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Thread: the IKEA machine

  1. #26
    Senior Member leighway's Avatar
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    Jacquie, I love that you want to pass along our skills to the next generation!! Went to Walmart and found this for about $10 more than the Ikea machine (I LOVE Ikea, by the way) http://www.walmart.com/ip/Brother-17...chine/17039055.
    When I was shopping for a starter machine for my granddaughter, I bought her a Brother and I liked the quality for the price. You're doing a good thing and all of us will surely think of you in the the future, teaching those little girls something that will go with them for the rest of their lives!!

  2. #27
    Junior Member shelrox's Avatar
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    I agree I would look for a singer 99 k or even a regular singer for them to learn on. Hopefully they will get hooked and at that age they could operate a real machine. I have taught children from 5 years and up on a regular full size machine and glad i did for they never would have been happy with a "toy" one.

    [/I]
    Quote Originally Posted by barri1 View Post
    To be honest, I would look for a Singer 99k.. It's not as cute, but it will continue to work for them.. Forever...

  3. #28
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    Pass on this one. There are plenty of machines (look at allbrands.com) that are brand name with 10 yr. or more warranties and made better with more features for a few dollars more. Check out the Janome Harmony 1017S 10/17Stitch Sewing Quilting Machine Buttonhole MetalCasting&BobbinCase 11Lb...it is $99 with a discount coupon, $94 and free shipping. The Ikea one looks plastic, cheap....may not hold up to very much use. BTW there are other machines on the site listed above for $69 as well...they look better than this one when you read the description. Wonderful that you are helping these kids learn the value of creating and sewing. Suggestion, contact your local quilt guild and see if members have a machine or two they would donate to this endeavor....bet you would get many donations....maybe fabric as well.
    Diana in TX

  4. #29
    Super Member MaggieLou's Avatar
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    Why not get the Janome Sew-Mini? It's a better machine for about the same price.
    Margaret

    "If the devil could dance in empty pockets, he'd have a ball in mine."

    Life is a coin. You can spend it any way you wish but you can only spend it once.

  5. #30
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
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    Jacquie, I just want to say that it is so kind of you to spend time with these girls and also teach them a fun hobby. Your attention to them may have a life long positive influence in their lives. Good luck and God bless you.
    jean

  6. #31
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    I agree with the others. There's not much more frustrating for a child that is learning than to have less than adequate tools. That's not too say that this machine this is not good, because I don't really know. But I think it would be better to get a good quality used machine that works well, so it will do a good job as they get better and need a "bigger" machine. Also don't forget good scissors . They are so lucky to have you to help them!

  7. #32
    Super Member urgodschild2's Avatar
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    Well I would like to kno wif the Ikea in Australia would be selling that as I would consider buying it for my granddaughter to learn to sew. It is true that one should not look at the plastic and be turned away...it is what is on the inside that really counts. I will like to hear if you like it if you get it.
    Dreaming of New England while being stuck in So. Calif.(the asphalt jungle of the world.) But hey the Happiest Place on Earth is here.

  8. #33
    Super Member meanmom's Avatar
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    Jacquie, I have no idea of the quality of the machine. I didn't even know that Ikea sold them. According to their website my local store has about 6 of them in stock. If you would like I could get it for you and ship it to you.Just let me know.

    Pat

  9. #34
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    Ikea also sells a compter table that I use as a sewing and ironing table. I bought the units that put together can wrap a corner. Plenty of room for my sewing maching and embroidery machine and ironing. Very inexpensive.

  10. #35
    Super Member icon17's Avatar
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    I can tell you this Don't ever buy a machine with the Presserfoot lift lever under/inside the arm area! I did and its always in the way and your always hitting it! as you turn fabric!!

  11. #36
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    Looks like a kid's machine to me!

  12. #37
    Member Bicycle Hobo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaggieLou View Post
    Why not get the Janome Sew-Mini? It's a better machine for about the same price.
    I looked one over & I did not much like it. I bought the model up from it. It was a better machine & price.

    http://www.hancockfabrics.com/Janome-3128-Sewing-Machine-Standard-Sewing-Machines_stcVVproductId81913199VVcatId539684VVview prod.htm


    Quote Originally Posted by icon17 View Post
    I can tell you this Don't ever buy a machine with the Presserfoot lift lever under/inside the arm area! I did and its always in the way and your always hitting it! as you turn fabric!!
    I had to adjust to this new Presserfoot Position on my latest machines. I could see the logic in their positioning. The lever is far less likely to be damaged as it is hidden within the sewing machine's own protective arm. Rather than just jutting out where anything could happen when it hits something hard and not giving in.

    Quote Originally Posted by matraina View Post
    Looks like a kid's machine to me!
    I am always amazed how limiting people's eye or opinion to offered products to what the product "looks" like. I worry far more about the innards and stitch quality rather than superficial "looks." I think this limiting prejudice spills out over into other parts of ones' own life.
    Last edited by Bicycle Hobo; 05-31-2012 at 04:46 PM.

  13. #38
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    I have several machines and the one I take to classes is a Brother rx 7700 (I think the letters are right-The number is for sure) It is a fantastic light weight machine. It is about $170. from Costco and if you are going to start a young quilter, it has every foot you need for quilting (including the walking foot), applique, and general sewing and makes a button hole the size your button is with a special foot. It isn't as cheap as the Ikea but a great inexpensive machine.
    Robin
    Robin

  14. #39
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    Jacquie, I'd like to make a couple of comments to you. I teach sewing and quilting, both, and as of today, knitting, in my home. Back in 2008 we had a 7 yr old great granddaughter living with us for a year. We bought her a Janome Sew Mini for Christmas, and after one apron, it sounded like a train roaring through. I was not impressed with it at all. I have a vintage New Home, and a Brother CS600i which I let me students use. (I keep my Pfaff 7570 for myself). I am very impressed with the Brother. When I talked to a local quilt shop's sewing machine mechanic, I discussed machines with him. His comments were, to stay away from all new Singers. His best recommendations were Brother and Baby Lock. He said they are the best being built now, and have the least amount of problems. For your info, I got both of my student machines on line from Ken's Sewing in Muscle Shoals, AL. I have been very pleased with his service. My Brother was a Refurbished machine, and I got it for $125, instead of the usual $175 or $200. These are just some thoughts that might help you. I, too, love teaching kids to sew, but I would get them a fairly good machine that won't break down in a few weeks, like our Janome Sew Mini did.

  15. #40
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    Thank you for being such a good neighbor. I tend to agree with the others who think a "real" machine would be better. I bought a toy one for my DGD when she was about 5 and it almost drove me mad! I finally threw that thing out the door and bought a Brother for something like $89. She's still using it and she's 15.

  16. #41
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    I have a Janome Sew Mini Sewing Machine that I use a back up and when I travel. I love it. Yes, it certainly let's you know it's working (a little loud) but I kind of like it. It's a little workhorse and I was able to get it on sale for $49 at Hancocks (usually $79). If you have any serious doubts about the one from IKEA, I recommend this one instead.

  17. #42
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    When teaching two 10 yr olds to sew (niece and great niece), had two older mechanical Kenmores that still sewed beautifully. They had to learn how to care for the machine as well as sew on them. My niece is now 12 and has had her machine at home for a few years. It is amazing what she has done on her own, having a real machine to use.

    When she comes to me she gets to use my new Pfaff because she is so good. She also gets to see what a "better" machine is like.

    The other Kenmore is still sitting here, waiting for the next little one,

    Moral of the story: don,t spend a lot of money but give themsomething real.

  18. #43
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok View Post
    anyone lucky enough to get one yet? what is it like? how does it sew? is it noisy?

    http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/60208974/

    I heard it has an oscillating hook?
    The plastic wonder is cute, but doubt very much that I would buy one. I prefer to teach kids to sew with a good quality vintage/antique sewing machine. The new plastic machines can be frustrating when they won't sew properly; if a child gets frustrated they just decide that its not worth the hassle.
    A Singer 99 with a hand crank would be a much better machine and it'll last forever. I taught 2 little girls 6 & 8 to sew with my 99 and 201 hand crank machines, they liked how they were in complete control of the machine. They made doll quilts from my scrap bag.
    Sharon
    Last edited by purplefiend; 06-02-2012 at 11:30 AM.

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