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Instead of binding--turning in the raw edges?

Instead of binding--turning in the raw edges?

Old 01-14-2018, 06:16 AM
  #21  
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I tried this method, Once, didn't like it and redid it with a traditional binding, I don't mind doing the binding, to me, it means the quilt is almost done.

Last edited by QuiltnNan; 09-29-2018 at 05:36 PM. Reason: shouting/all caps
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Old 01-14-2018, 06:26 AM
  #22  
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I think it looks great, however, I think the edges would fray more quickly than if you had binding. What do †hink?
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Old 01-14-2018, 07:48 AM
  #23  
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Had never heard of finishing the edges of a quilt this way. I love to do the binding on quilts though.
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Old 01-14-2018, 08:42 AM
  #24  
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This was a very common way to finish a quilt. My first three quilts had this edge. It's not that easy for me to keep it straight on a large quilt. I still use it on small quilts and projects.
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Old 01-14-2018, 09:05 AM
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would this be like finishing a birthing hole?
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Old 01-14-2018, 09:25 AM
  #26  
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One more question, a quick Google search seems to suggest that some find this way of finishing to be LESS durable. One blog I found (https://www.thespruce.com/sew-knife-...inding-2821319) specifically said to only use this kind of finishing for wallhangings or small quilts. Have you really found this way of finishing to be as durable as traditional binding?[/QUOTE]

In about 1995 I bought an antique, 2-color pieced quilt appraised as from 1860's, the quilt has the knife edge for binding and it is all intact. Actually bought it for $1 at an estate sale but the quilt was in the horse barn. I washed it as any other quilt and it held up great with no issues.
Nice to know a bit of history on the method. It does make sense if the maker did not have extra fabric for binding.
Thank you for bringing up the topic.
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Old 01-14-2018, 09:36 AM
  #27  
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I often make my backing much larger than my top and trim back when finished hand quilting. Depending on what size I want my binding I fold in half to the edge of the top then over the top to where ever I want it and stitch down . You can stitch in the ditch, decorative stitch or hand stitch. i hope this makes sense, easier to do than explain.
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Old 01-14-2018, 09:57 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by onemoe View Post
would this be like finishing a birthing hole?
Sure sounds the same to me. I have birthed quilts many times. It's fast, secure too. And is done by machine rather than hand stitching. I allow about 1/4 inch seam along the edges, then turn the quilt right-side-out. (birthing it) After birthing I usually sew another seam around the quilt close to the edge, just to give it a finished look. Great for hangings, table mats, other small items.
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Old 01-14-2018, 03:27 PM
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My mother did this on some often washed utility quilts and they are still good. She passed away over 30 years ago. I've also used it and it works fine.
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Old 01-14-2018, 04:25 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by farmquilter View Post
One more question, a quick Google search seems to suggest that some find this way of finishing to be LESS durable. One blog I found (https://www.thespruce.com/sew-knife-...inding-2821319) specifically said to only use this kind of finishing for wallhangings or small quilts. Have you really found this way of finishing to be as durable as traditional binding?
Wow. I would love to see that quilt! And, good to know that it's still in tact.


In about 1995 I bought an antique, 2-color pieced quilt appraised as from 1860's, the quilt has the knife edge for binding and it is all intact. Actually bought it for $1 at an estate sale but the quilt was in the horse barn. I washed it as any other quilt and it held up great with no issues.
Nice to know a bit of history on the method. It does make sense if the maker did not have extra fabric for binding.
Thank you for bringing up the topic.[/QUOTE]
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