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Thread: Mending a Hole Made From Seam Ripping

  1. #1
    Super Member JENNR8R's Avatar
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    Mending a Hole Made From Seam Ripping

    I managed to make a 3/4-inch hole in one of my seams as I was ripping. I was pretty dismayed until I thought to fuse the back of the hole with a small strip of fabric using Lite Steam-a-Seam II. It worked like a charm! The hole was repaired, and I couldn't tell the hole was ever there.

    How have you handled the problem in the past?

  2. #2
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    Thanks for this idea to patch holes! 3/4-inch is a very large hole and I'm so happy for you in fixing it. I haven't had this big of a goof, but I'd just cry a lot.

  3. #3
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    Good tip! Thanks! I will remember this one.

  4. #4
    Power Poster
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    Good save and I have not made a hole in a quilt......yet.

  5. #5
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    i'm glad to hear you had a successful result. once, on a larger hole, i appliqued a new block over the damaged one.
    Nancy in western NY
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  6. #6
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    Been there done that. Thanks for the tip on the repair. In the past I replaced the piece of the block but next time I'll try your way. sounds perfect.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the creative idea and thank you for sharing.

  8. #8
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    Yes, I have had to do this a couple of times in my quilting life. Not happy situation, but this solution worked well for me. The "lesson" be more careful.

  9. #9
    Junior Member Tippysmom's Avatar
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    Yes, whatever has been done incorrectly, I can sympathize with you because I’ve done it!! I made several boo-boos on a Christmas quilt top (holes) and I just appliquéd over them. I’ve become much more careful when ripping out stitches!

  10. #10
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I make sure to only cut the thread. Years ago I would try to hurry and did cut the fabric.
    Another Phyllis
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  11. #11
    Super Member Darcyshannon's Avatar
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    I have used steam a seam before. It does work. I also quilt carefully over the area. Glad you repaired it and are happy with results.

  12. #12
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
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    One time I was preparing a quilt for quilting on the longarm. I discovered a block that didn't get sewn into the seam. I knew it would be a problem quilting it, so I simply ironed a piece of fusible interfacing over the gap on the backside.... problem solved.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-02-2019 at 03:39 AM. Reason: PM

  13. #13
    Super Member Snooze2978's Avatar
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    I've used steam a seam and a product called Bonash when my quilt machine stopped with the needle down but my robotics kept going. Luckily I was right there when it happened so I could stop the robotics before it ripped clear across my quilt. This happened a couple times until I was able to convince the machine company there was a problem with their machine. The Bonash uses heat to bind the product they have to sprinkle over the hole. Think they also ask you to add a piece of the fabric under the hole too. I had to do this to both sides but it worked. It was my mother's quilt this happened to and its been 7 years now and the area has never come apart. Otherwise a suggestion would be to add an applique over the hole to hide it on both sides if necessary.

    As to ripping a hole with your ripper, I find pulling out the seam from one side or the other and not down the middle my best bet. I also ripped a hole when I went down the middle of the seam. True, its faster and easier but I like safer for me as my hands tend to tremble at times so I go for safer in my case.
    Suz in Iowa
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  14. #14
    Super Member d.rickman's Avatar
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    When I repaired an very old quilt, and didn't want to add anything, but to keep it as good as
    it was. I just opened up the worn out pieces, tucked in a piece of voile (tiny lace, like they
    use in crinolines) with a piece of steam a seam attached, removed the paper from the steam a seam
    and lightly stitch
    over the edges. The voile (lace) will keep it all intact and not take away the integrity of the
    quilt. Great to hear your repair worked out.
    Quilting People are the Best, Have a great sewing day!
    DonnaJ

  15. #15
    Member marymild's Avatar
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    This will sound scary, but I have found using a rotary cutter instead of a seam ripper works much better. It only cuts the thread between the two fabrics. It never rips fabric. I separate the two fabrics with one hand and put the rotary cutter between them, and it only cuts the thread. I have used whatever rotary cutter is closest, but I prefer the smaller one.

  16. #16
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    Thanks for tip. Great idea.

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