Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: I made so much extra work for myself

  1. #1
    Senior Member hheelleenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Port Saint Lucie, Florida
    Posts
    421

    I made so much extra work for myself

    I recently fell in love with strip quilting. I was making the "heart strings" pattern. All was going very well. Squared up @ block PERFECT. Then I machine basted all the blocks together according to pattern. I constantly paid attention to layout so as not to have a problem. Then I laid out @ row, again referring to pattern. A-okay. It was good wow, seams lined up PERFECT. Then I started to machine baste the rows. I got 5 rows basted when I realized that I hadn't stitched over the basting putting the blocks together. I debated weather to leave it machine basted but continue with the rest. I was on the fence.I couldn't just sew between the blocks because when I sewed the rows together I did not press and sew the seams open but to one side. Ultimatly, I got my seam ripper out and started removing the machine basting putting the rows together so I could stitch the blocks. After almost 45 mins I was still pulling out the machine basted stitches on the first one!
    My question is, since I did machine baste the blocks together do you think I could leave it like that ? Or do I continue to rip? A lesson learned. Frustrating.

  2. #2
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    Posts
    13,665
    I would take out the basting sewing the rows together but leave the basting between the original blocks in the row. Then stitch the blocks in each row together with a normal stitch length. The long machine basting stitch will not hold the quilt together through normal use.

    However, I'm confused by the fact that it is taking so long to remove the machine basted stitches. If they are basting stitches, they should be pretty big and should come out quickly. Cut every 4th or 5th stitch and then pull on the thread on the other side - should just come right out.

  3. #3
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sturbridge, Ma
    Posts
    4,010
    I don't understand what you mean by "machine basted the blocks together". Do you mean you put the blocks together with a long basting stitch before sewing them together. this sounds like it. If this is the case then the basting stitches will not hold in hard use.

  4. #4
    Senior Member hheelleenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Port Saint Lucie, Florida
    Posts
    421
    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    I would take out the basting sewing the rows together but leave the basting between the original blocks in the row. Then stitch the blocks in each row together with a normal stitch length. The long machine basting stitch will not hold the quilt together through normal use.

    However, I'm confused by the fact that it is taking so long to remove the machine basted stitches. If they are basting stitches, they should be pretty big and should come out quickly. Cut every 4th or 5th stitch and then pull on the thread on the other side - should just come right out.
    Answers my question. I know the basting should come right out but maybe because there's two layers of fabric. One the foundation and two the fabric. Maybe because I'm annoyed at myself. All was going too fine.

  5. #5
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    18,358
    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    I would take out the basting sewing the rows together but leave the basting between the original blocks in the row. Then stitch the blocks in each row together with a normal stitch length. The long machine basting stitch will not hold the quilt together through normal use.

    However, I'm confused by the fact that it is taking so long to remove the machine basted stitches. If they are basting stitches, they should be pretty big and should come out quickly. Cut every 4th or 5th stitch and then pull on the thread on the other side - should just come right out.
    Ditto that!!!

  6. #6
    Super Member tjradj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    London, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,328
    Blog Entries
    1
    We've all learned things the hard way. Welcome to the club. At any rate, lessons learned this way are seldom forgotten! Cheer up. It will work out.
    I used to be "hot", now it's just "hot flashes!"

  7. #7
    Super Member b.zang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    2,023
    Blog Entries
    1
    I can't say I've ever basted a whole quilt together before sewing, but I've often basted in order to hold things together while sewing a shorter stitch. There's a perverse kind of pleasure in ripping out the basting threads because they bunch up the piece so it looks a mess, then - pop! - out they come and the piece goes back to flat. I can understand it would be difficult to remove the basting threads if you've sewed right over top of them since the stitching would hold them in. Those threads should cause no trouble for you; at worst they will work loose and need to be snipped occasionally. If this was my quilt top, I'd leave the basting stitches in unless they are causing puckering.
    Barbara

    Samuel Johnson - Few things are impossible to diligence and skill. Great works are performed, not by strength but by perseverance.

  8. #8
    Super Member GingerK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,563
    I have a question--why bother basting everything first?? If you have squared up your blocks, they should fit together quite well and if they don't, you'd have to open them anyway. To me, basting is just extra work and waste of thread because it is not strong enough to stand up to wear and tear.
    Never argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down the their level and beat you with experience.

  9. #9
    Senior Member pinkberrykay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    SOO, MI
    Posts
    825
    Im a newbie so I am confused and can't picture what in the world she is talking about.

  10. #10
    Senior Member ChaiQuilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    496
    Try using non-permanent fabric glue next time instead of machine basting. It will wash out.

  11. #11
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Hampstead N.C.
    Posts
    1,708
    Blog Entries
    1
    I don't baste, try just locking the blocks together next time and use pins.
    Create something beautiful from scraps.

  12. #12
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Enid, OK
    Posts
    8,922
    Blog Entries
    1
    I never baste...just PIN..and work in small batches...IE: if your quilt is say 24 blocks across and 24 blocks down then divide that into "blocks" of 4 blocks...make a 4 block section then move onto the next 4 block section, etc...then again, make larger 4 block sections, and continue..it makes it MUCH easier to get the top done and more accurately lined up then wrestling with rows!

  13. #13
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    2,304
    Quote Originally Posted by pinkberrykay View Post
    Im a newbie so I am confused and can't picture what in the world she is talking about.
    Pinkberrykay, A basting stitch is a very long stitch that sewers use at times to make sure that things stay together until a more permanent stitch is put in. Usually it is 3 or 4 stitches to the inch where regular stitching is 10-12 stitches in an inch. Does that help? Also, people baste stitch the 3 layers together instead of pinning or spray basting...

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    HOME is SE Missouri
    Posts
    410
    if your "machine basting" is stitched that well I would say you did sew it

  15. #15
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    34,146
    I never baste anything together, use to when I made clothing. You need to sew the blocks together with a closer stitch length. Just do it and figure it as a learning thing. Maybe you will remember to sew them after the basting.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Vinton, Louisiana
    Posts
    40
    It is frustrating, but that is how we learn. We have all been there ... and many of us will be there again.
    Laissez les bons temps rouler! Or, as we say in south Louisiana:
    Let the Good Times Roll!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.