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Thread: Paper piecing foundation paper

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    Junior Member CurliQ's Avatar
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    Paper piecing foundation paper

    Oh my goodness. I have dipped my toes into paper piecing. Foundations. Anything I look up has its own review. Copy paper, newsprint, freezer paper, foundation paper. Please, what works best for you?
    ~Sharon

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    Super Member Teen's Avatar
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    I've only just started doing this technique myself. So far, I've only used copy paper and it worked great. But, I'll be interested to see what other experienced PP'ers say. Good question...
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    Super Member Kassaundra's Avatar
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    I have FPP for years and almost exclusively use regular typewriter paper ( I think it is called copy paper now). It is easy to get no matter where you live, affordable and works.
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    Super Member peaceandjoy's Avatar
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    I bought a ream of newsprint through Dick Blick. It tears away much easier than copy paper does.

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    I now use copy paper too. But before I tried the "Doodle Pad" at Dollar Tree. It is very similar to the foundation paper sold at LQS. It comes larger than printer size, so I cut it down using an old rotary blade. Worked great but I did have to feed it a page at a time thru the printer.

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    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I use vellum, but I don't sew through the paper. I fold on the sew line and sew right next to it.

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    Newsprint tears off the easiest. There's a paper factory near me, so I went there and bought a gigantic roll of newsprint for about $14. I figured out the cost per standard size copy paper sheet to be less than a penny each. Before that I bought Carol Doak's papers, which worked great but cost about ten cents a page. I took a page to that paper factory for them to identify it for me, and it's newsprint. That's when I bought the roll of newsprint from them. This roll should last me my lifetime, lol.

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    Super Member lisalovesquilting's Avatar
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    Newsprint is my favorite also. Really don't like the tissue paper that comes with some patterns. Too flimsy
    Peace

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    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I also use regular cheap copy paper. I shorten my stitch line to 16-18 spi, the paper tears away easily. Some projects I use inexpensive thin muslin, then I leave it in instead of having to remove my foundation.
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    I have used Carol Doak foundation paper and like it a lot. I have also used copy paper and find that the cheaper, the better for this purpose. I know there are people who like freezer paper but I found that it is not flexible, does not fold as cleanly and hard to tear away and stretches the thread in the stitches. My first consideration is that it go through the printer without hassle. The second is that it tear easily and quickly. I really enjoy paper piecing because of its precision. It is its own 'journey'.

  11. #11
    Super Member GingerK's Avatar
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    I use foundation paper because I bought a couple of packages years ago and am still working my way thru them. I like that they are the same size as copy paper and my printer has no issue with them. I also like that I can easily see thru them and that they are easy to remove.

    But one of the parchment paper brands is now advertising pre-cut cookie sheet pieces--17"x11". Cutting one of those in half would give me the same size as copy paper too. I haven't seen it in any local stores so cannot comment on the price.
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    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quilterpurpledog View Post
    I have used Carol Doak foundation paper and like it a lot. I have also used copy paper and find that the cheaper, the better for this purpose. I know there are people who like freezer paper but I found that it is not flexible, does not fold as cleanly and hard to tear away and stretches the thread in the stitches. My first consideration is that it go through the printer without hassle. The second is that it tear easily and quickly. I really enjoy paper piecing because of its precision. It is its own 'journey'.
    Oh my QPP with freezer paper you don't stitch through the paper like regular PP. You first stitch your pattern onto the FP by sewing on the line with no thread in the needle. What I do is use the regular paper pattern then layer up about 4 peices of FP. I hit the FP with the tip of my iron in several places so it sticks together then I tape my regular Paper pattern that I printed out to the top.

    Then when you go to PP instead of stitching through the paper you fold it back and stitch right next to it. You can reuse pattern pieces several times (I think I have gone up to 8 times before it quits sticking when I iron on my fabric) and you don't have any tedious ripping. I love FPP for this. It takes a bit more prep work but more than makes up for it in saving time with no tearing the paper and being able to reuse the pattern pieces.

    Here is a fabulous blog that explains the difference in both technique and results. However, unlike this blogger, I have found I got very precise results with FPP as well as regular PP.

    https://denversews.com/2014/03/07/fo...freezer-paper/

    To the OP, I am loyal to no kind of paper with traditional PP. I use copy paper, newsprint, and vellum. But vellum is by far the best to use as it tears easily, is semi transparent and is crisp. But the cost is prohibitive compared to the other choices. It can be found relatively inexpensively if you purchase it by the ream but it is still more than copy or newsprint.

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    Senior Member IceLeopard's Avatar
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    I use copy paper. That is, I reuse copy paper. Any piece of paper that comes into the house, if it has a clean back, gets saved for foundation paper. DH and I both use a mail-order pharmacy, and every order comes with a quarter-inch thick stack of papers about the various medication. I think I have close to a ream's worth of paper just from that.

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    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    Freezer paper, the Reynolds brand from the grocery store- 16 YDS x 18". I buy about once a year and do a lot of PP'ing. Press it on to fabric with iron, no pins or glue.
    I sew beside the fold so no having to rip through the thread when done - and reusable.
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    Junior Member CurliQ's Avatar
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    Wow! Thanks everyone for your answers!! I'll have to try them.
    ~Sharon

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    I have never used anything but copy paper when paper piecing. It is so easy to print out the foundation papers on my ink jet printer and go directly to the sewing machine. I do trim away excess paper before I sew, but that is a personal preference. I have had very good luck using copy paper, and, yes, I do remember to shorten my stitch length a bit so the paper is easier to remove.
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    Super Member jmoore's Avatar
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    I have a package of Carol Doak FPP paper but I’ve never opened it...I just use plain ol’ copy paper as well.
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    Super Member Quiltbeagle's Avatar
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    I've pp'd for years and have used many foundation papers, from Kabnet Wax (deli wrap) to copy paper. I prefer the newsprint as it is softer and tears away easily. Recently I tried the Carol Doak paper and just love it, it seems to be also newsprint, but maybe thinner or smoother somehow? It's easy to trace through, and already sized for printers so saves me from having to trim it, and not a bad price when I get it on sale online.

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    I do simple PP and have successfully used sheets from the yellow pages or phone books. Tears easily and free. Not sure I'll ever do enough of it to justify the expensive papers

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    Some of you are saying you print patterns on the copy paper. Are these patterns available on websites or how do you get them for printing. A dumb question, but I'm not familiar with those. Thank you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by psquared52 View Post
    I do simple PP and have successfully used sheets from the yellow pages or phone books. Tears easily and free. Not sure I'll ever do enough of it to justify the expensive papers
    hiw do you get the pattern you want to sew onto the printed sheets from yellow pages phone book? By hand with marker or run thru printer?
    ive used perspectus reports mailed to me for foundation work, its like newsprint thickness

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    karamarie, if you have the pattern on paper already, like you get when you buy a pattern, you put it in the top of your printer and copy it onto the newsprint, which you place in the tray. If you don't have a printer, copy them at a library or Staples, etc., but it'll probably have to be on ordinary copy paper. Otherwise, you can trace them by hand onto newsprint if you don't have a gazillion to make. I've done that, too. If you are getting the pattern for free off the internet, you have to download it into your computer, then tell the computer to make copies with your printer, with whatever kind of paper you choose in the tray.

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    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    I like just using cheap copy paper, but I have also learned that a tiny pair of forceps (ask your local nurse, they always have them) to pull off the itty bits. Works great. I have left some itty bits in the work, and it worked OK.
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    Paper piece

    Quote Originally Posted by CurliQ View Post
    Oh my goodness. I have dipped my toes into paper piecing. Foundations. Anything I look up has its own review. Copy paper, newsprint, freezer paper, foundation paper. Please, what works best for you?
    I use deli papers I get from Samís. A box of 500 sheets is less than $10.00. Canít beat the price. I shorten my stitches and the paper comes off very easily.

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