Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Mystery vintage machine, Singer-like, larger throat ?

  1. #1
    Senior Member 1000projects's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Carmel Indiana
    Posts
    458
    Found this fuzzy picture on the Nolting web site under "used" machines. Blue/grey in color, shaped like a vintage Singer but has a larger throat? any ideas?

    I am really lusting after a vintage singer-type machine with 10" or more throat. Maybe a 231 or a 31-15. Has anyone here used those for FMQ? I need a model with a motor mounted on the back (like a 15-91, but with larger throat) My goal is frame-mounted FMQ.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outer Space
    Posts
    9,839
    The machine above has a singer decal on it. It may be a repainted 201. It's easy to find a vintage 201. If that's what this is... If you post a picture in the vintage machine area there are folks who can tell you what this model # is.

  3. #3
    Super Member pumpkinpatchquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    1,374
    I have no idea but what an interesting topic. :) I will be watching to see how this goes for you.

  4. #4
    Senior Member 1000projects's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Carmel Indiana
    Posts
    458
    Looks like the 201 has a 9" throat space. Bobbin is drop-in, so not the best for FMQ. (I have a 15-91, which is a vertical bobbin machine, I am in love with that one!)

    Got that info from an older thread here:
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-112159-1.htm

    Is there any way to move a thread on this board?

  5. #5
    Super Member Fabaddict's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,537
    check the serial number with Singer that should give you some information

  6. #6
    Super Member fabric_fancy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    at my sewing machine
    Posts
    1,975
    thats a 9 inch throat for sure.

    have you looked at the Homesteader machines? its a stretched vintage singer

    http://www.thequiltingsolution.com/homesteader.html

  7. #7
    Senior Member 1000projects's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Carmel Indiana
    Posts
    458
    fabric_fancy ... I am thinking maybe a Voyager 17 from Hinterberg. (stitch regulator is $700 versus $1600) They have refurb machines available right now. :-)

  8. #8
    Super Member fabric_fancy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    at my sewing machine
    Posts
    1,975
    well thats much better, i thought from your post that you really wanted a vintage singer for frame quilting.

  9. #9
    Senior Member 1000projects's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Carmel Indiana
    Posts
    458
    I do really want a vintage singer for frame quilting. Maybe I am nuts! I also want my replacement machine to do a really great job with FMQ, have a compatible stitch regulator, and not break needles and make rats nests like my current %@*! Viking does. So I think I am going to "settle" for a modern machine.

    From the picture I posted above, it seemed like maybe that was a lovely vintage mid-arm machine. The shape is so graceful, it really looks like a much larger throat machine than it is.

  10. #10
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outer Space
    Posts
    9,839
    WOW stretched machines are also vintage singers I believe. Google them and see.

  11. #11
    Super Member fabric_fancy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    at my sewing machine
    Posts
    1,975
    WOW machines are a stretched 201 but they lose the 201 look in the process whereas the homesteader retains that vintage singer look.

    WOW also stretches many of the modern 9 inch throats (juki, janome, brother, etc) the cost is $1,800 and the wait list is 40 people deep and takes about 16-18 months from when you get on the list to when your name is called.

    the final result of a stretched 9 inch is an 18 inch machine - you lose the feed dogs completely and the needle up/down and thread/cutter is moved to the top head position.

  12. #12
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Festus, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    1,552
    I think some of the DIY type quilting machines are actually re-purposed commercial sewing machines like for sewing draperies, sails, tents, etc. The motor is then re-mounted under the machine somehow or sitting on a little pedestal off to one side or even behind it. Tacsew, Consew, Singer, Tajima, Juki, Toyota and I don't know who else but I'm sure there are many more commercial sewing machine manufacturers make long throated, high speed, single or perhaps simple zigzag stitch machines. These machines are expensive when they are brand new/lightly used but you will occasionally stumble across one that has been stored for a while and the seller has no idea how expensive it really was. I think the NuStyle Quilting machines are re-purposed commercial Juki's or Consews.

  13. #13
    Senior Member 1000projects's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Carmel Indiana
    Posts
    458
    I broke 5 needles today on my Vicious Viking (which prompted the need for a new machine, lol) I get so stressed out when the needle breaks for no reason, so frustrating.

    Then i found the 5 part checklist for needle breakage (here on this site!) Turns out my needle at zero is not centered over the single needle stitch plate. I biased the needle to 0.5 and suddenly the machine is cooperating. Also treated the cotton thread with silicone oil and it stopped breaking. I am trying to finish this quilt - a baby quilt so it should be done already.

  14. #14
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outer Space
    Posts
    9,839
    Quote Originally Posted by 1000projects
    I broke 5 needles today on my Vicious Viking (which prompted the need for a new machine, lol) I get so stressed out when the needle breaks for no reason, so frustrating.

    Then i found the 5 part checklist for needle breakage (here on this site!) Turns out my needle at zero is not centered over the single needle stitch plate. I biased the needle to 0.5 and suddenly the machine is cooperating. Also treated the cotton thread with silicone oil and it stopped breaking. I am trying to finish this quilt - a baby quilt so it should be done already.
    You should take it in for service if at zero it's not centered correctly. Glad you temporarily found a fix, but it sounds like it needs some work done on it. Hopefully, it's still under warranty.

  15. #15
    Senior Member 1000projects's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Carmel Indiana
    Posts
    458
    Just had service! It is 3 or so years old. I recently got the single needle stitch plate (and the quilting frame) ... I am doing so much more fmq with vicious Viking now than i was before. I also got a singer 15-91(i am in love!) and am doing all my piecing on that one.

  16. #16
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outer Space
    Posts
    9,839
    Then you should take it back in and tell them it's misaligned.

  17. #17
    Super Member Mitch's mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    1,429
    The machine in the picture is a 31-15. They have mounted a motor behind it; if you look closely you can see the motor pulley. They have changed out the hand wheel, but I can't tell exactly what it is they have put in its place. The tension mechanism is new, probably a Consew tensioner. The 31-15 and one of the Consew machines (can't recall the model right now, tired) can use interchangeable parts. When I need something for my 31-15 I'll look at Consew parts - sometimes they are cheaper and definitely easier to find.
    The throat on the 31-15 is 10 inches. They didn't gain much by doing this conversion other than A LOT of weight!

  18. #18
    Super Member kiffie2413's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    3,811
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by 1000projects
    I do really want a vintage singer for frame quilting. Maybe I am nuts! I also want my replacement machine to do a really great job with FMQ, have a compatible stitch regulator, and not break needles and make rats nests like my current %@*! Viking does. So I think I am going to "settle" for a modern machine.

    From the picture I posted above, it seemed like maybe that was a lovely vintage mid-arm machine. The shape is so graceful, it really looks like a much larger throat machine than it is.
    I don't think you are nuts!... From what I am seeing, there are several people who use a vintage machine for their quilting...I actually inherited my great-grandma's vintage singer, it is in the original treadle cabinet, although "Ma" at some point had an electric motor added to it. I have never used it, only have it out for display, and actually admitted on here I never thought about using it to quilt... :oops: It never dawned on me until I started researching about it, and happened upon a whole group of people who use their vintage machines for just that purpose...
    Good luck to you,
    Kif

  19. #19
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Mars
    Posts
    2,038
    I think it's a 31-15, too. Or maybe a 31-20, which is the same machine only with the M bobbin, rather than the class 15 bobbin.

    I recently had a box made for my treadled 31-15, and had a support put on the box for a modern domestic motor.

    I wanted it arranged like this so that I can set it in the middle of a work table and have room on both sides for the pipes to support the Flynn frame, which I have never even taken out of the box. I've been so busy that I haven't had time to play with it since I had the box made, but I'll get around to it one of these days.

    If it works out, I want to try to figure out how to convert it to the M bobbin. :)

    This is a really common industrial machine - all of the replacement parts are easily available online and the Juki hopping foot for high shank machines works just fine on it.

  20. #20
    Super Member Mitch's mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    1,429
    Thanks for the heads up on the Juki hopping foot! Off to go shopping :)!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.