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Thread: Old quilt repairs

  1. #1
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    I recently purchased a vintage quilt. The binding is very tattered. The quilt it self is in excellent condition. What is the best way to repair this quilt? Or should I just leave it as is since I will not use it for anything but display?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Hosta's Avatar
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    when i repaired a quilt like this I just sewed with tiny stitches the binding back together but it wasn't very tattered. their are many websites on the web telling about how to repair old quilts if you just type in repairing vintage quilts. But I am sure there is someone here that can tell you as much as they can.

  3. #3
    Super Member MaryStoaks's Avatar
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    I would just sew a new binding over the tattered one.

  4. #4
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    Does repairing an old quilt devalue it?

  5. #5
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    how old is the quilt? What period of time.
    Yes, repairs to devalue. It then becomes whatever is the newest put in.
    If just the binding, you can get authentic fabric.
    I would remove the existing binding and do a new one.

  6. #6
    Super Member maine ladybug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaryStoaks
    I would just sew a new binding over the tattered one.
    I think this would be my solution too. That way you will still have the whole quilt under the new binding.

  7. #7
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    you can easily remove the binding and replace it with a new binding- or you can just make a new binding and put it over the raggedy one- your choice- personally i remove old ratty bindings and replace them with new ones- but that's just how i do it.

  8. #8
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    I don't know how old this is. I know I don't remember seeing these fabrics and I am old so it has to be older than I am. The frayed edges are on the top and bottom and not the sides. My guess is that it is from the wear and tear of being used.

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    Closer look
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    fraying
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  9. #9
    Super Member buddy'smom's Avatar
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    A new binding won't hurt, it's a stunning quilt.
    The gal who owns a lqs here in town had repaired a quilt for a gal and when I heard she was getting 35.00 an hour I was blowen away. Not that it's not worth it but this was being repaired because her bird destroyed it and he would get it back aftere the repairs.

  10. #10
    Super Member isnthatodd's Avatar
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    I would delicately tie down the frayed strings and leave it as it is. You can always fold it so that the frayed edges don't show.

  11. #11
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    What type of binding was used on the quilt?

    Straight or bias cut?

    Single fold or double fold?

    Just asking because I've been wondering how the various binding survive use and time.

  12. #12
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    It's a nice quilt and will look very nice on display. Repairing a quilt can devalue an antique but unless you plan to bring it to the Antique Road Show or insure it, I wouldn't worry about it. I would hand sew a new cotton white binding over the existing frayed binding. That way you will prevent any further damage (vaccuum catching a raw edge). With antique repairs, I think they hand sew bridal tulle? over frayed spots for perservation.

  13. #13
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    The binding looks like it is straight grain, single fold. Sewn from the back turned and top stitched on front by machine.
    Looks like tiny stitches, about 15 per inch, too tiny for me to count.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by one&only
    The binding looks like it is straight grain, single fold. Sewn from the back turned and top stitched on front by machine.
    Looks like tiny stitches, about 15 per inch, too tiny for me to count.
    Thank you.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    Quote Originally Posted by one&only
    The binding looks like it is straight grain, single fold. Sewn from the back turned and top stitched on front by machine.
    Looks like tiny stitches, about 15 per inch, too tiny for me to count.
    Thank you.
    Your Welcome, and THANK YOU everyone for your responses, I appreciate all the replies.

  16. #16
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
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    I would apply a new binding over the old...find some vintage fabric that is similar to the original. Bindings take the most wear of any other part of a quilt..which is why I use a double folded binding on my quilts

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