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Thread: Interfacing for T-Shirt quilt

  1. #1
    Super Member Joeysnana's Avatar
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    I want to make a T-shirt quilt from my grandsons' little shirts. I know you have to fuse interfacing onto the backs of the shirts to provide stability and less stretching. Most of the shirts have logos or decals on them. Won't they melt when ironing on the interfacing? Is there another way to make a T-shirt quilt?

  2. #2
    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
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    I have never made one, but you don't hold the iron on the interfacing that long and I don't think it would be any worse then the heat from the dryer.

  3. #3
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
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    Never made one but first thought is - turn the t-shirt face down on ironing board then interfacing sticky side down then use pressing cloth to secure.

  4. #4
    Super Member Joeysnana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltinghere
    Never made one but first thought is - turn the t-shirt face down on ironing board then interfacing sticky side down then use pressing cloth to secure.
    That sounds like it would work. Never thought of using a pressing cloth. thanks!

  5. #5
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Just be sure to use the right kind of interfacing. I like nylon tricot for that sort of thing; just make sure that the stretchiest grainline of the nylon tricot is going along the least stretchy grainline of the t-shirt fabric.

  6. #6
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    Press from the back.

  7. #7
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    I created this link for us about t shirt quilts information

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-50599-1.htm

    Quote Originally Posted by Joeysnana
    I want to make a T-shirt quilt from my grandsons' little shirts. I know you have to fuse interfacing onto the backs of the shirts to provide stability and less stretching. Most of the shirts have logos or decals on them. Won't they melt when ironing on the interfacing? Is there another way to make a T-shirt quilt?

  8. #8
    Super Member Joeysnana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by craftybear
    I created this link for us about t shirt quilts information

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-50599-1.htm

    Quote Originally Posted by Joeysnana
    I want to make a T-shirt quilt from my grandsons' little shirts. I know you have to fuse interfacing onto the backs of the shirts to provide stability and less stretching. Most of the shirts have logos or decals on them. Won't they melt when ironing on the interfacing? Is there another way to make a T-shirt quilt?
    Thanks so much. I bookmarked it for future reference!

  9. #9
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    has any one ever left the arms on some of the shirts if so how was it done

  10. #10
    Power Poster Mariposa's Avatar
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    For interfacing on t-shirt quilts, I use a non-woven one. It keeps the shirt pieces from stretching while sewing. I use a light or medium weight one, and they are great!

  11. #11
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    you cut out your logos into the size blocks you want to use, purchase lightweight woven fusable interfacing (not paperbacked fusable) place your 'blocks' face down on a press cloth (i just use a piece of muslin) it does not take a really hot iron to attach the interfacing, just follow the instructions that comes with the interfacing. and you press...don't iron...as in pick the iron up and place it...do not slide it across the blocks. i have made i think 8 t-shirt quilts, have never had a problem melting the logos, just turn down the heat a little bit and always use a pressing cloth.

  12. #12
    Super Member mpeters1200's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by craftybear
    I created this link for us about t shirt quilts information

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-50599-1.htm
    Craftybear you ROCK!!! I had just started a thread this morning asking questions about what would be best for t-shirt quilts.

    I have to say I have gotten more links and resources from your hard work and effort than any other member on this board. I don't know how many hours are in your day....I don't know if you eat or sleep or run errands .... or other normal functions in your day. You just have no idea how much I appreciate your knowledge and resources!

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