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  • How do you piece batting with fusible interfacing

    Old 11-27-2010, 04:06 PM
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    I am tired of stitching batting together, but my bolt of batting is 90" wide and my quilt top is 102", so something must be done. I picked up some Pellon lightweight fusible interfacing, and I'm going to try fusing the batting pieces together. I'm using W&N batting. I will be quilting on my longarm. The plan is to cut 1.5" strips of the interfacing and apply to the batting - but that's as far as I've gotten in the thought process.

    I have some questions. Should I cut off the side edges of the batting before using it? Should I put a cloth (damp or otherwise?) over the interfacing (which is laid on top of the seam in the batting) before applying the iron? Should I fuse both sides together? Anything else I should know?

    This interfacing was cut off a bolt and didn't come with directions, so I would appreciate advice from anyone who has already done this. TIA
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    Old 11-27-2010, 04:12 PM
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    Originally Posted by dunster
    I am tired of stitching batting together, but my bolt of batting is 90" wide and my quilt top is 102", so something must be done. I picked up some Pellon lightweight fusible interfacing, and I'm going to try fusing the batting pieces together. I'm using W&N batting. I will be quilting on my longarm. The plan is to cut 1.5" strips of the interfacing and apply to the batting - but that's as far as I've gotten in the thought process.

    I have some questions. Should I cut off the side edges of the batting before using it? Should I put a cloth (damp or otherwise?) over the interfacing (which is laid on top of the seam in the batting) before applying the iron? Should I fuse both sides together? Anything else I should know?

    This interfacing was cut off a bolt and didn't come with directions, so I would appreciate advice from anyone who has already done this. TIA
    I would lay a pressing cloth or just a piece of fabric over it so it doesn't stick to your iron. I would try doing a scrap piece first keeping track of how long it takes to adhere. And also try seeing if you need interfacing on both sides or just one. Let us know how it works. I did some a long long time ago and don't remember how it worked.
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    Old 11-27-2010, 04:14 PM
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    Will the interfacing stick to the batting? Will it survive washing/drying?
    I have not had great luck with fusible and warm and natural... so I am curious too :D:D:D
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    Old 11-27-2010, 04:15 PM
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    Im just wondering if you wouldnt be better off zig zaging it together on the machine. Wont the interfacing leave a stiffer section? Will it quilt out the same, or will it be noticeable? Im not sure, I would just hate to see it not turn out the way you want. Maybe try a test piece on some scraps? I hope it works out for you.
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    Old 11-27-2010, 04:18 PM
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    I was thinking maybe both sides? If one starts to release, the other may hold it down?
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    Old 11-27-2010, 04:24 PM
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    they have the interfacing on sale at Joanne's for 2.99..normally 9.99 a bolt...till tomorrow
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    Old 11-27-2010, 05:02 PM
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    I just zig zag mine.
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    Old 11-27-2010, 05:20 PM
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    Sounds like to much trouble for me... I will continue to zig zag.
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    Old 11-27-2010, 06:40 PM
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    I lay W&N pieces overlapping just a little bit and trim both layers. Remove the slivers & butt the big pieces together. Lay the interfacing over the joint and press. I use steam and an applique sheet (just because I have one) but you could use a scrap of muslin to keep the glue off your iron. THEN - I take it to my machine. Turn it over so that the fusible is on the bottom and zig-zag the joint. I use as wide a zig-zag as my machine does and a fairly open length. I like to reinforce the fusible - kinda like the fusible is holding everything together so you CAN sew it together.

    I use this method to put ALL my scrap W&N together into a usable size, I don't like to throw it away.
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    Old 11-28-2010, 03:51 AM
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    ok, i guess i am missing something here. if you are zig-zagging the batting together why are you using fusable too? seems like a waste...i would think one or the other would be the way to go, if you are stitching then don't waste the fusable; but i thought the original post was from someone who did not want to sew her batting pieces anymore. the problems with fusing the edges are: bulk if you overlap the pieces; stiffness along the seam; gumming up the needle when quilting (depending on what fusable was used) pressing such large pieces and getting them to stay together until you get it quilted. if you just go with the zig-zag it is done and going to hold up without lumps/bulk/stickiness/ problems with it not holding.
    Originally Posted by QuiltswithConvicts
    I lay W&N pieces overlapping just a little bit and trim both layers. Remove the slivers & butt the big pieces together. Lay the interfacing over the joint and press. I use steam and an applique sheet (just because I have one) but you could use a scrap of muslin to keep the glue off your iron. THEN - I take it to my machine. Turn it over so that the fusible is on the bottom and zig-zag the joint. I use as wide a zig-zag as my machine does and a fairly open length. I like to reinforce the fusible - kinda like the fusible is holding everything together so you CAN sew it together.

    I use this method to put ALL my scrap W&N together into a usable size, I don't like to throw it away.
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