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Thread: Ironing boards

  1. #1
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    Ironing boards

    I know we all have ironing boards but does anyone have one that they love. I need a new one. I was ironing lots of dress shirts so there was lots of steam. When I was done, I folded it up to put it away and didn't realize the amount of water on it. It was so rusted it left a huge line of rust spots on the rug where I walked to the closet to put it away.
    I was able to get all the rust off the carpet but there is no hope for the ironing board. It's in the garage....
    I was looking at different web sites trying to find a new one but there are so many and the price ranges are crazy. I need a wider one, so the ones that are $9.99 at Walmart are a NO. I iron all my husbands dress clothes and also do lots of quilting, no steam, so I need a multi purpose board. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.

    Jan

  2. #2
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    Check out the Reliable brand ironing boards. They are quality. Walmart has the 100IB online. I have this one: It is without a doubt the best one for home ironing and it was sitting in my FIL's basement never used.
    Reliable The Board 500VB Home Vacuum and Up-Air Pressing Table

    Look at this one: It is made for ironing shirts. Parker Extra Wide Ironing Pro Board with Shoulder Wing Folding

    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
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  3. #3
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    I'll be following this thread as well since my board has developed a very annoying squeak. However, I don't think the reviews are good enough on the ones already mentioned to spend the money. Thanks Onebyone for finding the alternatives though.

  4. #4
    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
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    Am I the only one who doesn't like the ones with a tray on the end and a shelf underneath? Wish I still had my grandma's ironing board which I got rid of for some unknown reason. Probably because it was big and I couldn't find a cover. That was before my quilting days.

  5. #5
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    After several new ironing boards that either rocked, squeaked, or just would not stay up, I gave up on a new one, and bought one from a second hand store. I got an older expensive one for less than a cheap one, made my own cover and two layers of cotton batting, because it has an unusual shaped squared off end. We will be working together for many years. I have benn using it for over nine years and no issues.
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

  6. #6
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    The vintage boards are small. I have my great grandmother's wooden ironing board. My grandmother said it belonged to her grandmother as much as she remembered. Steam irons weren't used on wooden boards, in fact all she had on it was a double layer of denim fabric, no batting. My mother had a great heavy metal board she got with Green Stamps. I wish I had it now. She always got a new cover with Green Stamps every few years.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  7. #7
    Super Member rryder's Avatar
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    Green Stamps! Got my very first pair of roller skates with green stamps! Ironing boards-- couldn't find one that I liked that didn't cost a fortune, so made one from a wooden board, some cotton batting and that silver ironing board fabric. I lay it on the end of my cutting table when I want to iron yardage, iron a quilt top and backing before basting or baste a quilt using fusible batting.

    Rob
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  8. #8
    Senior Member AVFD215's Avatar
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    I saw one that is just a regular shape ironing board, but wider and I think longer. Can't remember where though.
    I made one also from a 2ft x 4ft piece of plywood. Now I have to figure out how to mount in the old ironing board that I do not like.

  9. #9
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    The vintage boards are small. I have my great grandmother's wooden ironing board. My grandmother said it belonged to her grandmother as much as she remembered. Steam irons weren't used on wooden boards, in fact all she had on it was a double layer of denim fabric, no batting. My mother had a great heavy metal board she got with Green Stamps. I wish I had it now. She always got a new cover with Green Stamps every few years.
    I had one of those little wooden ironing boards. I got it when I was young a lived in a tiny apartment. It was the perfect size for the apt. After I got married, I got rid of that one because my husband had a nice older metal one (for some unknown reason since he never ironed anything but I still use that board. It really is nice and sturdy.
    Patrice S

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  10. #10
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    Did you already discard your old board? I got one for $5 and then had a big board made to place on top of it. At that time I found a youtube on making one..... mine is heavy because we used what we had on hand. That said.... I rarely use steam.

  11. #11
    Power Poster twinkie's Avatar
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    Just thought I would throw this one in the mix. It is not for ironing shirts or quilt tops or any large items but I love to take it to my quilt guild for use on pressing seams open when piecing. My DH made it for me and everyone loved it so we made several. He did the wood work and I did the material work.

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    Has a handle to carry it and a metal rack to put your miniature iron on. I would put my iron on the rack then wrap the iron cord around the rack and the iron. That fastened it to the rack so I didn't have to worry about carrying the iron separate from the board.

  12. #12
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    I love the one we got from Target many years ago. I sure hope it's the same quality. What I love is that it adjusts to any height (I've even sat on the sofa to iron a bunch of stuff), it doesn't wobble, it has a cradle for the iron, and a shelf beneath (which I use sometimes, not often).

    Can't get the link to work, but check out the Heavy Duty-Threshold brand, $39.99 the Target website.

  13. #13
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    here's a project for your old board if you can spray paint the rust away https://www.pinterest.com/pin/430727151840621503/
    Nancy in western NY
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  14. #14
    Power Poster ube quilting's Avatar
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    I bought an old wooden ironing board for $12.00 at a second hand shop. It is sturdy and larger than the selection of cheap metal ones we have today. I use it for pressing cloths mostly but sometimes I will do fat quarters and other small yardage on it.
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

  15. #15
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    I've bought several for my quilt guild from Bed, Bath & Beyond--can't remember the brand (Reliable??) but they have 3 models and I bought the middle priced ones. They are very nice and work well, plus we are able to put our 2 wide board toppers on them without problems.

  16. #16
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    Twinkle, that sure is a cute board. Great teamwork between you and DH.

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    I have a vintage Mary Proctor ironing board. We found it in the first house we bought when we married in 1995. It's not pretty, but boy is it sturdy. A friend and I found another, in beautiful condition at a thrift store for $5. I've also seen them on eBay, going for $125-150.

  18. #18
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    [QUOTE=rryder;7831725]Green Stamps! Got my very first pair of roller skates with green stamps! Ironing boards-- couldn't find one that I liked that didn't cost a fortune, so made one from a wooden board, some cotton batting and that silver ironing board fabric. I lay it on the end of my cutting table when I want to iron yardage, iron a quilt top and backing before basting or baste a quilt using fusible batting.

    I've heard a lot of quilters who've done that. I'd like to, but no energy, so I suffer with the one I have. It makes so much sense. They however attach it to the top of their boards to make them longer or wider. There are a few u tube videos on this conversion. My motivation is renewed. Lol.

  19. #19
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    That is super cute.

  20. #20
    Super Member Battle Axe's Avatar
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Size:  359.6 KBI got this idea off this board at least 6 years ago. This is a changing table that has been repurposed to an ironing board with storage. I think it made more sense when you don't have an Oliso iron and you can put it up on that taller part. But being the age that I am, lifting heavy stuff is a thing of the past. I took the top off, (made a shelf out of that) and replaced it with an out door plywood covered with batting and then the silver grey quilting insulating fabric. The drawers are just more STASH.

  21. #21
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    I made a table topper without binding. I sewed it RST and turned it right side out. Now I needed to get those seams pressed right. What a pain! I made myself an ironing board that I could put inside it through the opening in the seam. It was a 3" X 6" piece of Masonite that I just happened to have in my laundry room "maybe I'll need this some day" pile. I covered that with a layer of batt and then a cover of muslin. This was sewn on two sides, the board tucked inside and than sewn on the third side as close as I could. The end is left open.

    I tucked that ironing board inside and pressed those seams with my miniature iron. Worked beautifully.
    Last edited by maviskw; 05-27-2017 at 04:58 AM.
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  22. #22
    Junior Member sheilar's Avatar
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    I have a big board that my husband made for me, 22"x55", that fits on top of an old dresser. I then use a tabletop ironing board on top of that for clothing.
    A bed without a quilt is like a sky without stars.

  23. #23
    Super Member sash's Avatar
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    I have been married 54 years and still using the same ironing board I got in my bridal shower. lol. Yes, it did get very rusty, but, I took it out on the patio and got some spray paint and repainted it. No, I do not remember the brand of paint, sorry. Works for me anyway. I did buy me a new one at Walmart, and yes, it is too narrow so don't even use it.
    Me and friend made us a wide board out of plywood and covered it and I just lay it on top of my ironing board when I need a much wider one. Even made my own ironing board covers.

  24. #24
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    I found 2 Proctor ironing boards - at separate times- at garage sales. Since I am a snow bird I keep one in my home in AZ and brought the other to my summer home in Utah. Paid about $5.00 for each of them. So sturdy. One even has a spring-loaded holder for the iron cord as well as an electrical outlet for the iron to plug in. Have covered one in canvas -- great cover and heavy duty. Have yet to make a cover for the second one. Look at thrift shops; you may find one of these larger and sturdier ironing boards.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltnNan View Post
    here's a project for your old board if you can spray paint the rust away https://www.pinterest.com/pin/430727151840621503/
    That is so cute! I am going to have to watch for one like that at the thrift stores.

    I am still using my mother's ironing board. She had it when I was a small child and I inherited it when she got a new one. She confessed to me years later that she wished she had kept it and given me the new one. I offered to change with her but she said she solved the problem by just not ironing anymore! Got to love her solution!! The board is probably over 60 years old now.

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