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Thread: Is Insulbrite really necessary??

  1. #1
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Is Insulbrite really necessary??

    Back in the old days, people never used insulbrite when they made potholders. Most of the ones that I have taken apart only had a thick layer of cotton batting. I can't really see where it is necessary in order to make a successful potholder. After all, I usually just grab a dishtowel when I remove something from the oven. And, a lot of times, I set a hot pan on a folded dish towel. I can see where it would be necessary when making the casserole cozies to help hold the heat in. But, is it really necessary when just making a simple potholder? I'm planning on making some for Christmas gifts and for Bingo Prizes at our Senior Center and I want to make sure I make them right. What is your line of thinking on this?
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    Super Member nanna-up-north's Avatar
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    I haven't made any potholders yet but bought some insulbrite just last month to do some. I think I want to use it because the extra protection is nice for hot stuff and often I use a potholder to set a hot pan on the table. It's really not a good idea to just use a dishtowel. I'll be watching to see what others think.
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  3. #3
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    Sometimes I do, sometimes I don't. If you are selling or giving away use at least 2 layers of cotton batting. I have one pattern that when I finish the design it is very thick so with that one I don't (I use those a lot so I know they will work that way). If it will be used on formic or a wood tabletop I would use it to direct the heat up.

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    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
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    I've made lots of potholders and have always used one layer of insulbrite with one layer of 100% cotton. I imagine you could use 2 layers of 100% cotton batting...I just never tried it....I wouldn't want the recipient to get burned or hurt in any way. If I remember correctly, on one cup of coffee, I placed the 'shiny flecked side' to the hot side of the pot holders and the cotton batting to the hand side.

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  5. #5
    Super Member piepatch's Avatar
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    I use insulbrite and warm and natural for my pot holders now, but use to use silence cloth. It is so thick, it only takes one layer. Silence cloth does shrink quite a bit, so would have to be washed before using.

  6. #6
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by piepatch View Post
    I use insulbrite and warm and natural for my pot holders now, but use to use silence cloth. It is so thick, it only takes one layer. Silence cloth does shrink quite a bit, so would have to be washed before using.
    Ok, I had no idea what "Silence Cloth" was so had to google it. Found it at Nancy's Notions. http://www.nancysnotions.com/product...felt+fabric.do
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  7. #7
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    It depends on what the purpose is. For hot pads I just do them with a couple of layers of batt to protect the furniture. If I was doing them to gift, I would use a layer of insulbrite because i wouldn't know how the recipient was going to use them. I don't do oven mitts or pads for myself because I buy commercial, long barbecue mitts for oven use.

  8. #8
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I never buy anything specifically for potholders... It 's amazing what you can use for the insides of potholders. Batting scraps, mattress pads, old towels, old sweatshirts, home dec fabric .. tapestry scraps are particularly nice.

  9. #9
    Super Member piepatch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn View Post
    Ok, I had no idea what "Silence Cloth" was so had to google it. Found it at Nancy's Notions. http://www.nancysnotions.com/product...felt+fabric.do
    Silence Cloth was once used mainly for table pads to protect the table, but is now used for pot holders, bags or any craft (except quilts) needing batting and protection. I noticed when I followed this link, the Silence Cloth is $11.99 a yard, but it is 60" wide, so you could get a lot of milage out of it for pot holders, especially since it only takes one layer. It is pretty thick, so if your sewing machine doesn't feed thick fabric well, you might want to consider using something else. Hancock fabric used to carry it, so if you can get a small piece of it to try, you would know if you like it. Remember it shrinks, so wash before using.

  10. #10
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    I use it in mine. You certainly would not have to just be sure it is thick enough not to get burned.

  11. #11
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn View Post
    Ok, I had no idea what "Silence Cloth" was so had to google it. Found it at Nancy's Notions. http://www.nancysnotions.com/product...felt+fabric.do
    Okay. I had to do the same thing. Never heard of it! I live in a little hick town where we only get what Walmart gets.
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    Super Member mary quilting's Avatar
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    I use 3 layers of warm and natural.

  13. #13
    Super Member Knitette's Avatar
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    I'm with the, 'Better to be safe than sorry' brigade and always use Insul-Bright. People didn't use it in the old days because it wasn't available (they also used to put butter on burns too.......).

    I think the fact that you are using these as prizes at a Senior Centre makes the question irrelevant really - imho.
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  14. #14
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I don't like Insulbrite. I don't like the feel of it and it's messy to cut. I like the heat resistant silver fabric. I put a layer of warm and natural batting with the silver and it works much better to keep the heat away then insulbrite and has less bulk.
    Got fabric?

  15. #15
    Super Member CookyIN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    I don't like Insulbrite. I don't like the feel of it and it's messy to cut. I like the heat resistant silver fabric. I put a layer of warm and natural batting with the silver and it works much better to keep the heat away then insulbrite and has less bulk.
    This looks great to me. I was just thinking about making some potholders and wondering what to put inside. Thanks!

  16. #16
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I made potholders for myself just using W&N batting - can't remember if I used 2 or 3 layers, but I think it was only 2. They work just fine, no heat coming through. The design I used winds up with several layers of fabric in addition to the batting, so that might be a factor. If you're really concerned, make one without Insulbrite and test it out. Chances are it will be just fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn View Post
    Ok, I had no idea what "Silence Cloth" was so had to google it. Found it at Nancy's Notions. http://www.nancysnotions.com/product...felt+fabric.do
    Is this also called BUMP?

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    I was wondering the same thing. I have a pattern for an oven mitt that says you're suppose to sandwich one layer of Insulbrite in between two layers of Warm & Natural. Well, by the time you do all of the layering, the pile of fabric and batting is so thick it hardly fits into the machine. Plus... the pot holder or hot pad... whatever it is you're making is so stiff it's hard to use. So, I'm really confused on this one. I certainly don't want anyone to burn themselves but at the same time, if something is so thick you can't use it, what good is it?

  19. #19
    Super Member mike'sgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn View Post
    Ok, I had no idea what "Silence Cloth" was so had to google it. Found it at Nancy's Notions. http://www.nancysnotions.com/product...felt+fabric.do
    Wow that stuff is pricey!!

  20. #20
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    The last time I made potholders I just used two layers of Request weight Dream Cotton. The main thing is to not quilt them very much. I gave them to a whole bunch of people and nobody has complained yet. I use mine all the time and if something is particularly hot they're soft enough and big enough I can fold them in half.

  21. #21
    Junior Member tyoung's Avatar
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    I have tried them with and without the Insulbrite, and I prefer it with and a layer of warm and natural.

  22. #22
    Senior Member hevemi's Avatar
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    I seldom buy any. I use all kinds of leftover pieces/recycled, and also layer two or more pieces of batting between two cotton or denim pieces.

  23. #23
    Super Member piepatch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike'sgirl View Post
    Wow that stuff is pricey!!
    Yes, mike'sgirl, it is pricey, but it is 60" wide, and you could get 6 cuts across at 10"X 10" each for less than $4.00. Actually, you can probably get it cheaper at Hancock's if they still carry it. The silence cloth is just a suggestion, because it only takes one layer, but warm and natural, insulbrite and some of the other suggestions here work well too. I knew a lady who never used anything but old terry cloth towels for batting to make pot holders, and she wouldn't think of using anything else.

  24. #24
    Super Member Justquilting's Avatar
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    I use 3 layers of W&N. everyone loves them. I do a 9 patch for the top. I use a decorative stitch on all the seams & I use a binding around it. A little more work. But they make great gifts
    Do what you want...Love what you do!!

  25. #25
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    My mom used to use a couple of layers of my dad's old insulated long johns and it worked find as batting in hot pads! Good way to recycle.

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