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Thread: the IKEA machine

  1. #1
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    the IKEA machine

    anyone lucky enough to get one yet? what is it like? how does it sew? is it noisy?

    http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/60208974/

    I heard it has an oscillating hook?

  2. #2
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    It looks like a child's machine to me. This is the first time I've seen it.

  3. #3
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    it is a child's machine...and it sews so good that the stores can't keep them on the shelves...BUT, they don't offer it online..sigh....I want one for my neighbor girls...their dad is raising them alone since mom turned to drugs 3 years ago....and they want me to teach them to sew...they are 6 &10 this summer!

  4. #4
    Super Member Mitch's mom's Avatar
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    It also looks like a Singer brand machine by the shape of the casing.

  5. #5
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    If it's made as well as their furniture and other accessories it should last a few months:< I was just there with a friend and didn't see this for sale. Honestly, I don't know why you'd want to give that to a child? IMO it looks like a cheap piece of plastic.

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    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    To be honest, I would look for a Singer 99k.. It's not as cute, but it will continue to work for them.. Forever...

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    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok View Post
    I heard it has an oscillating hook?
    What is an oscillating hook?

  8. #8
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    I would look for vintage machines for your neighbor girls. I just don't trust the itty bitty plastic ones. If you really want to get one of the itty-bitty machines--I would check out the little Janome that Hancock Fabrics sells or even one of the cheap Brother's that Walmart sells. That way, if you keep the receipt and have a problem--you can take it back. I've thought about the little Brother at Walmart that has the extension table to take on vacation instead of lugging my trusty old Euro-Pro, especially when we fly. I bought a cheap, plastic White mini-machine just for a plane ride vacation and it is extremely loud, vibrates more than my Harley, plastic feed dogs and can't sew a straight line--really--even paper piecing on it was a challenge. Now I am too embarrassed to even give it away! Maybe my non-sewing MIL? No, she'd spend days calling all the aunts, uncles, cousins and neighbors telling them what a piece of crap I gave her and she's never sewed a day in her life. I doubt she has even sewed a button on.
    Beverly

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    I was able to examine this machine at my Ikea store a while back. IMHO I would say to steer clear of it. For $60 it just does not look like it would last through a single project!!

  10. #10
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    I am considering to buy one when it becomes available at my local Ikea ONLY IF it is similar in construction & durable as my other present ones. I use & own 2 of those "plastic" sewing machines. They are both from Janome & retailed for about 100 dollars each. Remember the most important thing about those "plastic" ones. Do not be so "hung up" on the outer plastic casing. That is mostly for decoration and covering the innards. The most important is the innards attached to a metal frame within that plastic outer casing. If they are made up of mostly durable metal with minimal plastic, I buy. Otherwise I pass.

    The oscillating hook is a important hint to it's make up (probably a metal one). I behooves me and adds a bit more incentive to examine & explore the machine a bit further whenever it arrives at my local Ikea.
    Last edited by Bicycle Hobo; 05-29-2012 at 06:44 PM.

  11. #11
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace View Post
    If it's made as well as their furniture and other accessories it should last a few months:< I was just there with a friend and didn't see this for sale. Honestly, I don't know why you'd want to give that to a child? IMO it looks like a cheap piece of plastic.
    I agree ... Ikea has IMO lost quality a great deal in recent years. About 10 years ago we purchased our bed and wardrobe there and love them. We went there a month or so ago to look at book shelves for the family room and could not believe how much the quality has degraded. I honestly don't think I'd trust Ikea with electronics, they can't even make a decent book shelf - how hard is that?
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

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    I second the idea to go to eBay and check out vintage machines. You can share history of sewing and what was going on in the world at the time the machines were made as well as sharing your love of sewing. These older machines are easily maintained or repaired as DH and I are learning.
    Cheryl Robinson
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  13. #13
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DogHouseMom View Post
    I agree ... Ikea has IMO lost quality a great deal in recent years. About 10 years ago we purchased our bed and wardrobe there and love them. We went there a month or so ago to look at book shelves for the family room and could not believe how much the quality has degraded. I honestly don't think I'd trust Ikea with electronics, they can't even make a decent book shelf - how hard is that?

    LOL!! I love IKEA for the design aspect and ingenuity behind their product, but the actual product is well, disposable, usually. Everything is pretty inexpensive and particle board, and doesn't hold up to any sort of long term use. My son's drawers literally fell apart within a few days and became a safety hazard. What did he do other than open and close a drawer or two every day....nothing. So the $200ish dresser lasted about 5 years give or take a year. There are things I just won't buy there. Anything that will get day to day abuse will NOT last. Shelving etc. that really is decorative or pieces that aren't used every day are better bets. I love IKEA but I'm also very aware of its deficiencies! I buy sheets, towels, decorative pieces-things like that. Beds, couches, flooring, kitchen cabinets, I stay clear of. I have an IKEA bed in my guest room that gets used maybe 6 nights a year and its surface is all chipped and looking yucky. It's probably 8 years old. So, that's maybe 48-58 nights of useage? I don't think my guests were that active in it, but I'd have to ask to double-check!

  14. #14
    Senior Member stillclock's Avatar
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    if i provide good materials for my daughter's projects, i am teaching her that her work has value. i am also teaching her that the materials she uses have intrinsic value and should be respected.

    she's 7 and has been watching me sew her whole life. i just bought her a janome 372 machine on kijiji (canadian craig's list) for $100. it's pretty much the same machine that has served me loyally for almost 20 years. she's sewing on paper right now, figuring out how the pedal works.

    she'll learn step by step how to take care of the machine and to sew, just like i did. and hopefully she will grow to love it.

    the children's machines all look like crap to me. there's no reason a child can't use a regular machine, and learn to care for and respect it. for kids without a mom, a good machine bought by a loving neighbour might be the only machine they get for a good long time. for an extra $40, if you can afford it, is a huge difference in quality.

    aileen

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    Super Member Pat625's Avatar
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    I think it is wonderful that you want to pass the art on to others!! I would look at the machine when you get a chance and see how the construction works..I have a machine that I have been using for years that has a plastic body and I paid only $99 for...It is all I have and it works great...I say don't judge the machine by the cover..look a little deeper!!

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    Super Member AshleyR's Avatar
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    Jacquie, I know this isn't what you asked, but last night, during my cruising the information superhighway, I found this: http://www.overstock.com/Crafts-Sewing/Brother-LS2300PRW-Limited-Edition-Project-Runway-Sewing-Machine-Refurbished/6475242/product.html?cid=202290&kid=9553000357392&track=pspla&adtype=pla&kw={keyword}

    I don't even know what Ikea is, so I can't help you with your original question! But I thought this was a sweet deal and am considering buying one for myself as a back up and it might be a good machine for the girls. Good for you to teach them!

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    I'm with everyone else--Much better off to get a vintage real machine at a yard sale or on ebay for the girls to learn on. It's what my DGD's will be learning on someday. You can pick one up usually for around $25.00, sometimes less, sometimes free!

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    You must go to Ikea.com and just check out this store!! I have an Ikea 45 minutes away here on Long Island, and shop there as often as my purse will allow. They have an interesting variety of fabrics. I recently purchased 15 yards of my favorite print and completely re-decorated my lower level family room which includes an 'L' which I use for my sewing studio. As for Ikea's furniture, three weeks ago I replaced my 25 year old Ikea twin floor-to-ceiling wardrobes for two high dressers from their Hemnes series. These new, very large dressers are well constructed, easily assembled and cost only $249 each (on sale). I also purchased the matching nightstands. We still use our 22 year old Ikea wicker head/foot board queen sized bed. It's holding up extremely well for its age. I must also note that both my daughters (now 28 and 22) have taken their own Ikea bedroom furniture with them as they left the nest. Those furniture pieces are at least 15 years old and still look as good as the day I brought them home. Of course, my girls take good care of their belongings and did not 'rough house'. If you do not have an Ikea nearby, I could not suggest you purchase online and have your items shipped as their shipping charges are astronomical!!! Better to visit the store and enjoy the experience. I hope you get to do that someday soon. I know you will not be disappointed!!QUOTE=AshleyR;5252873]Jacquie, I know this isn't what you asked, but last night, during my cruising the information superhighway, I found this: http://www.overstock.com/Crafts-Sewing/Brother-LS2300PRW-Limited-Edition-Project-Runway-Sewing-Machine-Refurbished/6475242/product.html?cid=202290&kid=9553000357392&track=pspla&adtype=pla&kw={keyword}

    I don't even know what Ikea is, so I can't help you with your original question! But I thought this was a sweet deal and am considering buying one for myself as a back up and it might be a good machine for the girls. Good for you to teach them![/QUOTE]

  19. #19
    Super Member Nanamoms's Avatar
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    Well, I can say it is adorable! I've never bought anything from Ikea because we don't have one in our area. If you have one nearby, you can always get it and test it out before letting the girls sew on it. I also am teaching my 5yo DGD to sew...we're just beginning...and I picked up one of the children's machines ($10) for her to "play with". It was a chain stitch only and she got very frustrated with it. "I" was frustrated with it!! I ended up letting her sit in my lap with me guiding her hands and me using the foot pedal on my 15-91 and she couldn't get enough of sewing small strips together!! I think that made all the difference in the world to her. Every time she comes, she asks to sew!!

  20. #20
    Super Member AshleyR's Avatar
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    I will also add that I was given a vintage machine when I was younger, and it was a nightmare! I wasn't taught how to use it, though, and I am sure that would have made a big difference. I learned to sew in Home Ec classes and so I knew the basics, but that machine was very mean to me! I stopped sewing for a very long time because I was intimidated by the old machine. I got a cheapie one from Walmart when I started again and I'm glad that I did b/c it didn't scare me!

  21. #21
    Super Member wolph33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace View Post
    If it's made as well as their furniture and other accessories it should last a few months:< I was just there with a friend and didn't see this for sale. Honestly, I don't know why you'd want to give that to a child? IMO it looks like a cheap piece of plastic.
    I agree-I would not teach a child to sew on anything I would not use myself.If it is not a great machine without issues they will hate sewing not love it.My grand kids learned to sew on my Designer SE and they love sewing.
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/Upnorthcrafter

  22. #22
    Super Member LynnVT's Avatar
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    If you read the description, this Ikea has an aluminum frame.
    "The business of life is making memories. In the end, it is all we have." Butler Charlie Carson, Downton Abbey, season 4, episode 3, PBS.

  23. #23
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    Very interesting! I did not know Ikea had a machine. It sure is cute!

  24. #24
    Super Member Sandra-P's Avatar
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    Jacquie, How sweet of you to take on the task of teaching your neighbor girls how to sew. That is something they will always remember. I dont know about the machine but, if you have a store nearby maybe you could look at it in person. -Sandra
    Sandra

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    At least it has bobbins and will make a regular stitch, not just a chain stitch. I would be leary, but would probably try it out at the store. I love my Pfaffs, but none are at that price point.

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