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Thread: How Can I Recycle a man's shirt collar

  1. #1
    Member craft's Avatar
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    How Can I Recycle a man's shirt collar

    I finally found some dress shirts around my place. Some of the men's dress shirt collars have a light weight fused interfacing and some with this very stiff like interfacing on them. I would like to make use of all the fabric from the shirts that I can. I don't mind spending the time to take a shirt apart. Do any of you have any ideas as how can I use these for making quilted projects or even in a quilt?

    Take care, craft
    Last edited by craft; 02-07-2019 at 05:08 AM.

  2. #2
    Power Poster
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    Bonnie Hunter has a video on how to debone a shirt for the most fabric for quilting. I have also used a man’s XXL shirt and made it into an apron. It makes a nice apron with the collar and buttons left on in the front. My husband likes wearing it to barabecue because it isn’t girly.

  3. #3
    Super Member dublb's Avatar
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    If ya are truly wanting to use these interfaced fabrics then get a container just for these. Ya need to only use 'em w/other interfaced fabrics. It will take longer to get this container filled up. Then ya can cut them into squares & triangles to make a quilt outta 'em.
    Bev
    My initials are BB, so dublb is double B.

  4. #4
    Senior Member sewingitalltogether's Avatar
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    I saw a really cute apron made from mens shirts. They kept the collar, the buttons down the front and the pocket. Check out Pinterest for lots of different patterns.

  5. #5
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    Usually you can pull that interfacing off of the inside side of the fabric and use that piece like all others.

  6. #6
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    Yes, as justabitcrazy said, you can take the stabilizer off by pressing with an iron and peeling while it is hot. I have removed it before by getting it hot and starting an end, then pulling the fabric up and the stabilizer down, with it positioned at the edge of an ironing board or table. I leave the iron on it and it just slides back as the fabric pushes it. You quickly learn how fast to go. There is a little bit of glue still left on the fabric, but it doesn't change it enough to notice it.

  7. #7
    Super Member Aurora's Avatar
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    How about as a cord minder.
    Aurora

    "A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness. Bad manners. Lack of consideration for others in minor matters. A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot." -Robert A. Heinlein

  8. #8
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    It's not a quilt project, but I can't resist mentioning that somewhere or other, years ago, I saw the idea that you can cut off the collar below the tab that has the button and buttonhole, and then the collar can be buttoned around a dog's neck, just to look cute. You'd need a dog of the correct size, I suppose.
    “You can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have.” ~Maya Angelou.
    One's mind, once stretched by a new idea, never regains its original dimensions. ~Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

  9. #9
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    The cotton fabric in a good-quality man's shirt is much higher than most quilting fabrics on the market. A quilt made out of shirt fabric would last a long time and have a subtle sheen.

    I've been trying to find a thrift store that will save torn men's dress shirts, useless to them, for me.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Dakota Rose's Avatar
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    You could trim them to the size(s) needed, zig zaging several together if needed and use them as tote/bag bottoms. I usually cover the bottom or sew it into the lining so no one would ever know what is inside. It would give just the right amount of shaping/support and would make the bag completely washable.

  11. #11
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rose_P View Post
    It's not a quilt project, but I can't resist mentioning that somewhere or other, years ago, I saw the idea that you can cut off the collar below the tab that has the button and buttonhole, and then the collar can be buttoned around a dog's neck, just to look cute. You'd need a dog of the correct size, I suppose.
    i like this idea
    Nancy in western NY
    before you speak T.H.I.N.K.
    T – is it True? H – is it Helpful? I – is it Inspiring? N – is it Necessary? K – is it Kind?

    Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we are here we might as well dance.

  12. #12
    lbc
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    Senior Member lbc's Avatar
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    My husband passed away a few months ago and I made memory pillows from his shirts for myself and our children.

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