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Thread: How Did Everybody Get Into Quilting??

  1. #76
    Super Member huntannette's Avatar
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    Wow!! you were really commited! Very nice quilt....
    I`ve been sewing since I was young...but when I saw a quilt show about ten yrs ago I just had to try and make one...the rest is history...lol

  2. #77
    Cassews's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarrieAnne
    My Ex MIL quilted, and I loved her quilts. She taught me. She is a great lady, taught me how to be frugal, garden, can and freeze, sew and quilt. She grew up during the depression, and thought everyone should at leat have these skills. Its really paying off now!
    My DH's grandmother taught me how to crochet, can and freeze. She also taught me embroidery (well which I had forgotten after many years of fighting the learning from mom), When I was faced with 2 kids, no monies, I learned how to sew again-self taught-, how to make quilts because there was no monies for extras, scrimping, saving pennies .. Yes the depression era Grandmother taught me alot in life and to learn and keep on learning- so that is truly why I enjoy this board, I learn something new every time I visit. I agree with you very much on how they had those survival skills!

  3. #78
    Senior Member janquilts'ncrochets's Avatar
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    Nearly fifty years ago, when my only daughter was young, I made her a butterfly quilt with the help of my mother in law. That quilt is long gone, and it was probably 25 years later before I took the time and money to make another. I had 4 children & made most of their clothes an my own, so I was busy. Also worked out doing commercial sewing (boating and auto). Have been quilting again for about 20 years and love it more than ever. I think everyone in my family has at least one of my quilts now. I can't stop making them though and I love this board. I'm here every day.

  4. #79
    Super Member laalaaquilter's Avatar
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    Great story and beautiful quilt!!

    I grew up with quilts around me although I never saw the work done. All the quilts had been made by Grandma and her sisters and SIL long before I was born. In my teens my sister repaired one of the old quilts so I got to see her do the hand work of replacing worn pieces into the remainder of the quilt. Sister taught me to sew clothes when I was fourteen or fifteen and somehow in that process I ended up with a number of pieces of fabric that were just sitting around. I moved those yards around for years until I quit smoking in 1987(my mid twenties). When I quit smoking I had to do something with my hands so I got back to cross-stitch and needlepoint. And saw the fabric sitting there. So I started cutting into squares. Laid the squares out on the dining room floor in the apartment and moved them around till it suited me and then started sewing them together. I knew nothing about how they were supposed to go together..that there were rules of thumb for this or color choices that should be made...I just used what I had...which were three solids and two prints. Solid purple, orange, and apple green, flannel red calico print, and a chambray looking fabric with flocked apple cores on it. Then I went looking for a backing. Ended up with a floral sheet that had almost all the colors in it on white back ground. That top and backing have sat, folded up on a shelf or in a drawer through more moves. I have had a friend for a number of years who is an avid quilter and I told her about my UFO. She set to trying to get me to quilt it and since I lost my job in 2008 she's been encouraging me more and more...to the point of sponsoring me in a longarm tutorial last year. Over the twenty or so years that have passed I have collected buttons and sequined appliques and rick-rack to embellish the top (it is already so ugly, how can it hurt? also I have no intention of ever putting this thing on a bed...it will be hung on a wall) and have recently begun collecting fabric for a binding. I've always thought a dark gray almost black would be best. I have two fabrics (a yard each) so far and hope for at least one more so I can scrap a binding together. I know I still need batting and have no clue what to use...especially as this quilt will never see a bed or a washing machine. Avid quilter friend (and now teacher) is in the market for a long arm for her home and has offered me free use. And I know I can rent time on the machines at LQS where I took the tutorial (and quilted a charity quilt for teacher afterward). Early this year teacher prevailed upon me to join BOM that was starting in February so I shelled out my $6 and am off and running. Teacher and I don't agree on stuff alot but I definitely learn from her experience (she's been quilting more than 20 years). I've been talking about this board so much she asked me this evening to forward the link to her so she can check it out ;-)

    Attached are pictures of the top, backing sheet, and embellishment collection. Yes that white stitching is where I sewed the seam allowance down so it would be easier to sew the rows together ;-) The variation in color you see is because I didn't pay any attention on the solids as to what was right vs wrong side and didn't pay any attention to nap. Some of the embellishments are vintage from my mother's clothes from the 60's and some from Grandma's treadle cabinet drawers from 30's & 40's. Others are from various visits to Joann's and Hancocks over the years for clothing repair supplies.

    I plan to quilt it using lines from the backing sheet...maybe leaves and flowers? I'm collecting orange thread for the bobbin (the only color NOT on the backing sheet) and yellow for the top thread (the only color NOT on the top).

    If I get more accounting clients maybe I'll be able to set aside money to rent time on LQS longarm rather than wait for teacher to buy hers. ;-)

    I've had so much fun collecting for and dreaming about this particular quilt I'm almost reluctant to quilt it ;-)

    To be entered in Ugly Quilt contest when completed
    Name:  Attachment-172691.jpe
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    Backing sheet
    Name:  Attachment-172692.jpe
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Size:  52.7 KB

    Some buttons and appliques
    Name:  Attachment-172693.jpe
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Size:  63.6 KB

    more embellishments
    Name:  Attachment-172694.jpe
Views: 31
Size:  61.8 KB

  5. #80
    Senior Member jollyquilting's Avatar
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    I always liked quilts, once I bought some squares and sewed them together for my sister, tied it together. I knew nothing about quilting and did everything wrong, you know seams that are good and 1/4 seams and such. It was pretty good and that for me, was a one time event. Had it passed me by. OOps, my dear husband bought me a fancy sewing machine that was called THE QUILTERS DREAM, by Elna. Now what in the world could I do.

    I had to use that silly thing and I was not a sewer and the few times I attempted to sew, everything was crooked. So, not wanting to hurt his feelings < I signed up to take a quilt. I was doing pretty good until the bobbin ran out and I didn't know how to fill it. I was so discouraged and angry at all the new stuff to learn, I was about to leave. The leader made me stay and finish what I started. OOOH, I am so glad she made me stay. I am totally addicted.

    Now I can make bobbins, have a chance to once in awhile get the seams even, at least the short ones. PTL for 1/4inch foot. I

    I have only been quilting for about 12 years and will soon be 69 so you know that late blooming is never to late..

  6. #81
    Super Member leiladylei54's Avatar
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    When my DGD was born, I decided that it would be fun to make a Christmas quilt for her. My sisters were so excited as I had professed for years that I would NEVER quilt. LOL Now I'm addicted!!!

  7. #82
    Super Member audsgirl's Avatar
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    I watched Simply Quilts with no intention of ever doing any quilting. I don't do well with machinery. But after so long, I thought I'd try it. So it's all Alex Anderson's fault!

  8. #83
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    My Mom and Grandma made quilts while I was growing up as well as my grandma's sisters (even my grandpa would help every now and then). They were always so beautiful. I always wanted to make them too, but never had the confidence. I would watch every quilting show on tv and collect every pattern that I liked and even bought fabric just becausde. But, I now have a husband that has enough confidence in me for both of us and then some. I made 12 quillows as presents for Christmas 2010 , then I had the confidence to try to make a real quilt. I made a Sunbonnet Sue for our granddaughter that was born in Jan. Now I'm hooked, which is good because all the kids and grands want thier own quilt. My oldest DGS is almost 9 and I think he is ready to start making a quilt. He told me the other day "Nana there is no such thing as to much cloth!" I always knew he was smart!!

  9. #84
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    I have knitted and sewn since I was about 11 or 12 years old. When I had little children, in my 30's, I had the desire to make them some quilts. My early attempts were very primitive but my kids didn't know any better, either, and loved their "blankies". Then I left quilting alone for the next decade or more, while I concentrated on fashion sewing and design, as well as knitting design. Every year our State Fair would send me an invitation to come participate in the State Fair Quilting Bee, and that little bit of hand quilting, even just once a year, kept me wanting to get back into quilting. Finally, just last year a friend's diagnosis with breast cancer succeeded in pulling me back into quilting. I knew God was calling me to make her a prayer quilt... About that same time I found this board (also Providential) and quilting became SO INTERESTING to me. I have enjoyed it and learned so much. I am accumulating a stash of fabrics, and have enough patterns in my mental 'queue' to keep me quilting a long time. Thanks to all of you for the inspiration!

  10. #85
    Senior Member jollyquilting's Avatar
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    This has been so fun to find all the ways we create beauty for our souls and all of us have a story. How neat

  11. #86
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    A colleague (and migrant) from Minnesota invited me to her house for dinner on Monday nights. She had 4 children, and it was her 'night off'. Her husband would cook and we sewed before and after dinner. She introduced me to American quilting and piecing. Later, she opened a shop and was found deceased by a customer as she had had an aneurysm.I remember her fondly and especially when I see the combination of blues,creams and browns together as they were 'her colours'.

  12. #87
    Super Member Happy Tails's Avatar
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    OMG I love reading everybody's stories. I hope more and more people come forward and tell their stories. :)

  13. #88
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    As a small child, Cut squares and triangles for grandmother and her quilting friends. About 20 years after that, as a young wife, I made one baby quilt for each of my four sons. About 30 years after that, while bedridden with two broken legs (a long story) I got hooked on Alex Anderson's TV show and taped every episode (pver 50 hours) and as they say "the rest is history". My stash has grown from a few shoe boxes of fabric pieces to a sewing room bulging at the seams, closets shelves packed with fabric, storages containers under the bed. I even gave aways sheets and towels so I could store fabric in the linen closet. Three sewing machines, one embroidery machine amd all the necessary quilting "goodies". With the price of cotton going through the roof, I don't ever HAVE to buy again - but we all know I will.
    I just wanted to make quilts for my six grandchildren and one for myself. Damn you Alex Anderson, for making it look soooooo... easy. LOL!!!!

  14. #89
    Super Member juliea9967's Avatar
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    That is a great first quilt, and a great story. I sewed for years, but never thought I would be interested in quilting. I had taken 2 pieces of fabric and put batting in the middle and enveloped it for grandchildren, but never would I be interested in cutting the fabric into little pieces and then sewing them all together again. What a waste of time, I thought.
    We moved from a big metropolitan area (Seattle, WA) to a small town in southern Idaho (Twin Falls). I went to the local sewing machine shop for sewing classes. In one of the classes 2 nice ladies asked for help in putting together a quilt representing 9/11. They were doing it as a charity project for the local battered woman's shelter. Over the next 2 or 3 classes they asked repeatedly and no one would help them put it together. I thought it was a good charity project so I told them I had never quilted before, but I would love to help them if I could. I didn't realize it but I was hooking up with 2 very accomplished sewers/quilters. They designed the quilt, let me help them sew the pieces all together (I am sure they had to rip many of them out) and then they put the blocks together. We took that quilt to local events and shows and sold raffle tickets. We earned over $3,500 for the charity. We appeared on the front page of the local newspaper a couple of times. There was a magazine article about the quilt. When we would open up the quilt at events there would be ooooohs and aaaahs. People would cry. Needless to say this was such an experience for me that I now am addicted to quilting. I know I will never be as good as my 2 mentors are, they are truly artists, but they have given me a joy that I would have missed out on if not for them.
    The quilt was called "Lest We Forget". You can see it here:
    http://www.stitchintime.ws/community.htm

  15. #90
    Junior Member mrsddh97's Avatar
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    About 4 yrs ago, a friend asked me to give her $40. She said we are taking a quilting class. I said No that after learning to sew in high school along with my mother being a sewer and me making stuff for my son when he was little, I said I would never sew again. I never want to make another garment again in my life, I do not like it. She said you are going. She had just taken a sewing class and the instructor also taught quilting and she want me to do it with her. I gave in and was hooked. 4 yrs later we are part of a guild, planning events, traveling to quilts shows, displaying our work etc. I still will never make another garment and that includes a quilted one.

  16. #91

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    My start at this addiction also had to do with Christmas in mind. I have 2 daughters (they are 13 years apart in age) that are really close and also great with a sewing machine (didn't want to call them "sewers" - that word can be used in more than one way). I taught the older one to sew when she was 7 years old - she was the fussiest clothes shopper - taught her to sew her own clothes rather than take her shopping for them. Anyway - big idea for Christmas was a mother/daughter bonding time. Went to our LQS and signed us up for a class. I bought a cutting mat, rotary cutter, ruler and included a coupon for their choice of fabric in the package. The class was every Saturday for 6 weeks and before it was over we were all hooked.

  17. #92
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    Everybody has such wonderful and interesting stories. Hope you enjoy mine. When my mother passed away, I inherited 3 quilt tops. One of them is a 'Double Wedding Ring' which is large enough to cover a king size bed and still drape all the way to the floor. This top was pieced together in 1936 (before I was born) by my mother and father. Dad cut the pieces while mother sewed them together. It is HAND pieced. At the time, she was pregnant with my brother. I don't know why she never finished the quilt. However, it inspired me to learn to quilt. This was in1982, and I was still working. After my retirement, I took a quilting class, and since have been making quilts and hand quilting them in order to become good enough to finish the DWR. I currently have 2 tops that I am working on simultaneously (one that I am hand quilting and one that I am piecing). When I complete these, I plan to start quilting the DWR. In later life, mother was a professional seamstress so her work has always been immaculate. I only hope I can do the quilt justice. Can't you just imagine the quilt label on the back? "Top pieced by Mr. & Mr. JCB, in 1936. Quilted by their daughter BAR in 2011."

  18. #93

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    In 1996 when I was informed that my 25 year old singer died my DH went with me to the repair store to pick it up. We entered the store and OMG he was so impress by what the new machines could do(there were Phaffs, brothers, and other amazing machines) that he sat down with George, who could sell you back your own children and you would say thank you. So ofcourse my DH bought me a phaff. We proudly brought my new machine home and started playing with it. Since I only did occasional sewing, I though this is to expensive of a machine just to use occasionally. I thought about the quilts I had seen at the store and decided that maybe I could learn to quilt. Went online and read about 9 patch and snowball blocks. bought some fabric made my first snowball and 9 patch quilt. However, I set them on point not knowing about bias or how to cut setting triangles so you can imagine how it turned out. After that experience I decided to take my first quilting class and have been hooked every since. Little did my DH know what he was letting himself in for, when he bought me that first machine. I currently have the brother 2000D and for Christmas he traded in my old Phaff bought me the brother 6000D as our anneversrey and Christmas present. I am so lucky to have him.

  19. #94
    Senior Member pheasantduster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grandma pepsi
    Everybody has such wonderful and interesting stories. Hope you enjoy mine. When my mother passed away, I inherited 3 quilt tops. One of them is a 'Double Wedding Ring' which is large enough to cover a king size bed and still drape all the way to the floor. This top was pieced together in 1936 (before I was born) by my mother and father. Dad cut the pieces while mother sewed them together. It is HAND pieced. At the time, she was pregnant with my brother. I don't know why she never finished the quilt. However, it inspired me to learn to quilt. This was in1982, and I was still working. After my retirement, I took a quilting class, and since have been making quilts and hand quilting them in order to become good enough to finish the DWR. I currently have 2 tops that I am working on simultaneously (one that I am hand quilting and one that I am piecing). When I complete these, I plan to start quilting the DWR. In later life, mother was a professional seamstress so her work has always been immaculate. I only hope I can do the quilt justice. Can't you just imagine the quilt label on the back? "Top pieced by Mr. & Mr. JCB, in 1936. Quilted by their daughter BAR in 2011."
    Wonderful story - I know you will do the Wedding Ring Quilt justice.

  20. #95
    Member HoneysMom's Avatar
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    My grandmother quilted when I was little and also made me a wedding quilt I will always cherish. While staying at home with my daughters, when they were little, I started watching Eleanor Burns and I was hooked.

  21. #96
    Senior Member GrammaO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diana Lynne
    Not really sure..I always hated sewing and anytime my Mother tried to teach me, I was running out the door to go to my horses..Still trying to figure out why all of a sudden to make quilts has become one of my many loves..To me, its like painting..You never really know what its going to look like until its all done..And for me I guess that is why I love it so..
    That's so funny! That is exactly how my story starts out! My mother quilted and made clothes. She managed to teach me to embroidery but I despised sewing. Would much rather be riding my horse or playing outside with the dogs. When my first grandbaby arrived I decided to emboider a crib quilt panel. Lots of work...took forever! Decided I'd better learn something quicker and decided to try quilting. First few were panels that I just put binding on and finally worked up the nerve to piece something. Current count is 16 grandkids with one on the way. So far, most of them have a baby blanket and eventually all will have at least a lap sized quilt. Now I'm just addicted and wished I had learned more from my mom while she was still alive.

  22. #97
    Senior Member darlin121's Avatar
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    I've just spent a couple of hours on this board reading all the stories of how ya'll got started. What a great read!
    I had made clothes for my myself since I was 8years old. I recall I made a lavender jumper skirt with material my mom let me pick out myself. I got to use her machine! I remember her saying that I had to save the scraps for her so she could use them later and indeed they showed up in a scrappy 4 patch that she made a few years later. Anyway I had a friend of mine who called me up one weekend and said I had to try making a quilt. I said no way! But kicking and screaming in protest she made me go to her house, I thought we were going to be cutting up little squares all day. She introduced me to quilting through the Quilt In A Day Log Cabin book by Eleanor Burns. It took me two days and I loved every minute of it. It was FUN! So I thought since I was so good at making the Log Cabin pattern I could strike out on my own and make something I really wanted....A Double Wedding Ring Quilt! No one told me this was not a good idea.... they should have! I fussed with cutting out the pieces and fighting the bias and trying to make it work, well it is currently my oldest UFO clocking in at 32+ years! It keeps me humble. I didn't let my failure to finish it stop me from my path in quilting. I returned to the Elenor Burns Quilt In A Day Series and honed my skills, lol. Now I can pretty much make anything I want to but I find my taste are always changing. I love trying new things and usually make a quilt or two out of whatever new technique I have come across. I love the process and I call each quilt one of my 'babies'. They all go to friends and family who are instructed to USE them until they wear out and I can always make them another. I've never had to replace one yet, it makes me feel good that they take care of them. My current project is an embroiderd quilt.... and of course there is always the double wedding ring quilt to finish..... riiiight!

  23. #98
    Super Member quilttiludrop's Avatar
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    My mother was a quilter. She enjoyed working with fabric. I do too! I started sewing when I was about 9 years old.

  24. #99
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    As a preamble to this topic, I need to tell you that I have been sewing since I was a kid (I'm 63 years old now). The first thing that I made was an apron, during a weekend that I stayed with my aunt while my folks were away. I guess that my Aunt Rose lit the fire in me, even though it would smolder for some years into the future. Much later when I was an adult, I used to work with a woman who was a prolific quilter and in fact, she made a quilt for me when I got married. I always admired my friend's quilts and the skills that went into making them. At the time, I was mad for making jig saw puzzles. They kept me busy in the evenings and kept me from "unauthorized" snacking, as well. At some point, it occurred to me that that if I could construct a puzzle, I could quilt. So, I took some classes and to this day, I am a quilter. I have never frgotten my aunt (since deceased) and how she started me on home sewing. So, a couple of years ago, I bought a sewing machine for MY niece, sort of paying my aunt's kindness forward. We meet occasionally to sew, but right now, my niece is in the throws of being a teenager and all that involves, so quilting will have to wait a while.

  25. #100
    Super Member laalaaquilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in VA
    My first exposure to quilts came when I was about 8 years old. Didtant relatives of my father's had found him by looking for any family member with the Dabney/Collier name, to take on an antique family quilt that was about to pass out of the family line. Her was the first male to inherit it. I remember driving a long way from home with him to pick up this quilt and how much fun it was because we got to have a store-bought ice cream cone. We arrived back home, Mother and Daddy spread out the quilt on their bedroom floor to see what it looked like. I remember thinking, "All this excitement about *that* thing?!"

    Decades later I was treated to lunch in a little cafe that had a small quilt store upstairs. We went up to look around after eating and I signed up to take a class. Made three quilts in 6 weeks with those girls. That was in 1983 and I've never looked back!

    The family quilt shown below was made prior to 1780, according to the Textile Museum at Colonial Williamsburg, where it now resides. It is one of the earliest they have ever seen, made near Richmond, VA from linen grown from flax on the plantation and imported English calicos.
    It is pieced almost exactly as we piece today, with 8 point stars and broderie Perse applique. The colors were stunning originally, with vivid rose pinks and clear aqua blue in the applique from the imported calicos.
    It is actually rather prettier than these pictures, but was in such fragile condition after 225 years of love and display, that I had to give it up to safty and restoration when it passed to me.

    Jan in VA
    What a stunning history Jan...so glad it is in the museum now so all can appreciate it.

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