Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 59

Thread: Is this idea just too crazy?

  1. #1
    Super Member Krisb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Asheville, previously Lake Vermilion, Tarpon Springs
    Posts
    1,402
    Blog Entries
    29

    Is this idea just too crazy?

    I have been working on blocks that were originally made by my aunt. She went into the nursing home in 1968, so they are at least that old. After some work, I have the blocks laying flat. And thr background squares cut. Here's what they look like now:

    Name:  image.jpg
Views: 4089
Size:  220.8 KB

    There doesn't seem to be enough contrast between the background and the blades. Also, the edges are so fragile and frayed that I don't think I can turn them under. Could do raw edge, or could try a offbeat idea. What trim did people use a lot of in the 50's and 60's? Rick rack. Is it insane to cover the outer edges with rainbow rick rack?
    I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it difficult to plan the day.

    Kris

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Maine-ly Florida
    Posts
    3,896
    I'll be interested to hear other people's opinions. I don't think I'd do rainbow rick rack but a dark red trim maybe with a gold accent might look really sharp. You'd have to test for color fastness, 'though.

  3. #3
    Senior Member fatquarters's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    845
    Blog Entries
    2
    I think I would do a buttonhole stitch in a contrasting color to define them. I think many dresdens were finished like that anyway
    fatquarters

  4. #4
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Corpus Christi, Tx.
    Posts
    15,972
    Blog Entries
    3
    I have to agree with lots2do. The bold and brightness are there for rainbow. Do you have any other colors for the background blocks. A darker color that would make the plates/blades pop and you wouldn't have to worry about ric rac. Otherwise the red and gold would be ok. Imho.

  5. #5
    Super Member mike'sgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    starke,Florida
    Posts
    2,014
    Can you fuse them to a stabilizer and them trim that up even with the edges of the blades and then turn them under ?

  6. #6
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Knot Merrill, Southern Indiana
    Posts
    5,805
    I like the idea of a buttonhole stitch to define them. Pretty blocks. Good luck!
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  7. #7
    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    8,662
    Blog Entries
    1
    Buttonhole stitch gets my vote too.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    326
    I also think buttonhole stitch would look good.
    Pat

    Pfaff 7510, Viking Mega Quilter, Viking Quilt Designer II, Singer Treadle

    http://craftypat.blogspot.com/

  9. #9
    Super Member juneayerza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Clovis California
    Posts
    2,256
    You could also use a very small satin stitch around the edges.
    June

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    1,803
    I have been toying with the idea of using one of the fancy machine designs on my machine to do edging instead of buttonhole. I would make the quilt (or quilt in strips) and use the design as the quilting and finishing of edges. Haven't had time to try it as yet. Has anyone else done it? Is it possible? It would be pretty on the plates. It would have to be a design that goes into the "leaves" to hold them, but close enough so that there are not too many frayed edges. (or use fray block first) Lot of things to think about before just jumping into it. That is why I haven't done it yet.

  11. #11
    Super Member Billi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Green Valley AZ
    Posts
    2,572
    Something that could help is a dark center instead of the same color as the background.
    As for the plate edges I would use a fusable webbing like wonder under or something like it to fuse it to your background then finish it with either a decrotive stitch by hand or your machine. I would not use Ricrac it would take away from your very pretty blades and be very difficult and bulky since it is not a biased product it will not bend and turn smoothly. If you really want to cover the plate edge how about a cording instead.
    Billi
    It's never too late to have a happy childhood

  12. #12
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    6,547
    buttonhole stitch gets my vote also.
    Suzanne
    Asking a seamstress to mend is like asking Picasso to paint your garage.

  13. #13
    Super Member faykilgore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    1,483
    I agree with the fusible stabilizer like Wonder under. Zigzag was very popular in that era. A small zigzag along the edges would work.
    Fay

    "You can't help that. We're all mad here." - The Cheshire Cat from Alice in Wonderland.

  14. #14
    Super Member jclinganrey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    3,026
    Stabilize then buttonhole stitch is my vote. You might discover that, after using a stabilizer, you'll be able to turn under the edges after all. Please post pictures of your final decision.


    Jane
    Jane

  15. #15
    Super Member Kassaundra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Rural Oklahoma
    Posts
    5,251
    If I did the rick rack I would choose a color like red or black or another single color that would work. My concern w/ the heavy stitch options would be the age and condition of the fabric, I would think a heavy stitch would cause fabric to tear, not sure if the stabilizing would help w/ that, but I think it might, just not sure if it would help enough.

    Are you committed to the background fabric??
    "Never cruel, nor cowardly, never give up, never give in."

    Let's take care of the Earth, it is the only planet that for sure has Chocolate.

    Sonic screwdrivers, fez, bow ties, and Stetsons are cool.

  16. #16
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    The Deep South near Cajun Country, USA
    Posts
    4,071
    I would consider using a stabilizer that you sew around the edges of the fans, and then turn them inside out. That would put all raw edges to the inside. Then you could use any stitch you wanted to frame the edges. Sometimes, simpler is better. I'd practice on another fan and see what you like. I would not use rick-rack. It is too bulky and works great for straight edges, but not so good for all those points. I would choose a center medallion color and do the stitching around the fans in that color, or in the darkest color you have in the quilt colors.
    Sew a Little, Love a Lot & Live like you were dying!

  17. #17
    Super Member charsuewilson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,202
    I think they look good as is. A buttonhole stitch wouldn't look bad, though.
    Sue Wilson

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Newnan, Georgia
    Posts
    627
    I would spray starch and iron them until they have stability. unpick about 1/4 inch on the end of the points just enough to turn under and stitch down. I would choose a solid fabric for the center, [if you do not have that already] and make a circle or even yo yo's to fill the center. I like the light background fabric. It makes the blades in the design stand out.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    696
    Another thing to consider is making the edges round instead of pointy. I have dresdens done both ways. That way you would probably have enough fabric to turn under, and you would not need to use stabilizer, etc. Just make a small plastic pattern so they all match. If you use that certain plastic, you could iron the edges under, ready to applique. I don't know the name of that heat resistant plastic but it is good. Then you could applique using any of the mentioned methods. Best of luck in doing whatever you decide.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Terri D.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    462
    If you want a finished edge, do the Eleanor Burns thing and cut a piece of lightweight fusible web larger than the Dresden Plate unit. Lay the web bumpy side up on your table and center the Dresden Plate unit on top, right side down. Pin to secure and stitch all the way around. Trim the edge to within 1/8" and then cut a slit in the middle of the back of the web and turn right side out, shaping the points for each one. Fuse the Dresden Plate unit to your background square.

    You now have a finished edge which you can stitch down with a straight, zig-zag, button hole or blind hem stitch, by machine or by hand.

  21. #21
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    St. Augustine, Fl and Nashville, Ga.
    Posts
    267
    I have appliqué quilts my grandmother made in the 60's and they have the button hold stitch in black. Her fabric prints also became meshed together because of the colors but the black made them pop. Good luck this is a tough decision.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Michellesews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    El Paso Texas
    Posts
    988
    Roc Rak would not work with all the angels and truns. I would use a dark background, black or navy...,navy was very popular in that time period. Then I would use a close blanket or appliqué stitch. You could also fuse some lightweight stabilizer on the back of the fan blades and trim around the edges evenly. This will all but eliminate the fraying. Be sure to post when you complete it, would love to see it.
    Michelle Guadarrama

  23. #23
    Senior Member kristijoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    California
    Posts
    585
    Quote Originally Posted by mike'sgirl View Post
    Can you fuse them to a stabilizer and them trim that up even with the edges of the blades and then turn them under ?
    I like the buttonhole (or specialty stitch) idea too, but I'm also wondering weather a stabilizer or even some lightweight interfacing might help keep everything together.
    Kristi

  24. #24
    Power Poster Boston1954's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East Oklahoma - pining for Massachusetts
    Posts
    10,473
    Do you have your heart set on this background? I would like to how it would look with a medium or dark brown.
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    I am from the South....39 miles south of Boston.

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Durango CO
    Posts
    955
    I picked up some Dresden Plates at the thrift store that were hand pieced. Just the Dresden blades so I need to put them on fabric squares. Because the hand piecing is a little loose, I am going to use the method Terri D posted & then use a blanket stitch. That way the plate seams will also be stabilized.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.