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Thread: How much to charge?

  1. #1
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    How much to charge?

    I have someone who wants me to make them a lap quilt top (Yellow Brick Road pattern.55x63). I have no idea what to charge her for the top. I don't normally make tops to sell. Anyone have any idea what sounds fair? Thanks in advance.

    Please delete if not allowed.

  2. #2
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    Is she only wanting you to piece the top, or make the whole quilt? And is she providing the fabric?

  3. #3
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    According to what I've read is 3 times the amount of supplies, which I think is hard to do, but whatever you decide to charge, get a deposit of 50%.

  4. #4
    Senior Member gingerd's Avatar
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    Take her shopping to get the fabric for the top/back and the batting, then, figure out a price!
    **************
    Ginger
    ~stitching one thread at a time~

  5. #5
    Super Member meyert's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gingerd View Post
    Take her shopping to get the fabric for the top/back and the batting, then, figure out a price!
    this is a good way to go about it. then they see first hand the expense and if they buy things they are making a commitment in the project

  6. #6
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    Before you say yes, add up a heavy estimate for your time, materials, and other items. You can find out real quick if she expects a quilt for $50. I avoid a all costs being paid for a quilt. I prefer to give them to family and friends. Only Quilters know what truly goes into a quilt.

  7. #7
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    I bought some lovely fabric and showed my fellow co-worker. made the sun bonnet sue quilt and only asked $50.00. didn't cover all the fabric even. she turned the quilt down. sigh. Another co-worker bought it later though. so it will cost most likely more than she is thinking. for some reason, people think because you can make it, it's dirt cheap.

  8. #8
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    Kani, as some said, take them shopping for the fabrics. then you'll see how they will pay. DO NOT use coupons if she is with you. she MUST SEE the cost it will cost. otherwise, she'll think she needs to get a deal all around. good luck.
    put off till tomorrow what you can do today, and if you procrastinate long enough, you may never have to do it.

  9. #9
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    I think I would get more info before committing to making this - - -

    Cost of the pattern -

    Just the top?
    Or a finished quilt?

    You provide the materials?
    She provides the materials?

    You do the quiliting?
    Send it out?

    I think even some quilters are "shocked" when they actually figure out how much it costs to make a quilt - without even including the time and thought involved in creating one.

    Remember to include
    Consult time - contract writing time
    Fabric shopping time - and batting - and thread
    Fabric prep time
    Cutting and assembly time
    All sewing time
    Washing after completion time

    Also remember to include the "depreciation" of your tools

    If the person is "shopping from the stash" - figure "replacement cost" for the fabrics used.

  10. #10
    Super Member Boston1954's Avatar
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    Keep track of how many hours it takes you, and charge a fair price for your time.
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    I am from the South....39 miles south of Boston.

  11. #11
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    My advice, don't start doing this. "They" come out of the woodwork if "they" get wind of it.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kani View Post
    I have someone who wants me to make them a lap quilt top (Yellow Brick Road pattern.55x63). I have no idea what to charge her for the top. I don't normally make tops to sell. Anyone have any idea what sounds fair? Thanks in advance.

    Please delete if not allowed.
    This is interesting to me... most people don't want just tops! Is this person a quilter who doesn't like piecing? Have you made a YBR before (so that you know how long it will take)? I think the biggest question for me is if they will be supplying the fabric- that will have a huge impact on the price.

    YBR is a pretty simple pattern. I feel like I could whip that top out in a day, so I might charge a friend $100, someone else $200 (labor only). I haven't actually made one, though, so I might be dramatically underestimating the time required.

  13. #13
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    I have been making lap quilts for charity, simple 4-patch, rail fence etc. If someone gave me the fabric and asked for something simple I would ask for $60. for the top. Just to keep the hobby going, if they wanted it quilted then I would say $100. I retired so any $$ is better then nothing..that is just me.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Sophie2's Avatar
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    I usually figure out the cost of materials and then double the cost and round up from there. I like to make quilts for people who are willing to pay for them. If they don't want to pay the price, I don't make it. I have learned to take a 50% non-refundable deposit, as I have had some people change their minds.
    Sophie2

  15. #15
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    I get asked often how much I would charge for a quilt. When they say I'll give you $50, I tell them no. They don't want to pay and then if and when they do, they want to "make payments". I just say no. To me it isn't worth the aggravation. Also I'm not Eleanor, I don't do quilts in a day!

  16. #16
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    I charge $15 per hour for my sewing time. I explain to them that I pay one of my best friends $30 per hour to give my girls piano lessons...(which is a bargain for piano lessons) Teaching piano is a skill developed from many hours of practice... quilting is also a skill that many do not want to take the time to perfect. I look at it like this... if I'm not making at least $15 an hour to work for someone else, I may as well be working on my own projects.
    Last edited by Kris P; 07-13-2017 at 05:16 AM. Reason: add text

  17. #17
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    I just looked on Etsy for finished Yellow Brick Road quilts. Prices seem to be around $260-$480.

    https://www.etsy.com/search?q=yellow+brick+road+quilt

  18. #18
    Super Member ArtsyOne's Avatar
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    I've made only 2 quilts that were for "customers". There was no pleasing the first customer and I spent countless hours changing colors out, adding more batting, increasing the size with additional borders and in the end he balked at paying me even for the fabric. Several years later I again stupidly agreed to make a quilt for someone and frankly the joy in making a quilt was just taken out of it. I was paid generously, but had no fun in the making.
    Now I just make baby quilts or lap quilts and give them away to pregnant coworkers or to the local fire/rescue squad and get to make what I want, when I want and using whatever color or pattern I want. I would never again make a quilt for a "customer".
    A fabric stash is always missing that one fabric needed to finish the quilt on which you're working.

  19. #19
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    I have a lap quilt made with the Yellow Brick Road pattern in my living room and get lots of comments on how pretty it is and can you make me one. My answer for the Yellow Brick Road pattern in a lap size quilt is $300. No one who has asked the question has taken me up on making one which is a relief because I only quilt for myself

  20. #20
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    Absolutely show her the price breakdown BEFORE you start. Most people have no idea what the cost is. I sell both in a store and online. The two standard ways to price are 3 x's the product cost or the products cost + hourly cost (these also need to be adjusted for what the market will spend). My suggestion is you take her with you to purchase the fabric. She pays for it and then pays you for your labor. I try to never spend more than $3 per yard in order to recoup my costs. But, I spend a lot of time getting these fabrics (downtown fabric marts, online, huge sales, etc) because I do it as a business. Show her the fabric requirements for the fabric, give her an approximate time (if she doesn't know quilting, break it down - cutting, sewing etc.). The point is to educate her in what goes into making a quilt or even a quilt top BEFORE she commits to it. Many, many, many of us have been burned by folks thinking it was a simple, quick and inexpensive thing to throw a quilt together. And, as hard as it may seem, try to keep it fun, nothing worse than working on a project that has stopped being fun!

  21. #21
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    And no matter what you do, put it in writing!!! Doesn't have to be a formal document, but should contain your names & phone numbers, approx size of quilt, piecing pattern, who will pay for what, approx completion date. Also you should have a statement that the 50% deposit, or the purchase of the fabric is non-refundable if the buyer decides not to complete the purchase.
    both should sign it & each gets a copy.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  22. #22
    Super Member Jeanette Frantz's Avatar
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    If I am asked about making a quilt, my reply is, No, I don't make quilts for dollars, I make them for love! If I started making quilts for sale, the enjoyment I get from making a quilt for a gift would be gone. This is my hobby. not an income-producing project.

  23. #23
    Super Member kuntryquilter's Avatar
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    I charged a friend of mine $250, to make her a T-shirt quilt.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuntryquilter View Post
    I charged a friend of mine $250, to make her a T-shirt quilt.
    Kuntryquilter You earned every penny. I'm finishing up one for my husband as we speak. I didn't charge him though. Lol.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  25. #25
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    I tell people that I do not sell my quilts, but I will gladly show them how to make one. I would rather give my quilts as gifts or to charities. I do not know anyone that would be willing to pay me for my time.

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