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Thread: If you let starch dry before pressing...

  1. #1
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    doesn't it take hours to iron a big piece, like a backing or yardage? Or do you worry about it only on cut pieces?

  2. #2
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    From the time you first spray it until dries could take an hour or so but you normally wouldn't be sitting there waiting for it to dry. You'd be working on another project or doing some other chore. I like to pre-wash all my fabric for a specific project at one time. I don't necessariy starch it at one time though--especially not the backing. The backing is done right before I get ready to load it on the frame & that might be weeks, months or for a couple quilts--years--before I choose or piece the backing. It really doesn't take that long for the starch to dry anyway so if you want to sit & wait--you could browse through your patterns or pull fabric for your next project while you wait. It doesn't have to be dry as a bone--just not soaking wet or it will flake and possibly scorch.

  3. #3
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    So you spray the whole thing at once? When I'm ironing, I just spray the part that is on the top of my ironing board.

  4. #4
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    I make my own cornstarch mixture so I can be generous. I put my
    fabric in a bucket, pour the mixture a little at a time until it gets
    everywhere. Turn the fabric over/under a few times to make sure
    the starch is evenly distributed. After 30 mins I let it air dry until
    it's damp then iron with a cloth on top so my iron doesn't stick.
    When it's almost dry then I remove the cloth and finish ironing.
    Oh and now I have a handy dandy rack to drape my fabric over
    so it's not on the floor. :-D

  5. #5
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I soak mine pretty good with starch, I hang it over a expandable bar in the hall way. Spray and then I flip it over and get the other side. If I am in a hurry, I turn a fan on it :wink:

  6. #6
    Super Member RkayD's Avatar
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    I spray my whole piece with starch and let it soak into the fabric for a few minutes...then I iron opposite whatever side I sprayed..then flip it over and repeat. Its amazing what starch does to help with cutting. I learned this from Sharon Schamber. I also learned to even up the fold the Fon's & Porter way. I struggled with accuracy before I learned these simple techniques. Now everything is easy peasy.

  7. #7
    Super Member justwannaquilt's Avatar
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    I either spray with starch or I "soak" the fabric in starch, then I hang it up and let it dry with a fan on low blowing on it, when I get around to ironing (ya know life happens just as soon as you start doing something) I just use steam, and it allows the fabric to be stiff yet it softens it enough to get the creases out. I read one time that you can spray your fabric and then fold it up and put it in a zip lock bag for 30 minutes or so. then pull it out and iron it, this will keep you from getting starch flakes on your fabric!


    I stear clear of spraying as I go to avoid scorched starch/fabric.

  8. #8
    tooMuchFabric's Avatar
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    I get mine soaked in starch water, then put it in the dryer to spin out as much water as possible, and then put into dryer.


    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPeezy
    I make my own cornstarch mixture so I can be generous. I put my
    fabric in a bucket, pour the mixture a little at a time until it gets
    everywhere. Turn the fabric over/under a few times to make sure
    the starch is evenly distributed. After 30 mins I let it air dry until
    it's damp then iron with a cloth on top so my iron doesn't stick.
    When it's almost dry then I remove the cloth and finish ironing.
    Oh and now I have a handy dandy rack to drape my fabric over
    so it's not on the floor. :-D

  9. #9
    Super Member scowlkat's Avatar
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    Ronna, what is Fon's and Porter's way to fold, if you don't mind. I have tried to find it on the internet without success.

  10. #10
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tooMuchFabric
    I get mine soaked in starch water, then put it in the dryer to spin out as much water as possible, and then put into dryer.


    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPeezy
    I make my own cornstarch mixture so I can be generous. I put my
    fabric in a bucket, pour the mixture a little at a time until it gets
    everywhere. Turn the fabric over/under a few times to make sure
    the starch is evenly distributed. After 30 mins I let it air dry until
    it's damp then iron with a cloth on top so my iron doesn't stick.
    When it's almost dry then I remove the cloth and finish ironing.
    Oh and now I have a handy dandy rack to drape my fabric over
    so it's not on the floor. :-D
    I've tried the dryer once but all the starch was gone after that. :-(
    Do you use cornstarch also?

  11. #11
    tooMuchFabric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPeezy
    I've tried the dryer once but all the starch was gone after that. :-(
    Do you use cornstarch also?
    Yes, I started making my own starch after reading about it here on the board.
    I do find it has to be much stronger solution if I use the dryer, you are right.
    So if you can hang the fabric out somewhere (wish I had a clothesline) you can use less cornstarch.
    .

  12. #12
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
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    I spray my fabric several pieces with store bought starch...
    wait a little for it to soak in...
    then iron while it's still damp.
    Works just fine for me.

  13. #13
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    I spray whatever I'm going to work on, put in a plastic bag and let it soak for a minimum of 2 hours, overnight is even better, then I either put it in the dryer for a few minutes or let it air dry before I iron it.

  14. #14
    Super Member RkayD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scowlkat
    Ronna, what is Fon's and Porter's way to fold, if you don't mind. I have tried to find it on the internet without success.
    I always tried to even up my fabric by putting my selvages even. Who knew fabric could be "off grain"? While reading an article by Fon's & Porter in the book Basic Guide to Rotary Cut Quilts ~You hold your piece up straight and slide the fabric until your fabric hangs straight. I Always iron out the fold first. There are pictures in the book that show what to do. It was a light bulb moment for me and took care of alot of my problems I was having with accuracy.

  15. #15
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
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    See, this is why I don't like to starch. By the time it is dry I am on to another project and my mind is all off that one. I don't like UFO's so I don't starch the backings. I must confess though that I did starch flannel the night before I planned on cutting it out.

  16. #16
    tooMuchFabric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RkayD
    You hold your piece up straight and slide the edges of the fabric sideways until your fabric hangs straight.
    This is right!!
    And now, at this point, there is another thing you can do to not only get straight lines in your cut, but make your piece smaller so your rulers will fit your cut - You don't always have to have a 22 or 24 inch ruler!
    Here's what you do:
    Now that you have your selvedges together, and the fabric is hanging straight as explained above, take the fold edge and fold it up again, but not all the way to the top of the selvedge, maybe only 6 or 10 inches or so.
    Then measure at 3 or 4 places along these 2 fold lines. When you get the same measurement in all the places you measure (it can be 6-3/4", or 7-1/8", or 9", or 10-1/2", as long as they are all the same),

    *****then your fabric is squared up and your cut strips will be spot-on.

    2-fold square cut
    Name:  Attachment-95944.jpe
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  17. #17
    Super Member sewingladydi's Avatar
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    I dry it in the dryer after I spray it and iron it after it is dry. It's doesn't take the stiffness out of it.

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