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Thread: "Machine Quilting in Sections" by Marti Michell- Has Anyone Tried This?

  1. #1
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    "Machine Quilting in Sections" by Marti Michell- Has Anyone Tried This?

    I am new to quilting and have been worried that it may prove too difficult for me to quilt a bed sized quilt on my home sewing machine. I have no problem attaching turned edge applique pieces with my machine. My concern is in "dragging" so much material around while trying to make attractive stitch shapes that are not pulled out of shape by the resistance from the "mass". This would apply to both feed dog up and down quilting.

    I found the above book on quilting individual blocks, or groups of blocks, First and then joining the quilted sections together. Has anyone tried this or a similar technique? Since I am doing different sized applique blocks, I don't think the "Quilt as You Go" method would work for me. I imagine like anything else, there are probably different challenges that would crop up quilting in sections.

    Any experience or observations would be greatly appreciated!
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 03-15-2019 at 09:57 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps

  2. #2
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    All your blocks don't have to be the same size. You can quilt each
    section separately then put them together. Here's an example.
    Hope this helps.
    https://www.sewwhatyvette.com/quilt-...n-them-easily/

  3. #3
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPeezy View Post
    All your blocks don't have to be the same size. You can quilt each
    section separately then put them together. Here's an example.
    Hope this helps.
    https://www.sewwhatyvette.com/quilt-...n-them-easily/
    thanks for this link
    Nancy in western NY
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  4. #4
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I bought the Marti Michell book when I was a new quilter, and I heartily recommend it. I used several of her methods for my large quilts before I eventually bought a longarm. She also has a class on Craftsy/BluPrint. The book takes you beyond the "quilt as you go" technique. She explains several different techniques and shows how to figure out which technique to use on your quilt.

  5. #5
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    I made a king size quilt for my bed about a year ago and used this method to quilt it. I did all the FMQ on my 25 year old Bernina with the tiny throat section. While it was still a bit of a challenge, I was able to get it all quilted by this method on a machine with a small throat area. I thought mine came out really nicely and would recommend her book and method.
    Patrice S

    Bernina Artista 180, Singer 301a, Featherweight Centennial, Rocketeer, Juki 2200 QVP Mini, White 1964 Featherweight

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    I have not done Marti Michell's method, but I have a book, Divide and Conquer! Quilt it Your Way that I used for a quilt that was too large for me to handle. On that one, you make the whole top, then you sandwich it. Then, you cut 1/3 of the batting off on each side. You quilt the center, then add the batting on one side and quilt it and then the other. The advantage is that you don't have all that bulk to deal with at one time.

    They tell you to cut the batting in a wavy line, so that you can line it up. I had no luck with that and wished I had just cut it straight. The iron on fusing that I used to join the sections of batting didn't work well. I used batting with a scrim and it didn't like the iron, so I ended up zig-zaging the batting sections together. Had I planned on using the zagzag to join the sections, it would have been ok, not great, but ok. Once the quilt was done, you couldn't tell any difference. It was just frustrating.

    I think there are patterns that lend themselves to the "quilting in sections" idea better than others. One is the French Braid. With sashing, it would be easy to do. I would suggest you pick a pattern that is actually designed for quilt as you go.

    Mine worked out, but I haven't done it again.

    bkay

  7. #7
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    Haven't seen the book, but I purchased the Craftsy (now Bluprint) class of Marti's, called "Machine Quilting in Sections: Strategies for Any Quilt". It is wonderful and covers several different techniques. I learned a lot from her and refer back to it fairly often.

    I have a sit down longarm now, so don't have to QAYG anymore, but I still do sometimes, to use up smaller pieces of batting. I can tell you the "dragging" is just something you have to work out. Even with a sit down longarm, you have to "puddle" your quilt and free up enough of it around the needle to work one area without dragging. When you feel any resistance again, stop and free up more of the quilt around the needle. Puddle it up so there won't be any drag on the one area you are working on, then move on to the next. It's easy once you get used to doing it.

    If you QAYG, you shouldn't have much 'drag' to deal with at all. The smaller the piece you are quilting, the less 'drag' is a problem.

    If you have access to Marti's book, definitely read it and try her methods. If you learn better by being "shown" a technique, get her class on Bluprint. It's great.
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  8. #8
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I have her book and have used it once. Around the 1st of this year I made a Grandson and his wife a king sized quilt. I made the top in one piece, ripped out seams, marked them and made four smaller quilts. Sewed them back together and hand stitched the back then FMQed down and across to match quilting on the top.

    I told them they got the first and last king quilt I will ever make. I have no empty space in my house to spread it out I was 108 x 117". I did not choose a good patter nor main fabric for it. My bad.
    Another Phyllis
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  9. #9
    Junior Member CurliQ's Avatar
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    I've tried many methods of QAYG. I like 2 methods.

    Join the entire quilt face.
    Have the backing material.
    Cut batting to the small area you want to quilt.
    Roll up all the excess top and backing and quilt your area.
    Unroll, decide on your next area, add batting, roll up all quilted and unquilted areas and quilt your area.

    That's the basic idea, but look at videos to see how it works and if you want to incorporate different things like batting tape.

    I also like making each block.
    Put batting on each block and quilt independently.
    Join blocks.
    Add backing and join backing to quilt. This can be done with very rudimentary patterns just to join the sections, your quilting is already done.

    Again, look it up, YouTube it. There's so many techniques, you just have to find those that speak to you
    ~Sharon

  10. #10
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    I have used both Marti Michell's book and the "Divide and Conquer" book - love them both. I have a pretty good throat space on my Elna but still find it too small sometimes to maneuver. I don't do a lot of free motion quilting - find it too stressful - so I use my walking foot most of the time. I highly recommend Leah Day's Walking Foot Quilting book, too.

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    Betty Cotton has a book: "Cotton Theory" The process is patented. All blocks are sandwiched with batt and back and sewn with a one inch seam on the Right side. Then the seam allowances are folded and held down with a decorative stitch. Makes a beautiful quilt. I made one at least ten years ago. This is a life saver for those who can no longer handle a full sized quilt on the domestic machine. And for those who don't want to, too.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 03-16-2019 at 10:36 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps
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  12. #12
    Super Member Dodie's Avatar
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    I have quilted many large quilts in sections was time consuming but I always enjoyed it but can no longer do it as my shoulders will not handle the weight. If I appliqued I used the applique stitch for part of the quilting and either cross hatched or stippled around the design. I won many ribbons and was entered in some pretty big shows including Paducah I had 2 that were published in magazines and one in the Quilt Art Engagement calendar so it can be done just practice and I took many classes and put my own technique together with using some from different classes don't be afraid dive in start something small and practice

  13. #13
    Senior Member Sailorwoman's Avatar
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    I bought Marti Michell"s book and I used the "Low Fat" quilting method that she described. I was really happy with it and once the quilting was finished, you could not tell that it was done differently from any other quilt. This is the quilt I used that method on. I also like the fact that the book includes different ways of handling quilts. I think it is worth buying. Name:  IMG_1791.jpg
Views: 551
Size:  1.01 MB

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    Sailorwoman, I know you have posted your photo previously but it is one of the most beautiful quilts I have seen!!

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    Wow, that's a gorgeous quilt! If you can quilt this in sections, I don't see why it wouldn't work for any sized quilt a person could need to do. Thanks!

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    Senior Member ladyinpurple135's Avatar
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    I’m chuckling at the moment because I was really interested I. Marti’s book and was going to buy it, but just found it in my great pile of books!! I’m going to read it again as it’s been awhile since I read it last. Thanks so much for the reminder - I do have other books in quilting separate blocks, etc. so I’m hoping I’ll pick up a few tips to try as I have many of Madti’s templates and really like them.

  17. #17
    Senior Member ladyinpurple135's Avatar
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    Sailor woman - I love your log cabin quilt and can’t believe it was done in sections. It makes me very hopeful that I might be able to do this, too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sailorwoman View Post
    I bought Marti Michell"s book and I used the "Low Fat" quilting method that she described. I was really happy with it and once the quilting was finished, you could not tell that it was done differently from any other quilt. This is the quilt I used that method on. I also like the fact that the book includes different ways of handling quilts. I think it is worth buying. Name:  IMG_1791.jpg
Views: 551
Size:  1.01 MB
    Wow...beautiful!!! Can I ask what the back looks like? Also the method you mentioned, “Low Fat”, can this be found on her Bluprint class or was it only in one of her books...if only her book, which one?
    Thank You for sharing...
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 03-17-2019 at 08:33 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps

  19. #19
    Super Member tuckyquilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LadyAg View Post
    I am new to quilting and have been worried that it may prove too difficult for me to quilt a bed sized quilt on my home sewing machine. I have no problem attaching turned edge applique pieces with my machine. My concern is in "dragging" so much material around while trying to make attractive stitch shapes that are not pulled out of shape by the resistance from the "mass". This would apply to both feed dog up and down quilting.

    I found the above book on quilting individual blocks, or groups of blocks, First and then joining the quilted sections together. Has anyone tried this or a similar technique? Since I am doing different sized applique blocks, I don't think the "Quilt as You Go" method would work for me. I imagine like anything else, there are probably different challenges that would crop up quilting in sections.

    Any experience or observations would be greatly appreciated!
    I have used Candy Glendenings Quilt by Column. Which I love. I can quilt Any size quilt, and only have to worry about 12"-15" at a time. I have altered the method, in that I now just make the entire backing in one piece and roll it to my right. I also leave 1/2" on the right edge of the quilting which makes it easier to sew the next column on. I have tried a variety of methods, over the years, and Candy make great sense.. no little strips etc. I can make a quilt with or without sashing.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_b9WjeP0mU
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 03-17-2019 at 01:03 PM. Reason: shouting/all caps
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