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Thread: Machine Quilting

  1. #26
    Super Member Midwestmary's Avatar
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    At a recent FMQ class at my LQS, we machine quilted the middle section of our quilt minus the borders. The borders were then attached and quilted. I thought this was a great method to reduce bulk when quilting a large quilt.

  2. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    Quote Originally Posted by CompulsiveQuilter
    I'm determined to FMQ my first -on my domestic machine. I have an awesome, large template and the Ultimate Pounce (disappears with a steam iron). The template is a glorified meander. ------ but some say start in the middle and some say otherwise. What's the best way? And is an all-over quilting pattern easier/better than stopping and doing something different on the borders? 4" border - what pattern would you use there?
    When hand quilting in a hoop, one always starts in the middle so any excess fabric moves to the sides instead of getting "trapped" in the middle.

    When machine quilting, it's extra work to bury threads if you start and stop in the middle. It's enough if you start at one edge and work toward another edge. That way, if you run out of bobbin thread, you have only one thread per bobbin to bury. Starting in a corner sounds good. You could also start at the middle of an edge and work toward the other edge. The biggest thing to avoid is quilting the border first; you could have extra material trapped in the center that will not "quilt out".
    The truth is that if you have prepared your sandwich well, by heavily stabilizing it with thread, pins or whatever you choose - you can quilt it beginning anywhere because it won't move/shift. However - if you don't, then you are at risk for everything from pleats to running out of backing if you've pushed your top too far over.

    I did quilt with my Singer, until I got a longarm. All quilting, regardless of the machine used, needs to be stabilized in some manner. There are just so many things this process helps to avoid (waving borders, pleats, D-Cups, tucks, shifting blocks, wonkiness, etc.). So, stabilize it well, and you can begin and end anywhere since you only take out the area you are immediately quilting in.

    (With the longarm, your frame stabilizes for the majority of your quilt, but you still may need pins, etc. depending upon how flat the quilt is and what your quilting plan is.)

    Just my thoughts - hope it helps :)

  3. #28
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    go out and buy a CHEATER'S PANEL batt& back it. PRACTICE on this. usually, they're a baby/ snuggle size. You will not have wasted a quilt top you spent many hrs on! The end pc could be donated to cancer patients, homeless shelter, womens shelter, ect.. Just a win, win idea. good luck!

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuziC
    From looking at the many gorgeous quilts pictured, i wondered about the actual quilting techniques. I know there are hand quilters and machine quilters but i wanted to ask if there are many who still machine quilt with just an average sewing machine? I have seen the long arm quilt machines and will probably never own one nor will i get the expensive computerized ones that quilt for you. I like working one on one with my plain sewing machine to creat the stitching. What are your thoughts on this?
    Look into quilting as you go where you just do a block, quilt it, then join in to another block. I've done a queen-size that way and it was way easier than trying to quilt an entire quilt at one time. Quilt as you go means that you generally don't have anything to the right, all your quilt stays to the left.

  5. #30
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    I'm just learning to do that. It works best if your quilt is not too large . . . around lap sized is a good size (or smaller). I like using the Supreme Slider which just sticks down to your sewing machine bed (with friction, not adhesive). It's a teflon produce and it reduces the drag. And find some gloves you like. People like Machingers. I've ordered a pair, but they haven't come yet. I HATED my Fons & Porter gloves. My clipped threads clung to them like scotch tape.

  6. #31
    Senior Member Twilliebee's Avatar
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    Check out this thread running simultaneously. Lot's of interesting machine quilting info and some great pictures of a work in progress. http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-58147-3.htm#1409066

  7. #32
    Super Member marla's Avatar
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    Did you get an accurrate measurement after quilting the inside, then doing the borders?This does sound interesting.
    marla
    Quote Originally Posted by Midwestmary
    At a recent FMQ class at my LQS, we machine quilted the middle section of our quilt minus the borders. The borders were then attached and quilted. I thought this was a great method to reduce bulk when quilting a large quilt.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sadiemae
    I know several quilters in my area who use domestic machines and they do beautiful work. It is just a little different moving the quilt instead of the machine as longarm machines and some midarm machines do.

    I have used my domestic machine to quilt 4-5 king sized quilts and many queen size. It takes a while, but it can be done. I have a Viking 630 and love it.

  9. #34
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    This is to roselady who was concerned about doing her own quilting after sending many quilts out. DON'T give up trying yourself. I have been sewing, hand quilting, designing and doing upholstery work all my life and guess what, my first attempts at machine quilting were a really big surprise to me. Terrible!!!! Now nearly six years later I have made about 40 quilts and love my BabyLock Quilter's Professional so much that I turned down an offer by my husband to purchase a longarm. I have learned that the more you practice the better you get and every time I start a new project I do some practice sessions just to get in the groove again. I am into thread painting and designing a new wall hanging using a photo I took in the yard recently. I have seen many friends learn to machine quilt in our guild and it is exciting. I practice on the quilts that will be going to our area Womens' shelter as the children don't seem to care how perfect my pattern come out. It helps us both and is good therapy. JC

  10. #35
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    Our grandmothers, great grandmothers and generations of quilters before these had what we would consider primitive tools and methods to use for quilting. Yet there have been some very beautiful quilts from these times. We are now a generation that needs instant results -- Quilt In A Day!!! I fall into this catagory also. The site that someone references a little later in this post stated that one of the quilts which was quilted on a regular machine was nine months in the making. The quilting is the "heart" of the quilt. Would I have the patience to work for nine months on one project???? It would be difficult, but then I remember how much time many generations before us had to spend in creating their quilts and a lot of those quilts were needed for warmth in the winter. I would love having a long arm machine, but have never been able to justify spending that kind of money, especially in today's economy. Soooooooo as for myself, I will try to remember the patience of my ancestors and be glad that I have an electric sewing machine that I can use in a house with Central heat and air, have good lights, tools, a very comfortable chair and do not have to make quilts to keep the family safe and warm.

  11. #36
    Senior Member brightstar_202's Avatar
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    My name is Janet and I am from Ohio. Have any of you girls by chance quilted block by block? That you can do on the machine free arm or by quilting foot. I have tried both and since I am fairly new they both do okay. my quilts are not the top knotch but I have made 20 in the last 2 years for my grand kids and they did not see the mistakes even though I did.

  12. #37
    Senior Member barbrdunn's Avatar
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    I have a Brother 1500 with the wide throat, but have yet to find a stitch in the ditch foot that works weel with it. So I only use it to free motion, and use my Pfaff for everything else.

  13. #38

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    SuziC. I need to ask if you also do genealogy? The Olinger family line?

  14. #39
    Super Member llong0233's Avatar
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    I'm relatively new to quilting. I started with a class through our local community extension services. We made an 8 pointed star block. I did it all by hand and I was hooked. I have since made three small quilts but did the piecing and quilting on my sewing machine. I have a Brother CS6000i. It's just like my mechanical Brother, same number of stitch options, but digital. I do all my quilting on the regular sewing machine and will continue to do so. I like to do my own thing and it can be very expensive to send a quilt out to be quilted on a long-arm. Besides, I'm not sure computerized long-arm quilting is really "quilting". I went to a local quilt show a few weeks ago and saw some beautiful quilts. Some were all hand quilted, others all done long-arm. I don't think they should be shown and judged together. Maybe it's just me but computerized quilting just doesn't seem like it should be compared to or judged with hand quilting. This is probably more information than you wanted in an answer to your question, but there it is. I can't be too much of a "quilt snob" because I do my quilting on my machine, but at least I'm doing it, not a computer.

  15. #40
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    I have one that I quilted mostly by hand and all the others are with my Pfaff 2134.

  16. #41
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tortoisethreads
    I have 2 machines I quilt on, a Husqvarna Viking, and a Singer Touch-Tronic. Both have small throat space, but I have done queen size on them!!!
    before i got lizzie, i used a viking and a janome and made 2 queens and numerous smaller sizes using a variety of techniques.

  17. #42
    Junior Member Campbell34's Avatar
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    I have a new 830 that has a wider throat, but I have made quilts on an older 930 Bernina, do it in 3 sections , works great,I personally feel that my quilts are not done until I quilt them either by hand or by machine, my old 930 does a wonderful job of stippling , drop those dogs and go for it , or straight lines with a walking foot , :thumbup:

  18. #43
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    I am learning to quilt on a regular sewing machine, mine has a larger throat, but not a whole lot of space. God bless. Penny

  19. #44
    Super Member anicra's Avatar
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    I, too, would love a long arm machine but it's not really in my future. About a year ago i finished a king size quilt on my Janome 6600. I only did stippling on it but it went a lot easier than i thought it would and I encourage you to try. I scrunched rather than rolled and found I could control the quilt better. This is is now i my spare room and I love looking at it. Good luck and post a picture when you do a larger quilt.

  20. #45
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    I totally agree!!!!! I cannot imagine how using a computer to quilt my quilt could bring a great deal of satisfaction to my creative nature. Computers are great and have their place, but our old sewing machines and our hands are much more dependable as far as I am concerned.

  21. #46
    Super Member joeyoz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuziC
    From looking at the many gorgeous quilts pictured, i wondered about the actual quilting techniques. I know there are hand quilters and machine quilters but i wanted to ask if there are many who still machine quilt with just an average sewing machine? I have seen the long arm quilt machines and will probably never own one nor will i get the expensive computerized ones that quilt for you. I like working one on one with my plain sewing machine to creat the stitching. What are your thoughts on this?
    I just use my home machine. This is one I just recently did. It's 67 x 67. Queen is just too big for me to handle.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  22. #47
    Super Member llong0233's Avatar
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    Oh!My!Gosh! I can't believe you quilted those precise, beautiful flowers with a regular sewing machine. If I could do work like that on my machine I would NEVER even think about quilting any other way. Congratulation on your beautiful work.

  23. #48
    Senior Member quilting librarian's Avatar
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    [quote=Prism99]

    ...

    Wow! It had never occurred to me to quilt standing on a home machine. I see the long arm quilters do it standing - in fact that is one of the things that appeals to me about long arm machines! I have trouble sitting and find I like doing lots of things better standing. I'm gonna have to figure out a way to do that!

  24. #49
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    I've quilted a couple of king-size quilts on my regular sewing machine; I have a Bernina 180. Do wish it had a bigger throat opening but it can be done. Just choose a small area to quilt, move your quilt and do the next area. Sometimes you have to "fluff and stuff". Also helps to have an area in the back and to the left side to hold the quilt up. But do start off small and work your way up to the larger sizes.

  25. #50
    Senior Member Earleen's Avatar
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    Did my first machine quilting this weekend and don't know if I will ever do it again. Did not turn out as I had wished. Tore it out once before and left it this time.

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