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Thread: How do you cut your borders?

  1. #26
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moonpi
    For big quilts, I rip them lengthwise.
    i like mine lengthwise also. i just bought myself a 36" ruler just for that purpose.now i fold on the straight grain as much as i need to and rotary cut. YEA! :thumbup: :thumbup:

  2. #27
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moonpi
    For big quilts, I rip them lengthwise.
    I have read that ppl 'rip' before, to stay on grain...but doesn't this stretch the fabric?

  3. #28
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    posted while on page 1.
    I have a question?
    Can I just make a template with freezer paper and press to fabric and either rotary cut or with shears? I don't want my borders pieced. I want to cut down the selvedge edge, in fact I have some cut now and I don't think they are crooked, but maybe tomorrow I will unfold and look. I hope it doesn't smile at me. was parallel to selvedge, and was folded.

  4. #29
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    i think if you rip off the selvedge edge itself, you will have a straight edge.
    how you then cut that second edge determines whether THAT edge is straight.

    huh?

    rip off the selvedge, measure in the amount you want. either rip or cut at that measure. if it smiles, then you cut it crooked. the selvedge is always straight. if it's crooked, you can always straighten it out by recutting or re-ripping on the edge that you originally cut. don't touch the selvedge edge.
    if you only ripped it, it's always straight.

    if you decide to rip that second edge, it may stretch a little. press it out.

  5. #30
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    i also have another idea i may try. I'm not ready to rip just yet.
    I kept piece of door stripping, brand new, never used. it's got to be 6-7 feet long and I have a 48 architects ruler too, and squares etc. men's tools are cheaper than ours.
    anyway, i don't see why this metal stripping wouldn't be like a super long straight edged ruler. gonna see how i do with freezer ppr first. That is, if my current way did not work. I think it did. (the usual folding)

  6. #31
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    one thing about using metal is that it can hurt your rotary blade. if you use it to draw a line, it can slip and slide.

    the other thing is that if it is narrow in width and thin in mm's it can warp, so be careful. maybe you should check that against a straight edge first.

    i just treated myself to a 36" ruler for rotary cutting and i haven't used it yet, but i just got tired of looking for makeshift fixes. it will pay for itself in headaches.

    i got it at joann's 40% coupon 'sale'.

    there are no easy answers. just challenges.

  7. #32
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by butterflywing
    one thing about using metal is that it can hurt your rotary blade. if you use it to draw a line, it can slip and slide.

    the other thing is that if it is narrow in width and thin in mm's it can warp, so be careful. maybe you should check that against a straight edge first.

    i just treated myself to a 36" ruler for rotary cutting and i haven't used it yet, but i just got tired of looking for makeshift fixes. it will pay for itself in headaches.

    i got it at joann's 40% coupon 'sale'.

    there are no easy answers. just challenges.
    wow, thanks, butterflywing, these are things I hadn't thought of. Using the metal i was going to have to lay it out and drag out my 'wallboards'. We were going to redo bathroom and bought some wallboard and when we decided to make space a closet, I snagged it for basting etc. have sawhorses, but it's a bit of a bother just to cut borders.
    I didn't know rulers came in 36" lengths. I better check that 48" metal/carpenters ruler I have for accuracy. It will still come in handy for measuring.
    I have to be careful about when I start to make a cut, not to get my rotary blade on top of clear ruler at the corner of it. Hard to see, but my sandpaper dots for slippage is a visual barrier too.
    That clear...can't remember name...but a while back, put this stuff on one side of rulers, it's clear, for slippage. Didn't work for me.

  8. #33

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    when i cut norders I measure the quilt top bottom in thru the middle take the average and cut across the fabric ($$inches) not the lenghtwise. join on the angle to get the right width or lenght I need , find the middle of the strip put tp the middle of the quilt side and pin then pin the ends and makte the rest fit to the average measurement. Make the two sides the same also top and bottom I hope this helps and you can understand . my directions . also check Fon and porters site they have great directions for doing this Good Luck Happy Quilting Andie

  9. #34
    Senior Member Kara's Avatar
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    I cut mine on the straight of grain.
    I carefully fold the fabric aligning one selvage edge.
    Fold it into thirds, fourths, whatever, to get it to fit under the 24" ruler.
    Cut away.

    Good luck with your borders.

  10. #35
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andie
    when i cut norders I measure the quilt top bottom in thru the middle take the average and cut across the fabric ($$inches) not the lenghtwise. join on the angle to get the right width or lenght I need , find the middle of the strip put tp the middle of the quilt side and pin then pin the ends and makte the rest fit to the average measurement. Make the two sides the same also top and bottom I hope this helps and you can understand . my directions . also check Fon and porters site they have great directions for doing this Good Luck Happy Quilting Andie
    i wish that worked for me. it just doesn't. i think i have a very heavy hand. when i handle crossgrain in long strips i always end up stretching it against the quilt and then again against the binding. i end up with wiggles in the edge of the border. now i cut lengths of border first. usually too much, but that's ok. than i cut my pieces from the rest... whatever gets left behind is stash.

  11. #36
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    well, butterfly wing, that is basically what I do, is cut down length, parallel to selvedge edge. I cut longer too, so I have enough when it comes time, and no short surprises :shock:
    i read that ppl cut borders exact lengths etc. ahead of time, and we have to 'square' quilt up at some point. I am not brave enough, or, knowing myself, dumb enough, to cut exactly that far ahead.
    For me, knowing that my stuff probably isn't going to be just so, at least for now, until i get better at this, it would be dumb.
    It's reccommended that if you piece your backings, that you use at least a half inch seam for strength. Guess we all use quarter inch seams on front, bc pioneer women had to make the most of what they had. I think I should give myself more leeway for a bit. I don't know. I'll see how this quilt I've just about got ready to sew goes. Just waiting for new surge protector to come. :D

  12. #37
    Super Member pittsburgpam's Avatar
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    After tearing the strips, ironing and very lightly starching, I got them sewn on last night. They are very nice strips, nice and straight, and it only took a few moments to tear each one. What a time and aggravation saver. I realized one advantage that if the pattern is printed well, tearing it makes the edges follow the repeat at the same point all along the length. That could really come in handy, especially if you are matching pattern on a mitered corner.

    I think I would use this for piecing backing too. That's also a mental block of mine, worrying about cutting them straight.

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/posts/list/17766.page

  13. #38
    Super Member Quiltgranny's Avatar
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    Hi,

    So, it IS possible to get past the fear of ripping? Great, I'll give it a try; have a long border project coming up. Thanks for all the great suggestions here.

    One I'd like to pass along is another reason borders might wave is due to the way they're machine quilted. It's important to keep the density of your quilting similar over all the quilt. For example, if the body of your quilt is densely quilted, but your borders are only lighted quilted, they will likely wave. Ask me how I know! LOL Wish I could remember where I've read this, but it does seem to be true. If anyone knows differently, please advise. Thanks so much.

    Happy quilting,

  14. #39
    Senior Member dlf0122quilting's Avatar
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    I used to get wavy cuts and it was because I was not "walking" my fingers up the ruler as I cut my strips. If you only hold your ruler in one spot for the entire cut, the ruler has a tendency to shift just slightly and there will be a small wavy area where you were holding the ruler. I learned this from an instructor and I have never had that problem since. I also was instructed that you can cut WOF for sashing strips but borders should be cut LOF to prevent wavy borders. Sometimes I try it LOF if I have bought enough fabric but I do not find much difference as long as I have been careful in walking my fingers up the ruler as I cut. For the newby's, walking is like "Itsy Bitsy Spider" walking by always moving your thumb up to meet your fingers, then move your fingers forward. Another tip is to always hold your pinky finger off the edge of the ruler against the side of the ruler to steady it on the fabric. It is probably just as important that you put little dots of sand paper or Invisigrip or something like these products on the bottom of your ruler so it adheres to the fabric. These little tips saved me so much time and ruined fabric because my ruler was always sliding on the fabric when I would cut. I hope some of these tips will help you. I do not use a metal ruler only because I am fortunate enough to have the Omnigrid (and others) rulers so I do not know if these tips will help you when using the metal rulers but you might try some of them. Good luck.

  15. #40
    Member Donna - Batiks's Avatar
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    Mine used to wave too until I realized the most important thing when folding to cut....make sure the fold is straight! That is what gets rid of the wave. If your fold at the bottom is straight it will cut straight. You might even have to cut both sides of the fabric to straighten it....but the fold is the most important in being striaght.
    Good luck.

  16. #41
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moonpi
    For big quilts, I rip them lengthwise.
    I think that this is the best way to assure that the strips are straight. Just trim off the ripped edges.

  17. #42
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlf0122quilting
    I used to get wavy cuts and it was because I was not "walking" my fingers up the ruler as I cut my strips. If you only hold your ruler in one spot for the entire cut, the ruler has a tendency to shift just slightly and there will be a small wavy area where you were holding the ruler. I learned this from an instructor and I have never had that problem since. I also was instructed that you can cut WOF for sashing strips but borders should be cut LOF to prevent wavy borders. Sometimes I try it LOF if I have bought enough fabric but I do not find much difference as long as I have been careful in walking my fingers up the ruler as I cut. For the newby's, walking is like "Itsy Bitsy Spider" walking by always moving your thumb up to meet your fingers, then move your fingers forward. Another tip is to always hold your pinky finger off the edge of the ruler against the side of the ruler to steady it on the fabric. It is probably just as important that you put little dots of sand paper or Invisigrip or something like these products on the bottom of your ruler so it adheres to the fabric. These little tips saved me so much time and ruined fabric because my ruler was always sliding on the fabric when I would cut. I hope some of these tips will help you. I do not use a metal ruler only because I am fortunate enough to have the Omnigrid (and others) rulers so I do not know if these tips will help you when using the metal rulers but you might try some of them. Good luck.
    I have used both sandpaper and Invisigrip. the sandpaper works just fine for me, (although it's not perfect, bc you can't see thru it), but I eventually took my Invisigrip off. I did not find it to help much and bc I use "handles" with the suction cups, I have a lg. one that was made for using on side of tub...I started doing that, before anybody sold them for that, bc one of my girls is handicapped and I had bought an extra one,...anyway, the suction caused the invisigrip to buckle. It wasn't doing it's job anyway IMHO. thanks for all the tips dlfquilting. I too, have learned to walk fingers,...anything that'll keep that sucker still. :D

  18. #43
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    for long ruler cuts i take a piece of no slip drawer liner and lay it an inch or so away from the to be cut edge onto the fabric and then lay the ruler down on top of the no slip drawer liner. This keeps the ruler from shifting when you are cutting with one hand and holding the ruler down with the other.'
    I try not to buy crap from CHINA, but the $1 store carries this so I can cut sizes to match all my rulers. IF you have a long metal ruler you can spray glue the drawer liner to the bottom of the ruler and save a step.

  19. #44
    Senior Member Overlander's Avatar
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    I was told to cut your border material the length of your material not across the width. Apparently there is less 'give' to the length so you end up with flatter borders. This is the first quilt I've done it with and so far they do look flat. I'll let you know once it is quilted. Barb

  20. #45
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    I was also taught not to piece borders (back in 1982), so I go out of my way to purchase extra length to avoid piecing...though on rare occasions, it has been necessary. When that happens, I usually try to find a creative idea to insert in the border (like blocks the width of the border) that enhance the appearance of the quilt. I would NEVER cut long borders from selvage to selvage and piece them. With large quilts, I also fold the fabric and make one cut to remove the selvage and then another one for each section of border. I have never had a problem with waviness. Maybe it would help to press the folded fabric before making the cuts. Spray starch or sizing on the fabric could help too.


  21. #46
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb in calif
    for long ruler cuts i take a piece of no slip drawer liner and lay it an inch or so away from the to be cut edge onto the fabric and then lay the ruler down on top of the no slip drawer liner. This keeps the ruler from shifting when you are cutting with one hand and holding the ruler down with the other.'
    I try not to buy crap from CHINA, but the $1 store carries this so I can cut sizes to match all my rulers. IF you have a long metal ruler you can spray glue the drawer liner to the bottom of the ruler and save a step.
    I have some of this in sewing room. going to try it tomorrow fer sure! thanks eb in calif. :)

  22. #47

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    The most fun I had with a border was to make 1/2 sq triangles. Use a tone on tone white or tan for one half and then cut up all thoes charm squares you 've aquired. Be sure to also use some pieces from the body of the top.

  23. #48
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    Your finished product will improve if you cut crosswise and piece the borders. The reason is because there is no give in the fabric when cutting lengthwise but there is a slight give side to side.

    If you have a bit longer on one side than the other be sure you average the length and cut both sides the same and make them fit. Whichever piece is the longer one needs to be put on the bottom so the feeds will ease the excess in without tucks. Divide up the side of the quilt in fourths and the border as well. Match the points. With longer side down sew.

    Good luck

  24. #49
    Senior Member dizzy's Avatar
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    i do the diaginal cuton my fabric to .it seemsso much simpler to me .my grandmother used to fold the back of th quilt over to to front an make that her selavage but she also used a sheet for her backs of her quilts .the only way i use a sheet for the back of my quilt is if it is high qulity sheet not a cheepy from walmart.i have picked up a few at the good will that are the higher thread count.an make a betufil backing .matter of a fact i have one i have not used because of the qulity of the thread count in it .it's like a very fine linnen.i want to put it on a very special quilt like on i'm getting good money for our one that i'm going to put on myveryon bed.

  25. #50
    Senior Member dizzy's Avatar
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    iputit on the bottom of sewing feet so i dont have to chase across the room an on serger feet to.an for a asortment of fabric i get the ones from the carpet an apolsterey material. an get a real good asortment from my aunt for free. can't beat that all i have to do is make sure theres gas in car. :-) :-) :-) :-) :-)

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