Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 57

Thread: Making Sandwiches ... the Quilt Kind!!!!

  1. #1
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    14,851

    Making Sandwiches ... the Quilt Kind!!!!

    How do you make your sandwiches?

    The most common way now, I'm thinking, is probably on a table.
    I like it and have had good success. Though it is limiting, as the table is only so big! To get more tables and then the storage issue, I am not really keen.

    I'm contemplating "on the wall" sandwiches.

    Have read about them and understand the how to's.
    ... though am wondering is it a good way to go?
    The pros, obviously deal with the lack of table space.
    However, I am wondering what all can go wrong?
    And how to prevent that?
    Or what else I need to know before trying a wall sandwich.
    ............ Or is it even a road I should want to go down ... or avoid?

    I'm hoping some experienced sandwich makers can share their experiences and insights to this wannabe!

    And too, I'm open to other sandwiching techniques!
    Please do share!!

    THANK YOU!!!!
    Last edited by QuiltE; 01-25-2013 at 07:24 AM.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  2. #2
    Senior Member Donnamarie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Woburn, MA
    Posts
    560
    I always sandwich my quilts on a table top. Even if it is too small, you can work in sections. I lie the backing wrong side up and tape the edges so it is somewhat taunt. Then I lie the batting down, flatten out with a yard stick, and the same for the front. Always smooth out everything before you begin to pin (or baste). Not sure how you would do that on a wall. Good luck!

  3. #3
    Power Poster gabeway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    10,488
    I tried on the wall but didn't like it do do it on table.
    Wayne & Gabriele, the married quilters.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    401
    I make mine on a 6' banquet style table I have, although I could also use my dining room table if I wanted to and not have to set up the folding one. I've never used more than the one at a time, I just do it in sections, starting in the middle of the quilt top. I've always thread basted, but the last one I did, I completely glue basted with Elmer's School glue and let it dry for about an hour in between sections. No pins, no needle and thread, easy as can be, and even accounting for the drying time, still quicker for me than thread basting like I used to do. I just finished quilting it, and it's so nice and smooth on both sides, didn't gum up my machine needle and I just went and bought a whole bunch more glue. Never going back to my old way. :-)

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    1,211
    I'm not sure about the wall either. I use my sewing table to make the sandwich. I have two tables, one for cutting and storing FQs, the other for ironing, and basting.

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,294
    I'm fortunate in having a wide passthrough between kitchen and dining room - probably should have been a breakfast bar, but I have a large cutting mat on it and use that for sandwiching...tape the backing wrong side up, add batting and top, pin then move the whole thing up to do the next section.

    have been wanting to try the wall technique but this one works so well haven't tried the other. The weight of the fabric below will keep the fabric taut. Disadvantage is the possibility that spray adhesive can get on walls and floor - but newspaper taped to wall and to floor can handle that.
    Kate

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,045
    I have a large peice of plywood on my 6 ft banquet table. I use binding clips to hold the backing and also use spray basting instead of pins. Also I start my sandwiching on a side edge instead of the middle. That way I only usually have to move it 1 time. You just have to make sure that there is enough backing for the quilt. I can not see how you van get all the layers smooth if hanging on a wall.

  8. #8
    Super Member Anael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    4,544
    I tape the backing to the floor of my spare bedroom, tape batting on top of backing and top on top of backing, use lots of pins and remove the tape very carefully. For small quilts I use my dining table which is quite large.
    Eat, quilt, sleep, repeat



  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    413
    I tried the wall method with a queen size quilt. It did not work for me. Maybe if I had a helper or used different batting. I used a wool blend batting and the 'stretch' of that was difficult to get it to hang straight. I eventually had to call it quits and use tables.

    If it is a large bed size quilt, I will use to banquet tables. I actually place pieces of poster board over the 'join' of the tables. (My tables have rounded edges which leaves a slight gap along the edge where they meet. I will then use either basting spray or saftey pins to baste everything on the top of the tables. Once the center is done, I shift the quilt to reach the other areas.

  10. #10
    Super Member dublb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Brady TX
    Posts
    5,905
    First QE I will say that my PC quilt will be my first large quilt, so I can't say much about how large quilts can be done on the wall. However I do all my quilts on the wall, & I use wool battin' for everythin'. I used ta put the newspaper up on the wall first but have just become way too lazy for that. The wall needs ta be painted anyway. (Once I paint it I will start protectin' it again.) It takes me 1/3 o' the time on the wall. I can find the link ta instructions if ya need 'em.
    Bev
    My initials are BB, so dublb is double B.

  11. #11
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    14,851
    BTW ... I didn't mention it, but I will be spray basting, and not the pinning or hand basting methods.

    For those doing it in sections and then shifting it ... how do you keep it even and smooth?
    My hesitations here are that it'd not be consistent and then would be uneven in the end.

    LakeKids ... that's exactly what I fear ... that I'd be wishing I was an octopus. Or would get started at it and have one gooey mess! Did you do any smaller sandwiches first to practice on the wall? I'm thinking that might be the way to start .... table topper, then graduate upwards with experience?

    DublB ... always glad to have more how to's to read and maybe there'll be some great aha moments! The backing I see as not so much a problem ... start taping it to the wall and keep at it til it's flat, square and even. Then how do you get going at the batting? Spray the backing then add the batting? Then what about when you add the top ... spray the top before taking it to the wall. Did you get the feeling you needed extra hands? Please tell me more!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  12. #12
    Super Member hudgoddess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    In the mountains near Black Hawk, CO
    Posts
    1,186
    So far my knees and back are still good enough to do it on the floor. I like having everything laid out flat and smooth.

  13. #13
    Super Member dublb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Brady TX
    Posts
    5,905
    QE After ya tape the backin' ta the wall ya spray it. Then ya tape the battin' along the top & smooth it. If ya are doin' a small quilt ya don't even have ta tape it up there as the spray will hold it. Next spray the battin' & tape the front up at the top, smooth it out. I have never had ta tape the top up there as it just stays up w/the spray. Again I have never done a large quilt. Twin has my biggest so far.
    Here is the instructions that I learned it from.
    http://www.thequiltshow.com/os/blog.php/blog_id/2566
    Bev
    My initials are BB, so dublb is double B.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Cagey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Southern Wisconsin
    Posts
    826
    When I first started quilting I used my tabletop or the floor which is impossible for someone my age. Then my DH made me a very large board to hang on the basement wall. Didn't like it so I took the large board off the wall and put it on top of my table when I make the sandwich. Using the board on the wall made the fabric drape funny and I couldn't get the fabric tension right. Using the board on the table works great.

  15. #15
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,699
    I'm right behind Minstrel. Have been thread basting in sections but I'm now moving
    to the Elmer's school glue side.

    QuiltE, when I baste in sections, I fold top, backing and batting in fourths. Put a
    mark at each point (north, south, east, west). Use bull dog clips to secure the
    backing to the table. Smooth everything down. Do the same for the batting and
    top. Once you've basted the middle, you can move the sandwich easily keeping
    your registered marks lined up.

  16. #16
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    29,887
    I spray basted a baby quilt on the back of my garage door in the summer. I used masking tape every 4 inches to tape the backing up (a pin through each masking tape on the the fabric edge.) I sprayed the back and smoothed on the batt. I then sprayed the batt again and smoothed out the front. I was afraid that the weight of the sandwich would pull down the quilt from the tape but it held. If I was to do a larger quilt, I would use some other method to attach the back up because I don't think tape would be strong enough. I did like doing it on the back of the garage door because I didn't have to worry about fumes or overspray.

  17. #17
    Super Member BluegrassGurl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    1,527
    Blog Entries
    1
    I use the table method with two 1"x4"x10' boards for my quilt top and backing. It works great for me. I saw this method on Sharon Schamber's youtube video and love it. The only thing different I do is I use a fine point basting gun.... she does hand basting.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhwNylePFAA

    I went ahead and posted steps of how I do it for a large quilt below:

    Step 1: Lay backing on table (wrong side up). Tape edge of backing on board and roll onto board slowly.... straightening as you go. Hint: I use painters tape. Put board aside.
    Step 2: Lay quilt top on table (right side up). Tape edge of quilt top on the other board and roll onto board slowly .... straightening as you go.
    Step 3: Place "board with backing" on table, allign as needed and unroll to edge of table.
    Step 4: Place batting over backing, allign/smooth as needed... let the "extra" lay over edge of the table.
    Step 5: Place "board with top" over batting, allign/smooth as needed and unroll to edge of 'backing' board.
    Step 6: Baste unrolled area
    Step 7: Pull basted edge off front of table to the point where the boards are on the edge.
    Step 8: Pull batting over front edge of table, unroll backing ...... bring batting over unrolled backing.... letting extra hang over table...... unroll quilt top to edge of backing board.
    **Repeat step 8 until quilt is basted.

    The great thing about this method is that if the table you are using is not wide enough to accomodate the quilt, you can easily manipulate moving it with the boards.

    Hope this helps!

  18. #18
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    ELVERTA, CA
    Posts
    15,273
    Blog Entries
    1
    Check out Patsy Thompson's method on youtube

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwV8tUkhxUM

    I wish I had a wall where I could put up those tiles.
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

  19. #19
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Camarillo, California
    Posts
    35,480
    I am fortunate to have my church close by and keys to the building and lots of tables to gather together, they are even height adjustable and I have a husband and several dear friends to help me. I do spray baste. I am working on an extra large queen, almost king size and the usual 3 tables are not going to be big enough to sandwich this baby. Not sure if I will set up 6 tables (cause we will not be able to even come close to reaching the middle) or if we will use 3 and have to shift it.


    My newest Grandson, Caleb Austin, was born May 29th. I am now Grandma to 4 precious babies. I am so blessed!!!!

  20. #20
    Senior Member Blue's quilting mama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    754
    If it fits on my bed, that is where I do my sandwiching. I use the cutting mat between the bedding and the backing, to prevent the pins from getting into the blankets, quilt, etc. Since I usually only make big lap sized, most fit nicely, the height is good, and don't have to get down on the floor.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    430
    I do spray basting on the wall in the garage and hubby staples each piece of the sandwich as we put it up. It works great and taking out the staples is a no brainer. The holes that are left on the edge of the quilt will be cut off anyway, so that's not a problem either. Love 505 spray basting.
    aka Gale

  22. #22
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Knot Merrill, Southern Indiana
    Posts
    5,713
    Ok ... I'll weigh in here and you know I had a recent experience with spray basting.

    First ... the reasons I love and hate spray basting.

    Love it for the result. It's smooth, the basting is complete (ie no "un-basted" areas), I don't have to pull pins out or get basting stitches caught in my hopping foot ... I just put the quilt down and GO, it stays basted for a good long time, and you can pull it apart to adjust then stick it back down.

    Hate it for one reason only ... the mess. The overspay - which cannot be avoided. I'm not talking about overspray of the area you are aiming at ... I'm talking about the particles of mist that WILL drift through whatever room you are basting in. It's inevitable with an aerosol product ... it drifts.

    Soooo .... as you know I recently waited patiently for a decent warmish day with little wind to bring my quilt outside to spray baste. For this quilt spray basting was the best option because I was using minky as the backing and minky is slinky - or as my LQS lady said as she was (attemping to) fold the minky "it's like wrestling a wet seal".

    So what I did was spray baste outside, then bring my quilt top indoors and spread it out on the minky which was laying on the floor. Yes ... I needed a friend to help me. Depending on the size of the quilt (wider than the span of my arms?) and the weight of the backing (minky is heavy) and batting, I may not be able to use a wall. The width of this quilt was wider than the span of my arms so I could not place it in place with any confidence. The minky is heavy and and its a knit so I was concerned that it would be stretched at the bottom. So on the floor it went, and yes we did have to adjust it (the adjusting I did on my table). If I had a table large enough I would have used that, but I didn't want to do it on a table where the sides had to drag off the edge.

    So IF you decide on spray basting 1) find a friend and 2) do it either outside or in a room/place where you don't care if everything around it gets sticky.

    I really really LOVE spray basting ... so many pro's ... I just need to work around the one big con.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  23. #23
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    14,851
    Thanks Everyone ... for your comments and ideas.
    I really appreciate it and if you have more, please keep adding them.

    Some direct comments .........
    DublB and MadQuilter ... thanks for the video. Hearing a professional does make it seem realistic to do it. Interesting that it is not just a regular wall, but that she has used the ceiling tiles under the quilt so she can pin into it. Looks like I might be better to do it on my design wall, than the real wall.

    BluegrassGirl ... thanks for the video too. I've looked at it before, but it looks so complicated. I think I'd have the boards flipping all over the place! Though I;m not saying it's out of the question.

    Tartan ... well, they are expecting us to have a big meltdown next week! Though, I don;t think I'd be doing it then! I've actually looked around my garage but no wall space big enough. Outdoors, certainly would be a really good soslution to the overspray issues and Mother Nature would do the wash up after!

    DHMom ... you just hit on the concerns I have about not being able to reach across a quilt as I work. Overspray is a concern ITA. Yes, no doubt it drifts thru the air ... but I haven;t noticed a problem with it attaching on the edges of the table I use or onto the floor.

    Jim'sGem ... I wish the church was an option, but no, they won't allow it. Community halls here are only available at their high rental rates!
    I wish sending it out to have the basting done was an option ... but it really isn't!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  24. #24
    Super Member dublb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Brady TX
    Posts
    5,905
    QE I just remembered another thing. I use the old fashion maskin' tape ta tape it up. The tan one. The blue tape won't stick & everything falls. I also put 2 pieces at each point that I tape along the top. I make an X w/it.
    Bev
    My initials are BB, so dublb is double B.

  25. #25
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Monroe, IN
    Posts
    2,285
    I do all my sandwiches on our 8' pool table, which has a vinyl cover. I can spread out a quilt to get half of it completely on the table. I use Elmer's liquid glue to baste.....best method I have found so far.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.