to all of you that took precious time out of your busy days to share your knowledge with me! I am ready to jump right in and finish this quilt! Truly, thank you for building my confidence!
    Chris

  24. #49
    Junior Member cbjlinda's Avatar
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    I backstitch on my pfaff with the dual feed down all the time. never a problem.

  25. #50
    Super Member Butterflyblue's Avatar
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    No one ever told me that a walking foot wasn't supposed to go backwards, and it isn't, apparently a problem with my particular foot and machine (a Kenmore), because I've done it often. That said, it shows up more than if you start your stitching on 0 stitch length and move it up slowly to normal, and end the same way (except moving from normal to 0). So that is what I do most of the time now.

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