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Thread: How do you make OBW quilts with multiple sizes of blocks like this one?

  1. #1
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    How do you make OBW quilts with multiple sizes of blocks like this one?

    I came across this quilt and was wondering how you make it with multiple size blocks?? Her blog says she used 6 inch, 9 inch and 12 inch blocks.

    I've made 2 OBW quilts and have fabric for 2 more. It would be nice to have the option of using multiple sizes to jazz it up a bit.


    http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=...rt=121&ndsp=42

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    Oh, I get it. These are 8 sized (kaleidoscope) blocks. So she is able to piece the blocks across and the 6, 9 and 12 blocks work together like a puzzle. Now I have to figure out how to make the kaleidoscope block. Darn, I don't have enough for 8 repeats of what I have purchased.

    ETA--what is she using to fill the spaces in the corners of each block?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by AngelinaMaria View Post
    ETA--what is she using to fill the spaces in the corners of each block?
    I think cuts from the same strips you cut the main triangles from. You'd have nice stacks of 8 so you could plan the corners out to have nice repeats. Not sure the exact dimensions but looks like 45-45-90 triangles.

  4. #4
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    in the OBW book, she uses squares pieced like 4 patch posies:
    http://www.connectingthreads.com/tut...lock__D20.html
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
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  5. #5
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    She makes each kaleidoscope hexagon, then she squares off each of the hexes by adding a triangle to 4 of the outer hexagons. Once she has square blocks to work with, as long as she is working with squares in sizes that are multiples of 3 ... she can mix and match. A 12" square can be matched to two 6" squares ... etc.

    it's a very pretty quilt. It looks like she planned the placements before she added the squaring triangles to get matches at the corners, and it looks like she cut the matching triangles in a kaleidoscope pattern. Very clever, and well planned setting.
    Last edited by DogHouseMom; 12-30-2014 at 05:25 PM.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

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    Super Member QuiltingVagabond's Avatar
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    Well, isn't that striking! Thanks for posting this.
    QuiltingVagabond aka Kathy

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess View Post
    in the OBW book, she uses squares pieced like 4 patch posies:
    http://www.connectingthreads.com/tut...lock__D20.html
    Oh goodness. I actually have both of the OBW books. I'm looking at it now. thanks.

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    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    I dunno, but it sure is gorgeous!
    http://s1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh485/KitsieH/
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    Are they hexagons or octagons...or a combo. Looks like a pieced millefiori

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    Super Member woody's Avatar
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    It looks as though they are all octagons. Wow what a gorgeous OBW!
    The biggest risk is the one not taken

  11. #11
    Super Member Yooper32's Avatar
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    The quilt is WOW, but you can't beat the name of it either..."Ode to Spode".
    Yooper32 aka: Donna B

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by AngelinaMaria View Post
    Darn, I don't have enough for 8 repeats of what I have purchased.
    Question: When purchasing fabric with a big print it has repeats down the length of the fabric. Isn't this repeat "repeated" on the other half of the fabric also. I mean if there is a large flower at the edge of the fabric, there is another one in that same line, farther over into the fabric. Is that understandable? Has anyone purchased 4 repeats, cut in half down the center and found the same pattern on both sides?
    The fabric I have has already been cut up on one half, so I can't see how it relates to the other half.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  13. #13
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    I just measured my repeat (I already knew that it was 24 inches lengthwise) and found it is 24 by 30 inches. So, I can't use the other half as additional repeats. I made this one and found the repeat was only around 14 by 18 inches or something similar so I did have to cut many different sets of repeats. That is good because it gives more variety but it also means you have to go through the sweat of getting your 6 fabrics perfectly aligned with pins.
    Attached Images Attached Images


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    First and foremost, Happy New Year everyone. All the good, important things for you this year.

    I see squares when I blow the quilt picture up. And when I do the math I come up with various combinations of 6, 9, and 12 that make the same sized block (9+12=21, 6x2+9=21, 6x2=12, 12x1=12, 12x2-24, 6x4=24, 9x2+6=24, and so on, not to mention 6x1=6 and 9x1=9). Then I think I see corner triangles used to "square off" the various straight sided blocks. I think the secret is to decide what final size block is good for a quilt like this and then figure out how many different combinations of 6, 9, and 12 are possible (or pleasing) and start building blocks or blocks that are combinations of other blocks.

    Oh i hope this reply is even just a little bit clear. This is a conversation that I would usually have with assorted cut out squares and a lot of show and tell or pencil and paper and show and tell. Words for concepts like this most often are beyond my capabilities.

    Pat

  15. #15
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    Pat, I completely understand what you are saying and figured out the same after looking more closely myself. The corners of the octogon shapes are the interesting part as they too are kaleidoscope in design. Very pretty.

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