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Thread: our modern quilting tools

  1. #26
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    We made a yoyo quilt for our guild President and used an old scratched CD and rotary cutter to
    cut the circles....then they were the same size. I cut at least 4-6 at a time; great tool.

  2. #27
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrap41 View Post
    We made a yoyo quilt for our guild President and used an old scratched CD and rotary cutter to
    cut the circles....then they were the same size. I cut at least 4-6 at a time; great tool.
    And now they have the Clover Yo-Yo Maker which I have and love. I would never make a yo-yo the old fashioned way unless it was just one or two for a flower to be appliqued.
    TwandasMom

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by vondae View Post
    What is fluff & stuff?
    Instead of rolling the quilt sandwich into a sausage (which gets really unwielding) the quilt is "fluffed and stuffed" into the machine throat. Then the part to be quiltet is patted down so you only have to deal with the small space directly under and around the needle. It makes the quilt easier to handle. Of course, the larger the quilt the more fluffing and stuffing you have to do.

    We now use hair clips to hold the binding down. They may be called quilt clips but by golly, they sure look like hair clips to me. Small bottle brushes or other kitchen brushes are used to clean the machine.

  4. #29
    Super Member roguequilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarrieC View Post
    And I remember when Rotary stuff hit the market. I was skeptical - but took a class and fell in love with them. I used them for home decor before quilting.
    my first & only learning how to quilt class was fr shop owner friend who had taken a rotary cutting class fr judy hopkins, was hooked & started giving classes, using the judy hopkins book "its ok you can sit on my quilt" book. great book, class, & that rotary cutter & rulers were soon at work measuring and cutting wall paper, made a perfect "square" measure to check the height of a son taller than me by the time he was 12, & in current home the rotary rulers for laying out lines to paint accent strip on ceiling. rotary cutters and accessories best inventions ever!
    the rogue quilter - in from wandering in the sun and snow with camera in hand.

  5. #30
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
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    Curious, so I looked it up:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXyot_s7Bhc
    Couldn't find many places to buy one, but saw on eBay, approx. $10 with shipping. I think I'll use my fingers to remove threads for now.

    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    I don't live in an old fashioned world and don't want to. I love new quilting tools. Have you seen the new seam ripper? It's called the Seam Fix seam ripper. It's getting rave reviews from quilters.
    :-)
    CAS

  6. #31
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    Why are so many so negative about anyone buying new quilting tools? I buy new quilting tools. It may seem foolish, silly or wasteful to others that I spend $ on an item that is in their opinion unnecessary or say it's over priced for what it is. Many quilters have spendable income to spend and don't have to justify the cost vs. need. I use to give new product demos for my guild. I quit because of the negativity from many of the older members who never tried it but deemed the product silly or expensive. They sucked the simple joy out of every demo for me and others.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by CAS49OR View Post
    Curious, so I looked it up:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXyot_s7Bhc
    Couldn't find many places to buy one, but saw on eBay, approx. $10 with shipping. I think I'll use my fingers to remove threads for now.
    Nothing outstanding about the seam ripper itself, right? The thread remover looks like the end of a tension rod for curtains, don't you think?
    Last edited by AshleyR; 06-06-2012 at 03:09 PM.

  8. #33
    Senior Member stillclock's Avatar
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    hm. it's like the wedding industry i guess. if you brand something for weddings, you can charge a lot more for it than you could otherwise. i think this happens with quilting too. call it a tool for quilting and you have a market that will spend more money for something than it would otherwise.

    our national fabric store, fabricland, has started to carry a lot more stuff for quilting. they had the fons and porter mechanical marking pen. is there something really different about this mechanical pencil that would justify it costing $18? the local office supply store had a range of mechanical pencils from $2-$12. so i could buy the f&p leads for $8 and still come out a few dollars ahead. i use #2 leads so i skipped the whole thing, but the point remains.

    there are lots and lots of notions that are very useful and no one is to say how another should spend their own money. quilting changes all the time, and some of the quilts we see just wouldn't be possible without some of the new technologies. that's not where my sense of derision came from.

    but i do feel that there is a certain amount of advantage being taken, and that maybe if we did stop and think for a minute about what we need and what we want and leave aside whether or not we can afford it (and saying i can afford it as a reason to buy it you know?) we'd probably buy a whole lot less generally.

    but this is probably more political than warranted here at qb, so i say hey man, if you want to spend $12 on precut little rubber squares made for quilters, the peoples republic of china thanks you for supporting their manufacturing sector.

    aileen

  9. #34
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
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    I thought it looked kind of like an eraser, I'm guessing it is made of something that grabs the threads. I would love to have it because my fingernails are like cellophane so I use a tweezer to grab the threads. I couldn't find the place that actually sells it but there are many on YouTube who love it!

    I really enjoy buying any tool that makes quilting more fun. Last Friday I found a mini iron at Target for $9.99 (plus my 5% discount). It is made by Sunbeam, and the steam lasted a surprisingly long time! The similar irons I saw on Amazon and eBay were $25. I've been using it and it works great. The thread was about that Clover mini-iron where I heard about them. I got that for Christmas but didn't like burning myself so I returned it.

    My hubby encourages me to buy tools. He is an auto mechanic and always "has" to have a new tool, I'll never catch up to him, lol!

    Quote Originally Posted by AshleyR View Post
    Nothing outstanding about the seam ripper itself, right? The thread remover looks like the end of a tension rod for curtains, don't you think?
    Last edited by CAS49OR; 06-06-2012 at 05:02 PM. Reason: Left out some info
    :-)
    CAS

  10. #35
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    I haven't had much luck with bicycle clips. Unless your quilt is absolutely huge, they keep falling off. No matter how much I smush them, they just won't fit for me.

  11. #36
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
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    I haven't had any luck with clips. I have very little throat space so I find it easier just shoving the bulk of the quilt through. I do not think I'll make a full size quilt again unless I can send it out after piecing.
    :-)
    CAS

  12. #37
    Super Member JNCT14's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CAS49OR View Post
    I haven't had any luck with clips. I have very little throat space so I find it easier just shoving the bulk of the quilt through. I do not think I'll make a full size quilt again unless I can send it out after piecing.
    Take a look at the method of dividing your big quilts into 3 sections - you cut your batting into thirds, then insert the middle batt panel nto the quilt and quilt as desired. Then add the second panel on the side and quilt again, then add the third. There is a tute on it somewhere. Its a great method for handling big quilts without bulk and works well on machines with small harps.

  13. #38
    Super Member JNCT14's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarrieC View Post
    Quilting has come a long way in a few years. Thank goodness! I guess I look at quilting and it's tools alot like other things in my house. 45 years ago my Dad's wood shop was VERY different from today's wood shop. He could still work the old tools as well as the new ones and I too pride myself in being able to quilt the "old" ways and the new ways. I find myself, like my Dad did, combining the two "eras" and selecting what works best for me.

    However I have to share that my Hubby has snitched 2 of my quilting rulers to use for his projects - not to mention I've snitched lets see, aluminum washers (curtain weights), various zip ties (works great for turning tubes) etc.

    And I remember when Rotary stuff hit the market. I was skeptical - but took a class and fell in love with them. I used them for home decor before quilting.
    Carries how do you you use zip ties for tube turning? i do a lot of applique and could use an easier method than a saftey pin!!!!

  14. #39
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    All the talk about all the "official" quilting tools, and the "re-assigned" tools, made me think of this thread. You might get some ideas ... and perhaps you have some more to add!

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/main-f1...g-t152963.html

    About the binding clips vs. hair clips .... same ones yes, and much cheaper if you just buy them at the $ $tore. And you can find some pretty fun colours too, instead of the boring dull silver ones sold in quilters supplies.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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  15. #40
    Super Member katesnanna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paula H View Post
    I originally used bicycle clamps for FMQ but then discovered the resulting roll made it much more difficult to maneuver on my regular sewing machine. I now use the "fluff and stuff" method and it's much easier. Just finished a queen size on my regular machine.
    Fluff & Stuff works for me. As you say it's much easier.

  16. #41
    Senior Member gmcsewer's Avatar
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    One of the best things I have for picking up thread, ( and some always gets on the carpet) is a roller that has a sticky roller and a long handle . You roll it around and pick up everything and then rinse it off with water. I think Dollar Tree has them for sale here.

  17. #42
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stillclock View Post
    if you want to spend $12 on precut little rubber squares made for quilters, the peoples republic of china thanks you for supporting their manufacturing sector.

    aileen
    I have the pre cut little rubber square. I bought it at a quilt show after trying one out. It is not just a little rubber square you can cut from another item and real rubber is expensive. The vendor had several other types of 'grabbers' cut from store items to compare. It takes much less effort to use this square as it grips perfectly, it doesn't leave mark or bend my expensive hand sewing needles like a pair of pliers do. I would buy one again if if lost this one. And it's not made in China. My $12 is being appreciated right here in the US. (maybe that's why it is expensive)

  18. #43
    Senior Member Marilyn Philips's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paula H View Post
    I originally used bicycle clamps for FMQ but then discovered the resulting roll made it much more difficult to maneuver on my regular sewing machine. I now use the "fluff and stuff" method and it's much easier. Just finished a queen size on my regular machine.
    Has anyone every tried using salt and/or pepper shakers to keep thread under control while keeping several spools active on a hand project. It works like a charm but you need to do the following:

    1. Select containers that will FIT the thread spool and has a strong screwon top Don't spend a lot on expensive containers, go to the dollar store or check out your local grocery store.

    2. Put a small square of adhesive backed velcro on each container to keep thread from dropping back into container when not in use.

    I have found that some containers will not only hold the spool, but the snap on bobbin as well.
    Millie

  19. #44
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
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    Thank you for telling me, I'll look into it.

    Quote Originally Posted by JNCT14 View Post
    Take a look at the method of dividing your big quilts into 3 sections - you cut your batting into thirds, then insert the middle batt panel nto the quilt and quilt as desired. Then add the second panel on the side and quilt again, then add the third. There is a tute on it somewhere. Its a great method for handling big quilts without bulk and works well on machines with small harps.
    :-)
    CAS

  20. #45
    Senior Member Ccorazone's Avatar
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    I have all sorts of rulers and templates and seldom do I find a quilt pattern I like to use them with.

    "Small deeds done are better than great deeds planned"
    Peter Marshall

    "Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that
    take our breath away". - Hilary Cooper
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/2HartsCreations?ref=si_shop

  21. #46
    Super Member Marysewfun's Avatar
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    Mad Quilter - I had also heard somewhere recently that the "fluff & stuff" helps the quilt to lie more naturally by the needle where you are sewing without stress being applied to one or the other of the fabrics by rolling it.

    And the quilt clips? Yup, I laughed my socks off when I first saw those being sold as a quilting specialty item - I used to use them in my hair - as well as "hem clips" in sewing, and have even used bobby pins to hold hems for stitching or to quickly hold two seams together when I don't want pin holes in my fabric.

    While the new toys are fun - and I have some sitting right here beside me - I sometimes like to make it a mental game to see what could be substituted and get the same results with less cost. It's fun! :-) I read on this board all the things people have gotten from hardware stores - and I have a new love for hardware stores.

    Marysewfun
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    Have a great day!

  22. #47
    Senior Member ShabbyTabby's Avatar
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    When I made my very first quilt (back in the 80's) I used sandpaper under all my fabrics I was marking for cutting as the sandpaper kept the fabric from moving. I also cut little strips (1" long and aboout 1/4" wide) and glue to the bottom of my long rulers. It keeps them from moving when I rotary cut and making them so small they don't hide the lines on the rulers.
    Families are like old quilts....although they tend to unravel at times...each can be stitched back together with love.

  23. #48
    Senior Member PghPat's Avatar
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    Bodkin for applique turning

    Quote Originally Posted by JNCT14 View Post
    Carries how do you you use zip ties for tube turning? i do a lot of applique and could use an easier method than a saftey pin!!!!
    JNCT......have you ever tried using a bodkin for turning your applique...once you do you can't be without. Eleanor Burns explains how to use it with a straw in her "Applique In A Day". With a coupon at Joann's you can get one for about $2.50. Try it...you'll like it.

  24. #49
    Member riaj63's Avatar
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    My mom didn't quilt but she did make most of our clothes when we were little. Money was tight so she would go to the department stores to look at little girl dresses. Then she would go home and draw out the patterns on newspaper. Our clothes always looked like she had bought them. My mom is talented and much loved.

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