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Thread: I think I'm looking for a needle in a haystack.

  1. #1
    Senior Member incoming2me's Avatar
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    I bought a Singer 40k hand crank on ebay for DD4 to start to learn to sew.
    Thought it would be a GREAT plan.

    Well.. it would be a great plan, if I could find these apparently morphadite needles.

    Cat.1113 Class 24x3 size 11

    I've found only one reference to where these might possibly be purchased...and it's from 2009.

    Anyone have any leads on where these might be found?
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Power Poster Lacelady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by incoming2me
    I bought a Singer 40k hand crank on ebay for DD4 to start to learn to sew.
    Thought it would be a GREAT plan.

    Well.. it would be a great plan, if I could find these apparently morphadite needles.

    Cat.1113 Class 24x3 size 11

    I've found only one reference to where these might possibly be purchased...and it's from 2009.

    Anyone have any leads on where these might be found?
    Thanks!
    Ask Billy (lostn51), he is our resident guru on vintage machines.
    Or try a post here: http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-43881-1294.htm.

  3. #3
    Super Member tammy cosper's Avatar
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    did you check ebay for the needles? I have gotten some needles from there for my ooooold machines.

  4. #4
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    I bet Organ makes them, but they are numbered different now. Try here: http://www.allbrands.com/products/abc0609.html
    I didn't see your size listed, but call or e-mail them with the machine and they may know the substitution number made now. I have ordered a couple odd things from them and they are good to work with.

  5. #5
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    There's a pretty comprehensive needle chart at ISMACS:
    http://www.ismacs.net/needle_and_sha...edle-list.html

    According to this chart, the Singer 40 takes ordinary 15x1 needles. Has your model 40 been modified to take the 24x1? Or maybe it came with a manual for the model 24? That one does take the 24x1 needle.

  6. #6
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    why did you buy a hand crank. There are so many good old electric ones available. I don't believe you will learn having to crank with one hand and guide with the other.

  7. #7
    Super Member Connie in CO's Avatar
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    I agree with Holice,you need 2 hands to sew with.

  8. #8
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    I know a lady who has only one arm and she sews and knits, cooks and has done all her own yard work.

  9. #9
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    My dd was about 8yo when she wanted to learn to sew, but she was afraid of the electric machines. She *loved* the hand crank and made me promise never to sell it or give it away.

  10. #10
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
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    Ewecan sew: Where there's a will, there's a way! She should go for it!
    peace :D

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Holice
    why did you buy a hand crank. There are so many good old electric ones available. I don't believe you will learn having to crank with one hand and guide with the other.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4PhAT--SKM

    Our own member Muv (UK) sews on these machines. I always thought what you thought. But, there is no vibration with these machines, fabric feeds smoothly with one hand, while you crank.

  12. #12
    Super Member sewwhat85's Avatar
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    here is a web site that tells what needle is needed http://www.singersewinginfo.co.uk/needles/ and it is a regular size sewing machine needle the way i read it

  13. #13
    Senior Member incoming2me's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewwhat85
    here is a web site that tells what needle is needed http://www.singersewinginfo.co.uk/needles/ and it is a regular size sewing machine needle the way i read it
    There's just a blank space next to 40k on the chart.
    I had already found this site before posting. :(


    I wonder if the 24x1 will work in place of the 24x3?

    If I've read correctly, the flat side is opposite of the 24x1.
    If the needle is installed with the flat side in the correct position, would it be any different?
    I've never seen these two needles, much less seen them side by side.

  14. #14
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    Repeating this in case you missed it:

    Quote Originally Posted by thepolyparrot
    There's a pretty comprehensive needle chart at ISMACS:
    http://www.ismacs.net/needle_and_sha...edle-list.html

    According to this chart, the Singer 40 takes ordinary 15x1 needles. Has your model 40 been modified to take the 24x1? Or maybe it came with a manual for the model 24? That one does take the 24x1 needle.
    Is your machine a model 40?

    If so, you might want to at least try a standard home sewing machine needle, since two sources tell us that the model 40 takes that needle.

  15. #15
    Senior Member incoming2me's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thepolyparrot
    Repeating this in case you missed it:

    Quote Originally Posted by thepolyparrot
    There's a pretty comprehensive needle chart at ISMACS:
    http://www.ismacs.net/needle_and_sha...edle-list.html

    According to this chart, the Singer 40 takes ordinary 15x1 needles. Has your model 40 been modified to take the 24x1? Or maybe it came with a manual for the model 24? That one does take the 24x1 needle.
    Is your machine a model 40?

    If so, you might want to at least try a standard home sewing machine needle, since two sources tell us that the model 40 takes that needle.
    Thanks, but no, mine is not a 40, it is a 40K.
    (look under the listing for a "Sew Handy" toy machine)
    The ISMACS list shows the 24x1 but...
    According to the 40K manual it takes a "Cat. 1113 Class 24x3 Size 11" needle.
    :(
    Link to the manual:
    http://www.hammerwall.com/Manuals/Si...l/39_model40k/

    The machine is somewhere in transit.
    When I get it, I may know a bit more.
    I'll try the 24x1 needles.. *cross my fingers*

    I'm just trying to have things prepared ahead of its arrival!

    Singer 40K hand crank toy sewing machine - as it was posted on ebay.
    Name:  Attachment-224339.jpe
Views: 78
Size:  29.3 KB

  16. #16
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    Well, the good news is that it's a cute little display piece if you love the 400 & 500 series sewing machines.

    The bad news is that even with the correct needle, trying to sew with one of these machines is so frustrating that it could put someone off of sewing forever. :(

    There are some "Sew Handy" models that produce a very nice chain stitch - the model 20, if I'm remembering right - but this one has a reputation for being impossible. I'm pretty sure that I had one of these when I was a little girl.

    With the case, though, and in the condition it's in, it's a darling little collector's piece. I would buy it in a minute. :)

    A hand crank is a great machine for a youngster to learn on - it's not as intimidating as an electric machine and the child can sew as slowly as necessary to keep control of the seam. An antique 28/128 or a more modern 99 or Spartan are all easily convertible 3/4 sized machines if they're not already configured as a hand crank. (I've seen dozens of 28/128's for sale over the last few years and all of them were equipped with hand cranks except for one 128 treadle which I bought. :) )

    The toy machines, unfortunately, rarely function as a real sewing machine. Kind of like the toy irons we had when I was a little girl. They got warm when you plugged them in, but not hot enough to actually iron with them.

    I bought a small Janome for my 8 year old granddaughter to sew on - it has a slow-fast switch and the size isn't intimidating. It's the same machine as the Hello Kitty models, just painted in "big girl" colors. Lots of people buy this machine to take to classes and retreats because they sew so well and they weigh so little. :)

    Good luck - it's a really cute set!

  17. #17
    Senior Member incoming2me's Avatar
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    Well phooey, I was really hoping that this one, being a hand crank, would be easy for her to use.
    The modern plastic battery powered one I bought for her at Joann's was a complete piece of poop... and LOUD as all get out.

    I have plans of cleaning up my Great-Grandmother's Singer 15 treadle head and adding the "bolt-on" hand crank attachment for her to learn on.
    I just thought that the little machine wouldn't be as intimidating.

    I have a pristine 1923 model 99 hand crank, but don't feel all that comfortable letting her learn on it!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  18. #18
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    I absolutely LOVE that machine...I've never seen one before. Wish I had that on family camping trips as a child. Always have loved to sew and most trips did not involve electricity. (Was a long time ago) That machine would have made so much sense!!! Good for you, enjoy teaching your little one.

  19. #19
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    I absolutely LOVE that machine...I've never seen one before. Wish I had that on family camping trips as a child. Always have loved to sew and most trips did not involve electricity. (Was a long time ago) That machine would have made so much sense!!! Good for you, enjoy teaching your little one.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by incoming2me
    ... snip...I have a pristine 1923 model 99 hand crank, but don't feel all that comfortable letting her learn on it!
    why?

  21. #21
    Senior Member incoming2me's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltmouse
    Quote Originally Posted by incoming2me
    ... snip...I have a pristine 1923 model 99 hand crank, but don't feel all that comfortable letting her learn on it!
    why?
    My preference.
    Extreme comparison here..
    but to me, I guess it would be like having a young violinist learn on a Stradivarius instead of a beginner model.
    This machine is 78 years old and although cast iron, is not indestructible.:)

  22. #22
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    :) -- I'm not a cat, but eternally curious.

  23. #23

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    The 24x3 is definitely obsolete and has not been available anywhere for many years.

    I checked the singersewinginfo site and there is a special page explaining all about the 24x3 needles at http://www.singersewinginfo.co.uk/toys/24x3/

    I think it will answer all your questions and it even tells you how to use a subsitute!

    I tried it and it worked perfectly on my little Sewhandy 40K.

  24. #24
    Senior Member incoming2me's Avatar
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    Thanks for this info!
    I'm going to try the 24x1's. :)

  25. #25
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    http://www.singersewinginfo.co.uk/to...r40kthreading/

    Here is some information I found about your new machine as well as info about the needles at the bottom of the page. Hope it is helpful

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