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Thread: Mock Binding

  1. #1
    Steve's Avatar
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    Am finishing up my first quilt and having left the backing about an inch and a half larger all round with the decision to mock bind I'm a bit confused about mitering the corners.

    I'm basting and then doubling the fold inward for added thickness pressing as I go, pinning the corners at each fold. Any suggestion for perfectly mitered corners?

  2. #2
    Steve's Avatar
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    I found this link, but am doubling the binding up:

    http://www.fabriclandwest.com/quilters%20corner/binding_mock.htm

  3. #3
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    once you've folded in, treat the two layers as though they were one. use the same method you'd use for any "back as mitred binding".

    this is the way i do it.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
    Steve's Avatar
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    So after trimming make the double folds on the corners and sides, press, pin and sew. Sounds easy. The instructions pointed out one aspect I hadnít considered which was item three on the second diagram. Iíd been practice cornering to the outer edge rather than giving it a bit to stitch into (go figure). Thanks Patrice, this was exactly what I needed to reinforce the idea.

    Do a lot of quilterís use this technique? It seems the easiest and most practical method to produce an outer binding. I like it because it hints at the backing fabric, though I do suppose a pieced edge would be pretty as well.

  5. #5
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    i'm tickled pink you found it useful. :P

    i don't know how commonly used the method is. my "gut" feeling is that it isn't used as often as most of the others. i haven't used it as often as i should, but that's usually because i too often foolishly forget to choose a backing fabric that would look great as a binder, too.

    i have lots of "V8" moments as i execute the final stages of just about every project. :shock: :lol: :?

  6. #6
    Steve's Avatar
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    I've been a tad neurotic on all the fabric purchases (as I am with all things), buying my piecing and backing fabric to match. I suppose that once I start utilizing the scrap pieces different approaches will follow. I'm fond of piece borders, so will give that a go shortly too. The most beautiful pieced quilt bindings to me are the Seminole chevrons, and Prairie points. Itís strange to me how the most well executed quilt top can fail utterly without a good backing, border and binding.

  7. #7
    ccbear66's Avatar
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    I used the mock binding on the baby quilt that I tied. My corners didn't turn out very well but I was still pleased with the way it turned out for my first quilt. I have two more baby quilts at the quilters now and I left enough of the backing to also mock bind them. I'll post pics once I get them back which should be in a couple of weeks.

  8. #8
    Steve's Avatar
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    Oh kayÖ so Iíve got it pinned and ready to sew finally. The double corner was easy but took a while to figure what to do first. I encountered a minor disaster that I had to deal with when I accidentally sliced a Ĺ into the backing, right where I planned to turn it. Repaired and ready to go though, but Iím off to work and it will have to wait. GrrrÖ

    I was thinking I might stitch the corners where they meet on the lower edge at the miter as a cautionary measure. Has anyone done this? 've got the corners pinned but thought it might be better to stitch them.

  9. #9
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    if it feels right ... stitch it. :-)

  10. #10
    Steve's Avatar
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    Well, I did the binding and all but finished. The corners are less than what I wanted but pretty good. I'm toying with the idea of turning them inward at a 45-degree angle and taking what points there are off just so it looks a bit neater. I liked the experience but am unsure at this point if I'll try it again. Maybe once I get more experience with sewing it will come easier. I did get to use the walking foot, which at first threw me for a loop, but I got the hang of it by the time I made it Ďround the quilt. I must admit, itís a pretty handsome quilt for someone who is just starting out and doesnít really know much about sewing. Iíll post a picture after I decide about (and possibly do more to) the corners and wash it.

  11. #11
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    corners and triangles are among the hardest things to get right. i'll bet it looks better than you think it does, but if you see a way to improve it, that's what you should do. each technique works best for different quilters. that's why there are so many techniques. :wink:

    i lost my mind last weekend and started a quilt with way too many triangles. (way too many is defined as "more than one!") it does NOT help that they are all 1/16th too small! didn't figure that out until i was almost through with the first 18 blocks.

    never mind. i'll just make 9 3/4" blocks instead of 10" blocks. it's my quilt, dadburnit. i can do what i want.

    can't i? :shock:

  12. #12
    Senior Member annmarie's Avatar
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    YUP!!!! :wink:

  13. #13
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    Patrice, Iíve been reading about triangles and how to figure the size when cutting. It sounds a bit confusing so Iíve decided to make a square, cut it in half on the diagonal, sew it together and measure to figure how big the size of squares for the piece (quarter inch seam already included). A bit unorthodox and backward but I donít see why it canít work; and I suppose figuring quarter triangles could be done the same way. I might be figuring all wrong, but if it works, cool. Now watch me get some weird 2 - 3/16th-inch square to work with!

    The quilt actually looks nice and I think Iím just going to take a couple of blind stitches on each corner to close them up. Have decided to subtly embroider my initials and the year in the corner with a daisy stitch (I think thatís what itís called) with a dark thread. Iíll wash and dry it then take pictures for you all. My mind is already at work on the second quilt. Yay!


  14. #14
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I have a suggestion regarding making triangles. Take a piece of paper the size of the square of fabric you have chosen to make. Cut it in half diagonally and then fold or cut the seam allowance off. That would give you the finished size. This also would work for quarter square triangles. Hope this helps :) Can't wait to see a picture of your quilt!

  15. #15
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    the "match" for half-square triangles is easy. just add 7/8ths of an inch to the finished size of the square.

    3" block finished.
    cut the squares 3-7/8ths inch square
    draw a diagonal line down the middle
    put that square face down on a square of the contrasting fabric
    draw another line 1/4" to the left, and a third line 1/4" to the right of the center diagonal line
    sew on the left and right lines
    cut them apart

    voila!

  16. #16

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    :lol:

    Hi Steve,
    I thought I was the only one who preferred binding a quilt (mock binding) that way. I called it "lazy binding" not realizing there was an actual term. How funny. It is just so much easier to do than traditional binding that I often struggle with.
    I am new to quilting and that seems easiest. However, I am embarking on a new binding...prairie points. One of my quilts that is ready to be quilted has bright colored pointy stars in it and I think it will enhance the quilt when finished.

  17. #17
    Steve's Avatar
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    I've thought of using prairie points when I get the Hawaiian quilt done, years from now no doubt. I'm also toying with usuing alternating shades of green, like leaves.

  18. #18

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    OHHH! What a fantastic idea!

  19. #19
    Steve's Avatar
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    Yeah, because I'm new at it this first piece is going to go to make a pillow, just so that I can familiarize myself with the slipstitch and echoing. Then I plan to do a series of small flowers separately and panel them together. So far I've got the material for four color combinations (including the same scheme I'm working on now). I've stayed away from greens other than the celery color since I plan to sash, border and bind with it. I'd like to find some neat old Hawaiian print material for the backing, hula girls or swaying palms.

    The color combos I've picked up so far are the celery and Mineola, red and white, royal purple on aqua blue and a bright fuchsia on yellow. I'd like to figure a couple more so as to have six flowers, but am unsure of others that would go. Maybe a gold and brown and royal blue with something else, bright and bold combinations in other words. What will be a challenge is designing flowers that are sufficiently different from each other and not to tough for my skills. I figure the stitching will improve over the course of the quilt and to save the harder ones for last.

    Sounds like a project huh? At least the planning and preparation stages are underway and the applique can be done at work away from the patchworks I'm doing.
    :D

  20. #20
    Senior Member k_jupiter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatriceJ
    the "match" for half-square triangles is easy. just add 7/8ths of an inch to the finished size of the square.

    3" block finished.
    cut the squares 3-7/8ths inch square
    draw a diagonal line down the middle
    put that square face down on a square of the contrasting fabric
    draw another line 1/4" to the left, and a third line 1/4" to the right of the center diagonal line
    sew on the left and right lines
    cut them apart

    voila!
    Better yet, cut the squares 4 1/4 then do as Patrice says. Trim your slightly oversize blocks to exactly 3" with the diagonal very precisely right on. Takes an hour more for 50 some triangle squares, but it's worth it.

    tim in san jose

  21. #21
    Steve's Avatar
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    My mom says they received the quilt and took it up to deliver it. Anya (the babyís mother) and her mom visiting from the Ukraine were very pleased. My aunt and all couldnít believe it was my first and gave me thumbs up. It turned out that unknown to me the babyís room was greens and yellows. Cool

    One other thing that choked me up totally (yeah, so what, Iím a wussy), they had a dinner party at my folks and afterwards Anyaís mom announced she wanted to make a speech (Anya interpreted the Russian). She said that what make America great wasnít its wealth or power, but its strong sense of family. Yeah, I know for the most part we as Americans feel a bit like our families are dysfunctional at best, but that an outsider can look to us (Americans) with such admiration blew me away and really touched me. I guess that is why quilting is great as well; it adds to that same sense of family.

    Learning to quilt then has then taught me another invaluable lesson: though not perfect, the love we stitch into what ever we do holds together and strengthens that bond. Family and friendship, love and quilting, is a winning combination in my book.

  22. #22
    lin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve
    My mom says they received the quilt and took it up to deliver it. Anya (the babyís mother) and her mom visiting from the Ukraine were very pleased. My aunt and all couldnít believe it was my first and gave me thumbs up. It turned out that unknown to me the babyís room was greens and yellows. Cool

    One other thing that choked me up totally (yeah, so what, Iím a wussy), they had a dinner party at my folks and afterwards Anyaís mom announced she wanted to make a speech (Anya interpreted the Russian). She said that what make America great wasnít its wealth or power, but its strong sense of family. Yeah, I know for the most part we as Americans feel a bit like our families are dysfunctional at best, but that an outsider can look to us (Americans) with such admiration blew me away and really touched me. I guess that is why quilting is great as well; it adds to that same sense of family.

    Learning to quilt then has then taught me another invaluable lesson: though not perfect, the love we stitch into what ever we do holds together and strengthens that bond. Family and friendship, love and quilting, is a winning combination in my book.
    *Applause, applause*!!! That's wonderful Steve. Makes every stitch worth the time it took to make it. :)

  23. #23
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    Hi All, Patrice I use to use the 7/8th method, but always had some problems with the finished size. I read this method and it works perfect for me. I just add 1 inch to my finished size then when finished with all squares measure and square as needed. You will be suprised how many are the correct size you want. Just though I would through that in! Oh and thanks for the tute on the binding. I have never tried but my next project I will give it a go! Happy Quilting :D

  24. #24
    Country Quilter's Avatar
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    I always add an inch and trim to size....it makes life SO much easier! Sometimes the stitching can be wonky so you need that extra to make it square up!

    Steve...touching story! Glad your quilt worked out for you ... did you post a pic?

    My MIL always made her quilts with the mock binding....I'm unsure if thats the way I want to do the ones she left for me to finish (another post) or if I will do traditional binding....worst thing is...they are all polyester so think it would be easiest to just do the mock binding and machine stitch them!

  25. #25
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    Yeah, thats the way I do my HST's. I am okay with regular binding, even do double sided, but if the mock is easier then for some projects why not. I let all know how mine turns out. Think I will try on a table runner.

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