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Thread: Non-quilters do not understand

  1. #51
    Member bonnielass's Avatar
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    I have known people who spent thousands for golfing, fishing, hunting, tennis and all manner of other sports (ie. hobbies), I know how much motorcycles cost. The only reason I quilt is I have to watch my pennies, so I save everything I can.

  2. #52
    Senior Member janegb's Avatar
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    Some people collect Teacups, I collect fabric and sewing machines! LOL

  3. #53
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    Yes, I am a quilter, and I have fabric.. I don't think I have an excessive amount.. I have mostly scraps, and very little yardage.. I like to use scraps, and don't use patterns.. That's just my personal preference.. I also don't like to waste...

    I went to a tag sale at a house of a quilter.. The woman passed away seven years ago at the age of 54.. The husband has a girlfriend, and they were moving.. What was at the sale scared the crap out of me.. She had a studio in on the upper floor.. One area was floor to ceiling shelves with fabric yardage folded.. The other room was filled with boxes of fat quarters, and other fabrics.. She had templates, and duplicate templates, multiple rulers, and scissor.. The more I thought of it.. There was no way this woman could possibly have used all of the stuff in there, even if she didn't pass away early.. My question is. When does it change from need based to hoarding?

  4. #54
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
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    Our house is funny. I had to move in with my brother and we both understand collecting STUFF.. His is mostly cars and motorcycles. and computer things. Me its fabric and antique furniture. I have very very little furniture now that I only have one room , my bedroom . I have a second room that is my sewing room with the computer in it. But when his step daughter moved in all she sees is clutter. She is the type that has to have the kitchen towels folded a certain way. No hobbies either. I really don't understand someone like that. LOL She sleeps and watches tv all day. to me that is sooo boring. While I can't sew as much as I would like, I do read when I can't do anything else. And I think about what I am going to make. :-)

  5. #55
    Junior Member LadyCougar's Avatar
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    It's not just non-quilters, I think it's non- sewers who do not understand our love of fabric.
    LadyCougar

    "There's always time to quilt"

  6. #56
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    OK. Thanks for the validation! I love my fabric stash. I am always so pleased with myself when I can go to my basement, pull together some fabric and make a quilt from what I have. I have made quilts for birthday gifts, graduation, weddings, babies. I remember making a wall-hanging for a wedding gift. I loved this wall-hanging, the way it turned out, the hand embroidered quote, everything. My X-husband said, "we can't just give them that." Well, I can be sure the wall-hanging lasted longer than that $50 check. (or the wedding, for that matter!) Maybe we just make it look to easy.

    As for scraps, my favorite (for now) quilt is a crazy, mile-a-minute quilt I made that has a scrap of just about every quilt I've ever made. I love looking at the bits and pieces and remembering which quilt project they came from.

  7. #57
    Junior Member psthreads's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingweb View Post
    OK. Thanks for the validation! I love my fabric stash. I am always so pleased with myself when I can go to my basement, pull together some fabric and make a quilt from what I have. I have made quilts for birthday gifts, graduation, weddings, babies. I remember making a wall-hanging for a wedding gift. I loved this wall-hanging, the way it turned out, the hand embroidered quote, everything. My X-husband said, "we can't just give them that." Well, I can be sure the wall-hanging lasted longer than that $50 check. (or the wedding, for that matter!) Maybe we just make it look to easy.

    As for scraps, my favorite (for now) quilt is a crazy, mile-a-minute quilt I made that has a scrap of just about every quilt I've ever made. I love looking at the bits and pieces and remembering which quilt project they came from.
    Ok where can I find a mile-a-minute quilt pattern?

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl View Post
    it's not just non-quilters --- there are quilters too who do not save anything beyond what their current project requires.
    i have a friend who has been creating beautiful quilts for 30 years---she uses exactly what her pattern requires & (used to) toss anything left over---i about had a heart attack when she first told me this---& told me----'oh- don't become one of THOSE string savers!'....it took me a couple years but i did finally convince her to let me have the contents of her (waste basket) before bagging it to go to the landfill---she just shakes her head & gives it up---sometimes there is 1/2 a yard or more pieces in there---i know she is not alone- lots of people use what is required then get rid of what ever was left over- regardless of amount- and then there are those of us who buy extra on purpose & keep a stash and save every scrap--- not every quilter understands any more than a non-quilter understands.
    Do these "tossers" also throw away half used spools of thread, or an unfinished skein of yarn? If so, I don't think they could have grown up with parents who went through the Depression. Anyone who lived through that bad time tended to become "keepers"! My philosophy, I suppose, is that I cannot abide waste and if it's usable, then keep it. But I'm not a hoarder. I don't "save" garbage and trash!

  9. #59
    Senior Member pinkcastle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenheron View Post
    I think that every time we purchase fabric we are also purchasing the dream quilt we will make with it.
    I agree. I don't have a huge stash since I've only been quilting for a few years, but I love looking at it. To me it represents possibilities. It can also be an interesting challenge to think of ways to use it. The fabrics are what I think of as my artist's palette. For those who don't get it, oh well! Some people have hobbies that I don't understand so it works both ways.

  10. #60
    Senior Member Rubesgirl's Avatar
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    Thanks for validating those of us who were sewers before becoming quilters. I still have fabrics I bought many many years ago, stored in bins from my move in 1984. They have traveled with me from home to home over nearly 30 years and I still use some pieces now and then. I am not a hoarder and am very organized, my DH says I'm too neat. I just can't part with some of the stuff I've had for so long. Now that I'm making quilts, I'm finding uses for fabrics I thought I'd never use. Now, if I could only figure how to incorporate all the stained glass I still have .....
    Wendy in FL

    If I had a dollar for every time I got distracted I wish I had some ice cream.

  11. #61
    Super Member Glenda m's Avatar
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    I just loathed looking at the scraps I placed in the trash can when I was making clothing for the DH and all 8 children. But I wasn't 'into' quilting way back then. Now all the rug rats have grown and left home. I still make the DH shirts, because he is so picky about them. Anyway, I now take those scraps from the shirts and left over quilting and cut them into 1" squares. They will be a postage stamp quilt some day. (Hopefully)
    You can get older, but you never have to grow up! Tomorrow's just a future yesterday!-Greg Fergerson

  12. #62
    Super Member Lucy90's Avatar
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    A couple of my quilter friends have told our DH if anything happens to us to call our two remaining friends and let them come over to get the fabric and tools. I don't want it to get thrown out. My husband passed away a couple of years ago so now I told my children as they don't sew!!

  13. #63
    Super Member Latrinka's Avatar
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    Nope, they don't, and they never will!
    If a woman's work is never done....why start?

  14. #64
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    When I was in high school my Home Ec teacher told us to save all of our scraps. She never told us what to do with them. That was in the 60's.
    Marilyn

  15. #65
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    While i was away working, i ordered fabrics from several online sites plus bought fabric in Honolulu. i have carefully washed all 40 yards or so and it is neatly stacked on a chair in the living room to go in sewing room. I love that my husband walked by it with nary a word even though the wire basket storage system in my sewing room is clearly overloaded. my daughter informed me recently that she didn't think there would be very much unclaimed sewing/quilting leftovers when i pass to donate to the guild for charity quilts. I picked up a Grace floor quilting stand from a daughter of a quilter this week. Along with the machine she gave me a laundry bag full of "remmants" she thought weren't good enough to keep or sell of her mother's quilting fabrics. i've noticed some very nice pieces are in there.

  16. #66
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    I also save every scrap from stuff i've made. When i really got into quilting back in '97/98 i still had
    scraps from things i made my youngest daughter when she was 3 or 4 y.o....the first quilt i made that was a little more then just big blocks was called confetti toss.....made lots of them.
    Made one for a g-niece and the mother said she enjoyed looking at all the different fabrics. That one included fabrics from my daughters clothes.......i love scrap quilting.......i also hear from people about omg you'll never use all that fabric.....true but it's there when i want to look for different stuff....had to do a little rearranging in the garage last night and discovered a couple bags of scraps i hadn't seen for a while.....have a nice day.......
    dsews2

  17. #67
    Senior Member Noiseynana's Avatar
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    When my MIL passed away last year, the kids went thru her things (she is a quilter). My hubby and his brother went thru her stash ( all of about 10 yds of fabric) . My BIL said " can you believe all this material ?" My hubby said to him " This is nothing , you should see what all Eileene has ." hehehe So far I have 2 large long dressers an antique cabinet and I don't know how many totes and shelves. hehehehe
    Stitching is Meditation in Motion

  18. #68
    Super Member Crafty1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn View Post
    I always hear "Why do you need all this fabric? What are you going to do with it? You'll never be able to use all of it" This all from people who don't financially support me and act like it is their money I'm using to buy it!
    Ditto for me! My mom was here last month visiting and she shook her head and said, "that's enough now, stop buying all this stuff" blah blah blah. I just laughed and showed her a quilt I'm making for her and she loves it! Then she sort of understands but still shakes her head, LOL

  19. #69
    Junior Member Raine's Avatar
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    Hear, Hear! Isn't wonderful to make something out of nothing.
    Believe, it can be done!

  20. #70
    Super Member QandE2010's Avatar
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    Not only do non-quilters not get it, they also have no concept of the time and $$ it takes to create. I have stopped trying to educate them.
    Alma
    Nami to 6

  21. #71
    pal
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    I keep my "other than100% cotton" fabrics in seperate plastic containers. My Friend laughed her head off when she read "Special Fabric for Something Special" on a container. Every quilter knows what that is. When I find that pattern I'll be ready!
    PACE - Positive Attitude Changes Everything

    "All things are literally better, lovlier, and more beloved for the imperfections that reflect the human effort that went into their making."

  22. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingweb View Post
    OK. My X-husband said, "we can't just give them that." Well, I can be sure the wall-hanging lasted longer than that $50 check. (or the wedding, for that matter!) Maybe we just make it look to easy.

    .
    I think that we tend to get handmade art/handmade gifts confused with the crafts that we made in grammer school for our moms and dads. That's why we feel chintzy when we give something that we have made. In truth, it's a much more expensive gift than the check or the silver bowl - it cost TIME.

  23. #73
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    i have daughters who "get" it. they are artists, and budding seamstresses. the rest of the world? not so much. we have a friend whose mother has collected fabric for years. he has gotten me to promise that i'll help clean out her house when she passes. she has literally filled up her house (three bedrooms plus) with fabric. there are hundreds of folds, bolts, piles, etc. but you know what? it has kept her busy and active, well into her 80s, now. she still sews, quilts, makes curtains, drapes, etc. some folks collect little things--some collect big things. quilters collect potential, i believe. we collect what might be. we collect dreams made of the fabric we find, we collect against the day we will have enough time to do as we please with all that beauty. my fabric stash is nothing compared to our friend's mom's--but my dreams are younger than hers. (and taking care of her stash may cure my need for mine, eventually!)
    "life is a banquet, and most poor fools are out there, starving to death!"--"auntie mame"

  24. #74
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    LOL! I collected fabric for all of the many years that I worked--anticipating my retirement years when I would quilt all day. Most days I don't quilt all day, but I know I have enough fabric to keep me going for the rest of my life If I decide I do want to quilt all day. That, of course, doesn't keep me from getting more fabric. Who knows, I might live to be 250 or so!!!!

  25. #75
    Super Member DebbE's Avatar
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    Forgive those who make comments like that -- they have no idea. Those scraps that would have been thrown away will make beautiful quilts for people who cherish them as they cuddle up in them. When I'm having a bad day I just walk into my quilt room and I feel so much better. I got no less than 5 'thank you's' from someone I gave my last quilt to...she'd had surgery, and several of these 'thank you's' arrived when I was having a lousy day, and when she was getting some real comfort from the quilt during a rough recovery. The quilts aren't award winners by any means, but I feel good making them, and those who receive them feel good receiving them -- win, win! I'm presently cutting up some of the smallish pieces into preset sizes for bins (thank you, Bonnie Hunter!). So when I'm ready to make the next quilts, I'll just have to start sewing.

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