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Thread: mother board

  1. #1
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    i just got a call from my service man to tell me the "mother board' hs gone out on my brother pc6000 pacesetter.$400.00 for parts,etc.even tho it's only been used less than 2 yrs,it s still 12 yrs old,so hate to put that much money into it & still have a 12 yr old machine.hERE'S WHERE I NEED YOUR opinion...i can trade it up to a new one,but am sure i'll have to go WAY up.i have a brand new janome2010 that i LOVE for piecing,etc but would love to have a larger throat for quilting.also would like to have an embroidrey machione,but can't affod $1000 or more any suggestions ?i've been leaning toward viking or pfaff ,but don't want to jump into something i'll regret.even refurbwoud be fine .since i have a sewing machine i'm happy with [except for a longer throat] i'm really leaning toward an embroidery/only machine, HELP

  2. #2
    Super Member franie's Avatar
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    You are not the first person to have their mother board go out. A friend had hers redone and it went out again. don't remember the machine but I don't think it was a Brother.

  3. #3
    Super Member Quilter7x's Avatar
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    The new Janome Horizon has a great throat size, but I don't think it does emobroidery.

    I'm glad you're not going to have yours fixed, because who knows what else might happen with an machine of that age.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by franie
    You are not the first person to have their mother board go out. A friend had hers redone and it went out again. don't remember the machine but I don't think it was a Brother.
    I suggest plugging the machines into a power strip with SURGE SUPRESSION. these strips may cost a bit more but if the power is wonky in the house, or there's a lightning strike, it can save your electronics. Also, unplug the machine when not in use.

  5. #5
    Super Member QBeth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quilter7x
    I'm glad you're not going to have yours fixed, because who knows what else might happen with an machine of that age.
    Interesting, isn't it, that there's very little debate about fixing an electronic, relatively new machine?! But, when it comes to old machines like the Featherweights and Treadles, there's no question - get it fixed, if you can! Makes one think, doesn't it?!

  6. #6
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    Although I admire the early engineering in old sewing machines I don't particularly want to own one so I understand your computerized sewing machine delimma. This isn't a mechanical vs. computerized issue. It is basically what is the most efficient, cost effective way to achieve your sewing wishes.

    I think your decision comes down to several factors: is the replacement motherboard refurbished or new, is the motherboard the only electronic part (if so replacement might be acceptable), how much is the machine worth in working condition, how much would it cost to repair, how much a new machine costs... The engineer comes out in me when it comes down to things like this. I know this is a huge decision for most of us. I like to get the most versatility out of any machine I own.

    Did your machine go down because of age or was it caused by something insurance covered? If it was something like a power surge or lightning your homeowners policy might cover it (mine does).

  7. #7
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    By the way, I love my Pfaff and think it is great. If you get something that emboiders make sure the software is still supported and is compatible with the newer computer operating systems (O/S) like Vista and Windows 7. A lot of places are selling machines very cheaply right now because the new O/S have made the software for those machines obsolete and you can't run it on computers with updated software. It is an easy trap and some dealers won't talk about it unless you pin them down.

  8. #8
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    A new motherboard will give you a 'new machine' which will last quite a few more years. I don't think sewing machines are quite like computers where cpu and other chips etc can fail but my daughter needed two replaced in her Janome 11000 within 2 months this year - shop owner said it was caused by "condensation from her evaporative air conditioning and not covered by warranty for second replacement - Fortunately for her, it was covered and she seems quite happy with it now.

    Weigh up cost of total replacement with new machine - embroidery machines are fun - Brother do a Disney version of my Innovis 4000D and I like the quality of stitching.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ada Shiela
    A new motherboard will give you a 'new machine' which will last quite a few more years. I don't think sewing machines are quite like computers where cpu and other chips etc can fail but my daughter needed two replaced in her Janome 11000 within 2 months this year - shop owner said it was caused by "condensation from her evaporative air conditioning and not covered by warranty for second replacement - Fortunately for her, it was covered and she seems quite happy with it now.

    Weigh up cost of total replacement with new machine - embroidery machines are fun - Brother do a Disney version of my Innovis 4000D and I like the quality of stitching.
    Sorry, that was meant to be a 'smaller' version of my 4000D

  10. #10
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    the mother board went out on my long arm last year...boy did that cause some stress! especially since i was about 1/2 way through quilting a customer quilt...i called the company told them what happened...they told me what they believed the problem was...and had a 'reconditioned' mother board for $100 sent it to me in michigan from utah...i had it in about 4 days...
    could you possibly get a refurbished one for your machine? or do you really just want a new machine? I have a viking designer one, and love it...

  11. #11
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    If you replace the motherboard, would the new one come with a warranty? If so, I'd be tempted to go that route.

    Last year the motherboard went on my Viking 400. I was quoted at least $300 and no guarantee that they could get a new one. Only 30 day warranty on the repair. Since the machine was about 16 years old, I opted for a new machine.

    It's tough decision these days. Everything seems to be designed to be thrown away rather than repaired.

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    Okay its no secret why I dont do modern machines but if I were you just take a look at a Singer 500A. To me this is a modern machine because you have to plug it in the wall......but its a vintage machine!

    This was the top of the line machine in 1962 and the machine can hang with any of the new ones on the market in my opinion. It has a plethora of built in stitches and you can pick up the cams and have a huge selection of decorative stitches. You can have the needle set and the left, right or center position, if you have a hoop you can get the monogram letters and do your own monograming. It will do embroidery work but it is FM and you can run a twin needle on it.

    The average price for one is around $200 to $300 depending on the amount of accessories and the cabinet, but you can not kill it and the parts are readily available. Also it can be used as a portable like the FW's.

    Billy

  13. #13
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
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    OUCH I'm reallllly sorry to hear that your mother board went out...

    especially because I have the Brother PC6000 also.

    Did something happen, like other suggest, with electric current?

    I don't think mine is 12 years old and it would be a tough decision if I had to make one but I think I'd just get a new machine for the $400. I'm betting there are a lot of machines on the market NOW that are similar to the PC6000 for about the $400...which is no where near what I paid for it new!

    I'll hug my machine and talk nice when I sew the next time! LOL

  14. #14
    Super Member tolepainter54's Avatar
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    General rule of thumb is, if the repair is half the cost of a new machine, better off to buy new. That being said, you have to take into consideration how well built older machines can be compared to new ones. I have a Viking D1 that I bought used and I love it. Good luck with your decision.

  15. #15
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lostn51
    Okay its no secret why I dont do modern machines but if I were you just take a look at a Singer 500A. To me this is a modern machine because you have to plug it in the wall......but its a vintage machine!

    This was the top of the line machine in 1962 and the machine can hang with any of the new ones on the market in my opinion. It has a plethora of built in stitches and you can pick up the cams and have a huge selection of decorative stitches. You can have the needle set and the left, right or center position, if you have a hoop you can get the monogram letters and do your own monograming. It will do embroidery work but it is FM and you can run a twin needle on it.

    The average price for one is around $200 to $300 depending on the amount of accessories and the cabinet, but you can not kill it and the parts are readily available. Also it can be used as a portable like the FW's.

    Billy
    I have a Singer 328 K with the cams that will do all the above. I've put many a mile on it before upgrading to newer machines. I still have it and it works great. I bought it new in 1962 or 1963.

  16. #16
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    Computerized vs. mechanical...the big debate. A hotly contested one on this board. I've killed a mechanical machine so nothing is impossible. There are goods and bads with everything you decide to sew on. I "own" an electrical engineer and DD married a soon-to-be one. Electronic and computerized are not bad words in my home. We've repaired many machines (mechanical and computerized) and its a toss-up.

    Everyone has a bias and will tell you their opinion. When it comes down to it, you are the one who has to decide. I like free-motion embroidery because I can't sit still long enough to let the machine do the work for me. Yes, the machine's embroidery is more perfect but to me that is a drawback.

    I prefer my machine for many reasons and really don't like a fully mechanical machine. Old mechanical machines have advantages, my nephews and I disassemble them and scavenge them for robot parts at times (yes, we put them back...mostly) but I have to admit I don't like sewing on them.

  17. #17
    Super Member kristen0112's Avatar
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    I have a Singer Futura 250, it does embroidery and I do piecing on it but the throat is not that big. I recently bought a Flynn Quilting Frame and set it up and was able to quilt using that I haven't done anything big on it yet...I believe that Singer made some improvements on the Futura line there is a 350 version. They run under a $1000.00. The upside is that you hook up your sewing machine to your computer for the embroidery functions, i.e. there's no mother board in your sewing machine to go out. I have been pleased with it, I got it as an early Christmas present last year and made all kinds of things for Christmas.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by lab fairy
    Computerized vs. mechanical...the big debate. A hotly contested one on this board.
    This is funny, Pam (Pam1966) and I were talking about me servicing her computerized machine and I told her that they sorta intimidate me. which is really silly in a way because I can work on vintage sewing machines and the computer that my wife is on right now I built 3 years ago and there is still not a computer on the market that can compete with it.

    But you put the two together it just messes me up LOL!!!:lol: :lol: :lol:

    Billy

  19. #19
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    Billy, I really think it has more to with what we used to call "form and function" in those design, tech and engineering courses. Some people are just purists and there is nothing wrong with that. There are also some integrated systems where you scratch your head and go "what were they thinking?" That happens a LOT. We've built several of our home computers but often don't bother. It really depends on what we want to do with them. The really "custom" one somehow went to college. I hope it graduates someday.

  20. #20
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
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    Whatever you decide, get yourself a really good surge protector and a UPS (uninterrupted power supply) unit. They are fantastic for anything computerised or surge sensitive. Also if you are in a humid environment a dehumidifier is not a bad idea either.

  21. #21
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    Here's my two cents about embroidery-only machines: You are working from a tiny screen on the machine, which isn't easy to see. If you have the option of an embroidery module attachment, which generally requires the use of a laptop computer, it's less convenient to have to use the laptop, but much easier on the eyes because you have a larger screen to work with, and better control with a larger keyboard. I hope I'm understanding your question.

  22. #22
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    I love your beautiful cat!!!! :thumbup: :XD: :wink: :lol: :lol:

  23. #23
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    Yes, new motherboard would come with warranty in!!

  24. #24
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    in regards to the being obsolete due the new win 7 or vista, at least where Bernina is concerned, they have downloads to take that problem away. In speaking with Pfaff dealership here locally, she can really use sall the machines, but to ask her a question pertaining to the downloads or something in that nature.. she actually couldn't answer me. Which I thought was surprising. But went on line to pfaff.com and was able to get infor I needed. so before writing something off as obsolete (unless your really looking for a legitamite reason to buy a new one) double check on the company's website first. There are a lot of downloads and up grades that are avilable for no cost. Now if I could just program a spell check into the boards messaging system.... back to the old dictionary for me I guess..

    Blue

  25. #25
    Super Member Debra Mc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dar627742
    i just got a call from my service man to tell me the "mother board' hs gone out on my brother pc6000 pacesetter.$400.00 for parts,etc.even tho it's only been used less than 2 yrs,it s still 12 yrs old,so hate to put that much money into it & still have a 12 yr old machine.hERE'S WHERE I NEED YOUR opinion...i can trade it up to a new one,but am sure i'll have to go WAY up.i have a brand new janome2010 that i LOVE for piecing,etc but would love to have a larger throat for quilting.also would like to have an embroidrey machione,but can't affod $1000 or more any suggestions ?i've been leaning toward viking or pfaff ,but don't want to jump into something i'll regret.even refurbwoud be fine .since i have a sewing machine i'm happy with [except for a longer throat] i'm really leaning toward an embroidery/only machine, HELP
    Shouldn't that come under the 25 year warranty.

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