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Thread: I live with a smoker and cats...

  1. #76
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    I have asthma and I can tell when the slightest bit of cigarette smoke has been near fabric. I had to stop going to the craft shows because I have a reaction to the smoke.

  2. #77
    Super Member JulieR's Avatar
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    Good grief, people! There's no need to be so RUDE!

    Attitudes can be stinky, too.

  3. #78
    Super Member Baloonatic's Avatar
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    I used to smoke. I got a forced air heating system installed. I smoked only in the family room, thinking one room was ok. But the smell would wake my DH in the early mornings, so we decided to only smoke outside. I was always aware which way the breeze was blowing so I stayed upwind of the smoke. Clothes still reeked.
    Got a haircut one day, they used deionized water to rinse it. They told me I must be a smoker since the smell was literally emanating from my scalp.
    Didn't smoke in my vehicle, yet there was still cigarette haze on the inside glass--from breathing out the residual that was always left in my lungs! Whatever I breathed on was exposed to cigarette smoke.
    Was in a quilting group for many years. One dear lady started to bring a neighbor with her, a smoker. She took a butt break every 20-30 minutes & never washed her hands. She reeked SO bad I had to just leave if she came.
    We quit smoking going on 6 years ago, never thought we could after over 30 years. Nicorette patch made it literally effortless.

  4. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by SUZAG
    I would love to make things and sell them but I am afraid that the smoke smell would linger. I would pre-wash my fabric and then wash again when finished and put into a large zip lock bag. I've heard storing things in plastic bags isn't a good thing to do either. Should I just give up on my ideas and only do things for myself?
    In your climate, you can get the fabric very dry in the dryer, let it cool, and store it folded in a very roomy large plastic sealed bag. You probably will not plan for it to be in there for a long time, but it will keep it fresh and clean.
    I have had some quilts in large roomy plastic bags for over a year, some longer, with no bad results.
    It is certainly is better than letting smoke smell get into the fabric, because trying to remove the smoke smell, could be harder on the fabric.
    It is moisture in the fabric sealed inside a confined bag in a warm humid climate that can do the damage.,
    After all - archarologists have found bits of fabric several thousands of years old, that have been in a sealed dry place in a dry climate - like your house inthe winter time.
    Jeannie

  5. #80
    Senior Member Grambi's Avatar
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    I agree with the advice to give it a go and be honest and up front about being a smoker and having a cat. I'm sure that there are a gazillion smoking, cat-owners out there. Good luck.

  6. #81
    Senior Member gypsylady5's Avatar
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    I usually wash my quilts when I'm finished making them and then put them away. I store my fabrics in plastic containers and they have kept the smoke smell and the cat dander away. I also have a dog, but I don't allow them to smoke or get in the fabrics. I lived with smokers most of my life and I'm so glad to get rid of that horrible smell. I made my husband smoke outside and never near me or my fabrics. I am sensitive to smells as well and migranes, so know how you feel. I just try to make things smell fresh when I use them. Go ahead and sell, but prewash and package for freshness. Keep the smokers out of your area!!!!!

  7. #82
    Super Member donna13350's Avatar
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    There are a lot of sellers on E-bay that sell large volumes of fabric, but the sellers with good ratings are honest...they always make a note if they have a smoker or a pet in the house, and that if this will bother you, then don't purchase. I think you can still sell your things, but be honest...free choice is what makes the world go round! Good luck to you.

  8. #83
    Super Member teacherbailey's Avatar
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    As long as you're upfront...."I smoke and have cats BUT wash everything when you buy it and then package it in a smokefree/catfree room" (or whatever makes sense), I'd say GO FOR YOUR DREAMS!!!!! I hate the smell of smoke, having been married to a smoker for over 20 years and raised by two smokers----but washing something a couple of times takes care of any smell.

  9. #84
    Junior Member rannyof3's Avatar
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    I'm a smoker, but smoke outside. Don't like the smell in my house....

  10. #85
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SUZAG
    I would love to make things and sell them but I am afraid that the smoke smell would linger. I would pre-wash my fabric and then wash again when finished and put into a large zip lock bag. I've heard storing things in plastic bags isn't a good thing to do either. Should I just give up on my ideas and only do things for myself?
    Do you smoke where you sew? I saw someone else ask that. Smoke does permeate clothes, and some people are highly intolerant or even allergic to it. If there are particles in the clothing, putting it in a ziploc bag would just seal it in (even after washing). I have read that you can put newspaper in the bag, or non-activated charcoal (found at the drug store) in there, or even put the cloth in the freezer. All of the above helps to remove odors.

    I think I would just sew in one room, and go out for a smoke break when necessary.

    My friend has cats. She thinks it is cute when her cats come to "visit me" even though she knows I am allergic. The same principle would work. Keep the cats out of your sewing room if you know someone might buy what you sell, or come to visit.

  11. #86
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    I'm a former smoker and was obsessed with having my house smell fresh and not smokey. Most people said they never knew I smoked, so I don't think my clothes smelled of smoke very much. That being said, my daughter would wash everything that I sent her and I would never have any gift I sent in a room that was smoked in. She wasn't bothered when she lived at home but after she got away from it, she could smell it a mile away. Some people are super sensitive to smoke and others it only bothers a little. And I think it depends what type of cigarettes they smoke also. I used a lot of Febreeze. I'd spray the drapes, the sofa, the carpet, the closets. I'd give selling your stuff a try, if you are doing it online tell them your situation and say you will launder right before you post it and it's up to them if it needs more laundering. And I agree with others I have purchased things at stores that had an odor and washed it as soon as I got inside the house.

  12. #87
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    Call me weird but I love the perfume/make up department myself! But then again my sister worked at Macy's for Lancombe and I would go see her all of the time. Since it was full of really hot females and they loved it when I came up to see her I was like the bell of the ball. :mrgreen: It seemed like they really liked the males perspective on things and what made them prettier or attractive to guys. I was like a kid in a candy store........

    Kinda like me in a fabric store I always have women fawn over me and go out of their way to help me find the things I am looking for.

    Billy

  13. #88
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    Personally, I have never noticed pet smells on anything I've bought. But as for selling, I don't have any pets in the house. So our home is completely smoke AND pet free.

  14. #89
    Super Member 3incollege's Avatar
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    I don't smoke, the smell bothers me, but that isn't going to stop me buying something from a smoker.
    When I get my quilts back from the long armer they smell bad.
    However, I set them outside use Fabreeze and then a few days later the quilt is fine.
    When you buy clothes do you wash them before you wear them? Do you know how many poeple have tried on those clothes or brought them back for return. I work retail,and some of the grossest people are in the dressing rooms.
    So if you want to sell your items, make them and we will figure on how to clean it.

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amythyst02
    You know I smoke, and I do smoke inside, its too darn hot outside, but.. I smoke in a completely different room than where I sew. I am sure there are folks that do smoke (although yes I know we should not) that would love to see what you have. As long as your honest and let folks know you do smoke I do not see why you could not try to sell things.
    I had a cleaning service for years and cleaned for a family who had a couple of smokers in it. They were only supposed to smoke in one room and I must tell you, it doesn't matter if you confine yourself to one room, the smoke travels and it gets to other rooms. I had the hardest time trying to clean walls in one room that they didn't smoke in, and the room they smoked in was awful. Finally they smoked outside on the day I was there to clean.
    But smoke travels and so does the smell and it gets into things even behind closed closet doors.

  16. #91
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I would just like to say, that I am a non smoker, and currently don't have pets. But, there are smokers and pet owners who do shop and maybe they can be part of the group that would buy your things. My mother smoked her entire life (cut short by the smoking but that's another topic) and she stunk, coughed, and we stunk until we moved out. She mostly smoked in the living room or kitchen, but it got all over the place. This was back in the day before such good air filters, fresheners, etc. Now I am very sensitive to the smell of smoke and avoid it completely. Me personally, I wouldn't buy from a smoker, and take the chance the smell wouldn't wash out.

  17. #92
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
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    I know the odor lingers, but if you launder things after they are finished, bag them like you suggestred, and put a dryer sheet in the bag they will be nice and fresh. Is there no way at all you can get him to smoke outdoors?

  18. #93
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    Remember back in the good old days it was normal way of life to smoke. I remember my mom and dad smoked up until I was in high school and then they quit when my grandfather hacked up his lung (coughing up blood) and hemorrhaged at the dinner table. He was way past the advanced stages of cancer. Thank goodness they are making laws to keep folks from smoking in public places and now their cars if kids are in there with them.

    So here was the mentality back in my parents day.......

    [img]http://www.quitsmokingpainlesslynow....ro%20Mummy.jpg[/img]

    [img]http://blueroof.files.wordpress.com/2007/09/smoking.png[/img]

    [img]http://www.theironsamurai.com/wp-con...Smoking_Ad.jpg[/img]

    Billy

  19. #94
    Super Member OHSue's Avatar
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    My husband used to smoke, I kept my fabrics on the floor where he never was smoking. I never allowed fabrics to sit on the first floor of the house, would take the bags to my sewing area immedeatly and kept that area closed off. I have never had a complaint about smell in anything.
    Now the cat is another story..... :-D

  20. #95
    Senior Member Tinabug's Avatar
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    I'm sensitive to smoke and fragrance. Everything I buy is unscented even my detergent and softener. Have you considered one of the hi-tek air filters? They are effective. Can you sew, quilt and store your materials in one room? If so a room air filter might be the solution, plus washing in unscented detergent. Just a thought. Good luck

  21. #96
    Super Member LivelyLady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flo Pierce
    I married and have lived with a smoker for 53 years and have sewed for others most of that time. I had a slipcover business at one time. I still sew for ladies and gents in a upper-crust living complex. I GET NO COMPLAINS. I do have a sewing
    room up stairs .
    My DH uses freebrez for his computer room. I just got a room
    deodorizer meant for pet smells. It is by Purina and is just a
    little glass jar with the stuff in it. It seems to really illemate the
    odars from my cats, the smoking and then we deal with a wood
    fire in the winter. Oh yes and my cooking. I am a retired cook
    and have trained as a dietition.
    Get a life !! Our world is full of all kinds of oders we don't like.
    I for one will not allow a little odar I don't like to dictate my daily life.

    Have a good one. It is your choice.
    Amen :thumbup:

  22. #97
    Super Member jlm5419's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy
    Smoke does linger and sensitive noses would be aware of it. Allergy suffers would be able to tell as well. Perhaps the smoker can smoke outside? Hope you work this out (smile).
    I tried convincing my late DH to smoke outside, but he would stand in the doorway with the door open to smoke. The smell of course, made it inside.
    :(
    So, if you want to make things for others, mention that you live with a smoker and cats. There are smokers out there that wouldn't be bothered by the lingering smell, and aren't allergic to cats.

  23. #98
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    I must totally agree that full disclosure is your answer. I am one that is extremely allergic to smoke; thankfully not pets! :-) I have on very rare occasions purchased fabric from up-front smokers-I have to have someone else open the package and toss it in the washer though. I recently opened a package that was from a smoking home, and I immediately had to grab my inhaler. I've been happier.
    As a seller, I always disclose that I have a pet friendly home. I could no more ban my dog from my craft shed than cut my arm off. She does not have access to my fabric or finished items. Thankfully, 99.9% of my customers are pet owners, so I don't think it's been a hindrance to me.
    Give it a try! Just be honest as to what possible allergens are in your house. Have fun, and best wishes! :thumbup:

  24. #99
    Super Member donnalynett's Avatar
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    I am a smoker and I always respect the rights of non-smokers even though I know they can smell me coming. There is no smoking allowed in our house. I am fortunate enough to have a "former" bedroom dedicated for fabric. The cat is not allowed in there, however he is always at my side while I am sewing. I can hardly breathe due to my bad habit, other people's perfume, scented candles, etc..... My husband is also a smoker. We smoke in our garage which is located on the other end of the property. Since I only do charity quilts I buy almost all my fabric at garage/yard/estate sales and the putrid musty stinch from being improperly stored for years sometimes will not wash out no matter what I use. I haven't had any problem with getting cigarette smoke out of fabric but wood smoke doesn't seem to wash out. I have had cats for 62 years and I have never noticed a smell from any of them??? Just be honest about the cat and tobacco and I bet you will sell your items.

  25. #100
    Super Member Lv2sew2011's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo
    It must be horrible to have to be on constant guard to avoid smells that cause bad headaches. Is it from a low immune system? What does the Dr. say? My eyes water when around new bolts of fabrics or a strong perfume smell in a close area but never a headache.
    Something in that fabric that your allergic to! My eyes water and my nose swells if I get near something I'm allergic to.

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