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Thread: Has anyone made potholders with insulbrite?

  1. #1
    Senior Member DeniseP's Avatar
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    I am making potholders with scrap fabric for Christmas presents this year (so that I can buy more fabric, I'm sure you all understand) and it's the first time I've used insulbrite. Is it better to use two thicknesses for each potholder or is one enough?

  2. #2
    Super Member Sheila Elaine's Avatar
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    I use one layer of insulbrite & one layer of a low loft polyester batting in my potholders. I like it as it doesn't add lots of extra bulk & quilting looks great on them.

  3. #3
    Senior Member DeniseP's Avatar
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    I thought you could not use polyester batting because it would melt.

  4. #4
    Senior Member HeatherQuilts's Avatar
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    Be careful using the polyester on potholders. Polyester can melt and scorch if it gets to hot. I wouldn't want to see anyone get burned! :-)

  5. #5
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    i use warm and natural with the insulbright in my potholders...i like them 'lofty' i guess :)
    i put a layer of insulbrite in between 2 layers of w&n, then quilt them.

  6. #6
    Super Member Deborah12687's Avatar
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    When I make my pot holders I use 2 layers of insulbright and sandwich cotton batting in between. Then I double the fabric on both sides of the pot holder. I am making pot holders to sell and I sure do not want a law suit if some one gets burned.

  7. #7
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    i just started and use a lyer, but i think i might double it up, i do strip piecing onthem

  8. #8
    Super Member GrammaNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheila Elaine
    I use one layer of insulbrite & one layer of a low loft polyester batting in my potholders. I like it as it doesn't add lots of extra bulk & quilting looks great on them.
    Ditto.

  9. #9
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    yes insulbrite and cotton batting!

  10. #10
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    I've noticed that the polyester filled potholders my Mom made are NOT heat resistant if they get wet.

  11. #11
    Super Member burnsk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    I've noticed that the polyester filled potholders my Mom made are NOT heat resistant if they get wet.
    I got a very bad burn on my fingers using a potholder with poly-fill that I didn't know had gotten wet. I was taking a pan out of the oven.

  12. #12
    Super Member wvdek's Avatar
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    Everything I have read says NOT to use poyester batting but double layer of cotton batting along with the Insulbrite. Also read something yesterday that said not to use the Insulbrite in the microwave to heat up potatoes or corn.

  13. #13

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    I use one of insulbrite and one of warm and natural. I remember reading awhile ago that cotton batting was better to use. I have burned one and the cotton and insulbrite worked. I survived.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by deeceem
    I use one of insulbrite and one of warm and natural. I remember reading awhile ago that cotton batting was better to use. I have burned one and the cotton and insulbrite worked. It survived.

  15. #15
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    I used 1 layer of insul-brite and 1 of Hobbs 80/20. Works ok for potholders but I'd use another layer of Hobbs 80/20 for a trivet or oven mitts.

  16. #16
    mosaicthinking's Avatar
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    Just for another point of view I use blanket offcuts made of 100% wool for my potholders. I am able to buy offcuts from a local blanket manufacturer and like wool because it's a naturally good insulator.

  17. #17
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Insulbrite will ruin a rotary cutting blade. I use an old worn out blade or my craft scissors to cut it. I found a piece of heavy duty aluminium foil sewn between cotton batting works just as good and it's much cheaper.

  18. #18
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    Thank you for the information. God bless.

  19. #19
    Super Member GrammaNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo
    Insulbrite will ruin a rotary cutting blade. I use an old worn out blade or my craft scissors to cut it. I found a piece of heavy duty aluminium foil sewn between cotton batting works just as good and it's much cheaper.
    Thanks for the info!

  20. #20
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I always recover my old potholders with orphan blocks. They become very thick and make the best potholders I can hold a hot pan for a long time if need be.

  21. #21
    Super Member Deborah12687's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by burnsk
    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    I've noticed that the polyester filled potholders my Mom made are NOT heat resistant if they get wet.
    I got a very bad burn on my fingers using a potholder with poly-fill that I didn't know had gotten wet. I was taking a pan out of the oven.
    You shouldn't use wet pot holders at all. No matter how thick a potholder is you can get burned as water conducts heat.

  22. #22
    Super Member katsewnsew's Avatar
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    I also noted on the Insulbrite instructions that there is only 1 reflective side, so do you need 2 pieces of Insulbrite with cotton batting???

  23. #23
    Junior Member Heid's Avatar
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    Are you using one layer of each? I've been reading a lot about this, and it sounds like most people have been recommending two layers of each, yet i'm not sure how many thicknesses my sewing machine can go through. I don't want people to get burned on the pot holders, but want the sewing to go easily. Any thoughts would be appreciated. Thank you.
    Quote Originally Posted by craftybear
    yes insulbrite and cotton batting!

  24. #24
    Super Member Mary O's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo
    Insulbrite will ruin a rotary cutting blade. I use an old worn out blade or my craft scissors to cut it. I found a piece of heavy duty aluminium foil sewn between cotton batting works just as good and it's much cheaper.
    Aluminum foil? Can you wash?

  25. #25
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    I used w layers of insulbrite with no batting in both pot holders and mitts. The insulation properties seem fine, the bulk is not very thick which I find a plus to use. The less bulk made the mitt easier to turn when I was making them. I was very pleased with the result. One set of mitts went to my fireman SIL who thought their safety factor was acceptable and he is REALLY picky. For people
    "who have everything" customized hot pads seem to me to be a very good choice. I haven't seen any embroidered hotpads, hotpads with sport team logos, etc or other very personalized items on them.

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