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Thread: New serger - now what?

  1. #1
    Super Member Ruby the Quilter's Avatar
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    New serger - now what?

    I have a Juki MO1000 serger - it was sort of a impulse buy, now what do I do with it? Any recommendations for some books that have projects made on the serger? I don't make clothes but this might get me back to that. Thanks for any ideas for me.
    Quilting in the Desert

  2. #2
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    Makes some pretty napkins for Christmas presents. I think Bernina had a serger quilt video?

  3. #3
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    You did not say if you had ever used a serger. Here are a few books I have, you might want to check them out of the library first.
    Singer Sewing with an overlock
    Serger Secrets by Rodale Press
    The Ultimate Serger Answer Guide
    Creative Serging
    and a few others I've put away just so I can not find them again. Check out the serger books co-authered by Nancy Zieman, usually have discs with them and they're more up to date. You might want to check back with the person who sold you the serger because the bells and whistles on them are constantly being updated. My old standby is just a basic work-horse. Your's probably threads itself and makes coffee too.

    Some vo-tech schools offer classes, as do the shops that sell the machines. Didn't you get classes with the purchase? They are great for making lingerie for men and women.

  4. #4
    Member sophiebernina's Avatar
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    There are some serger classes at Craftsy that might be useful.

  5. #5
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    Nancy Zieman has several PBS shows on serging. Some beautiful projects.

  6. #6
    Super Member Sandygirl's Avatar
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    I have serged edges of quick tablerunners and pot holders vs. binding them. Quick.mesp if making multiples. Finish off those microwave bowls. Crafters?
    Sandy
    Sandygirl

    Janome 9900 / Janome 9700 / Janome 3160 QVC/ Janome 1100D serger, Juki 2020 Mini
    Singer Centennial model (inherited from my late, fav aunt!)

  7. #7
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sahansen44 View Post
    Nancy Zieman has several PBS shows on serging. Some beautiful projects.
    nancy's videos are all free to watch on her website. I have learned a tremendous amount re: sewing and quilting from her.
    Alyce

  8. #8
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    I would test it with some strips. I never liked the bulk that my old serger made. It is stuck in a box in the closet.
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  9. #9
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    Love a serger for things like totebags, home dec items. Have not used it for piecing, just not sure about the amount of thread it would put into a quilt. I do make some quickie baby blankets, put two squares of flannel RST, serger around it leaving an opening for turning. I stitch on my DSM about 1" from edge all the way around. very washable (I prewash flannel) and no one is worried about ruining a "good" quilt.

  10. #10
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    If you make pillow cases, a serger is ideal. When I was making them with my DSM, I would do French seams to hide the raw edges. With a serger, they are automatically hidden.

    To make quick polar fleece throws, you can take one or two layers and serge all the way around. The serger trims off the selvages at the same time it is sewing and I use contrasting threads for a decorative touch.

    I have read, though I haven't tried, serging the edges of a quilt before putting on the binding.

  11. #11
    Power Poster Annaquilts's Avatar
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    I think some people make quilts on it. Logcabin? I am not sure but I have often wanted a serger but it has been for making clothes. Enjoy! I am sure you will find lots of fun stuff to make on it.
    Anna Quilts

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    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    I saw a quilt made by serging tubes and then weaving them.
    I just finished a bunch of fabric napkins. even made sets as a wedding/bridal gift.
    put off till tomorrow what you can do today, and if you procrastinate long enough, you may never have to do it.

  13. #13
    Super Member Girlfriend's Avatar
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    I love to make my own washcloths to take my make up off with. I buy all cotton terry cloth at Joann's and pretty serger thread, and sew them with rounded corners, and smaller than what you buy in the store. I just find the washcloths bought in stores are too thick and too big for the job. I am also asked by my family to make theirs, and it's fun to give them away. Also make baby washcloths the same way, only smaller yet, about 8" to 9". New mothers can never have enough baby washcloths. They love them.
    Creative clutter is better than idle neatness.

  14. #14
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    Make pillow cases! froggyinTexas

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    Last year I bought a new serger and so far I've made(100% on the serger) a lap quilt, a jacket, an heirloom nightgown, the grandma's fan quilt block, a purse for my granddaughter, a cover for my heating pad and matching pillow cover, with decrotive top stitching, a tote bag, a log cabin quilt made with fleece, a jacket made with fleece, and this month I'm doing a quilt. Nancy Z has a book on making quilts with sergers, you can do table runners, I made large NFL fleece throws for all of my grown kids, serging sure is faster. There are lots of things. go to sites like Brother, etc and see what projects they have for sergers. There are also lots of you tube, etc on line as well.
    Judy

  16. #16
    Senior Member GammaLou's Avatar
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    Smile

    I make pajama pants for my children and grandsons. They love getting them and they work up extremely fast on my serger. It is also great for repairs and hemming.

    I have a friend who does her quilts on her serger, so I guess there are just lots and lots of uses. You'll have to find out what works best for your sewing.

    Have fun!!

  17. #17
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    the nice thing about doing a quilt on the serger, you never run out of bobbin thread because there is none. The amount of thread wouldn't be that much, use the stitch that uses 2 threads, the same as a machine. The one quilt I did was a quilt as you go, it was great. the other great thing is you can use a larger variety of fabric. Like the log cabin out of fleece I'm doing, the fabric doesn't stretch. I'm close to being done and I'll try to post pictures. Plus with using the serger on this one, I have the option of not putting a backing on it because the edges are sealed.
    Judy

  18. #18
    mac
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    I am glad you asked your question about projects. I just bought a Brother and I haven't even taken it out of the box yet. I planned on taking a class for beginners next month. I am a little intimidated with it so far, hence not taking it out of the box. I know it won't bite. LOL

  19. #19
    Super Member Honchey's Avatar
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    serging the edges of a quilt top works out fine..I've also pieced backings using the serger and not one bit of a problem with the LAQ..

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    One of the most important piece of advice I can give you is: Mark the factory settings on your knobs with a permanent marker or write them down on a piece of masking tape and tape them to the inside of your drop-down front. If you get the tension all screwed up, you will know where to reset it. When I bought my first one many years ago, the sales lady told me this and it saved my behind many a time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mac View Post
    I am glad you asked your question about projects. I just bought a Brother and I haven't even taken it out of the box yet. I planned on taking a class for beginners next month. I am a little intimidated with it so far, hence not taking it out of the box. I know it won't bite. LOL
    Not sure which one you got. Last year I got the Ovation, absolutely love it, its so easy to use and the guide that comes with it to show how to thread and the settings for different stitches is great. I've already posted on here alot of the projects I'm made but its so easy
    Judy

  22. #22
    mac
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    Quote Originally Posted by DACO48 View Post
    One of the most important piece of advice I can give you is: Mark the factory settings on your knobs with a permanent marker or write them down on a piece of masking tape and tape them to the inside of your drop-down front. If you get the tension all screwed up, you will know where to reset it. When I bought my first one many years ago, the sales lady told me this and it saved my behind many a time.
    That is excellent advice. Thank you for sharing it.

  23. #23
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    DACO48, thank you for that extremely helpful hint! I wish that I had thought to do that when I got my Babylock serger! My husband recently bought me a top of the line Janome Covertitch Pro 1000 CPX. I haven't even fired it up yet, but I will take your advice to mark the factory settings before I begin to use it. I am very appreciative that you posted this!

    One of the first things that I made with my serger was an ironing board cover. The second thing that I made was a Genie Halloween costume for my daughter. It sews chiffon beautifully. I have always meant to sew lingerie and slips with it, but haven't purchased the nylon tricot yet. I'm a procrastinator {Sigh}. But I have heard that a serger is great for making half slips, and that is an easy project. A lot of people also like it for sewing fleece. If you have a beading/piping foot, you can add a special touch to your pillows and embellish dresses and scarves and such. You could make a table cloth, napkins, placemats, a cover for your serger, a toaster cover, pillowcases, face clothes, beautiful scarves. A serged seam prevents the edges of fabric from fraying, so don't forget to use it for that. I have seen a project where someone took facecloths and serged them together to make a baby blanket. And on YouTube, I saw a similar project for making a very nice bathmat.

    Palmer and Pletsch has some very helpful dvds. You can get them on Amazon. They are outdated, but the information is priceless. I think you'll find them very helpful. Also, if you have a Roku--download the PBS app and do a search for Sewing, and you will see Sewing with Nancy. There are almost 100 videos on sewing, and some of them are about using your serger. But just know that she uses a Babylock serger to demonstrate techniques.

    Make sure to use good quality thread. Poor quality thread has a tendency to shed lint. And speaking of lint, clean your serger more frequently than you do your sewing machine. Be careful not to sew over pins, or you will ruin your blades. If you misplace your nets for your cone thread, use knee high nylons by cutting them into tubes. When you are sewing with monofilament, taming your thread cones with those nets are critical.

    I hope you enjoy your new serger. Have fun! Sharon

  24. #24
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    Also, it is supposed to be excellent for making swimsuits.

  25. #25
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    Napkins, tote bags, and pillowcases have all been mentioned. And there is nothing better for sewing knits than a serger! I loved making tshirts and sweatshirts for my kids with my serger. I made fleece socks one year using a flat lock stitch. Those were a hit!

    As for using it in quilting, I have recently started serging the edge of my quilts prior to binding them. Gives me a nice solid edge. The serger is really for home dec and garments though.

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