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Thread: Paper piecing??? I'm now even more confused!

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by twistedstitcher
    Quote Originally Posted by Naturalmama
    Thank you Twisted! I just watched it - it makes a TON more sense now! Amazing technique.

    So are there certain patterns that typically "require" it? Would you use it say, for a pinwheel, or just for more complicated patterns?
    I wouldn't use it for something as simple as a pinwheel. Carol Doak has some great paper pieced patterns, here's a link to some free patterns on her website. http://www.caroldoak.com/free-quilt-patterns.php

    It would be difficult, if not impossible, to create those blocks using traditional piecing.
    I learned to paper piece using Carol Doak's technique. It has worked great for me. I enjoy paper piecing!

  2. #27
    Super Member cathylynn's Avatar
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    had trouble the 1st couple of times I tried it but once the light bulb clicked on, paper piecing became so enjoyable. try again now that you've watched a video or 2 - you'll come to enjoy it too.

  3. #28
    Super Member JUNEC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naturalmama
    Ok, tell me seriously - is it really worth all the effort? Or is it really necessary to get some complicated patterns?
    Yes it is, it is amazing what blocks you can come up with - try taking out a book of paper piecing from your local library

  4. #29
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    Itís been 5 years since I did PP but I enjoyed it. It was a PP pineapple. It is not as complicated as it appears. I cut the pieces more than ľĒ larger. I used an index card (the lines are ľĒ) to trim the excess fabric because I didnít know about the add ľĒ ruler (great tool for PP!) I trimmed after sewing because thatís what the instructions I used said to do. I pieced the blocks together 1st and then removed the paper. I finished the entire top before removing the paper to keep the fabric from stretching. I learned here that many quilters remove the paper first. It makes blocks more accurate when piecing them together. The quilt was a queen size and that is a lot of paper to remove at one time.

    I used a pre-drawn pattern but would use thin copier paper. There is super thin paper at Staples. Iíve never seen it with the reams of paper they sell but had color copies made and was shocked at how thin the paper was. This would be good paper for PP.

    You can get some beautiful PP patterns for free on-line here is a link to one: http://www.yvonnes.dk/patterns.htm

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pieceful Quilter
    Glad to see you have gotten some good advice and videos to watch. I was intimidated too, but after I got the hang of it, I love, love, love the accuracy of itty-bitty pieces and points. Do I use it all the time? Of course not! I would advise any quilter to learn how to paper piece. It is just one more great option for making wonderful things.
    I agree with Pieceful Quilter. Not something at least for me, to use all the time, but certainly has it's time and place. I looked at various tutorials online as well but the only way it made sense for me was to take a class. I'm currently planning another pp project. I don't bother with the add a quarter ruler. I have an 8 in. x 4 in. ruler that I just place 1/4 in past the line and trim with. No need for one more tool that has a very specific purpose. The biggest thing in my mind is pressing after every seam. I set up a small table to the side of my sm and have a small cutting mat as well as ironing surface so I'm not hopping up every 2 minutes. Works for me. Good luck.

  6. #31
    Super Member Arleners's Avatar
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    Learn to paper piece, and your points will never be pointier!

  7. #32
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    At first, I taught myself, but then one of my good friends taught me and I am getting better at it. I really love to do it, but it is so different from traditional chain piecing you have to retrain your brain!

  8. #33
    Super Member annesthreads's Avatar
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    Every time I do paper piecing I have to go back to a tutorial and check again what goes which way up, and it often takes me a false start to get going on it again. That said, I love it - crisp, perfect points and there's something very satisfying about gradually adding the pieces to the block. And I LOVE taking off the papers! (some people are made happy by very small things :-)
    My favourite tutorial isn't a video one, but I find it very clear:

    http://www.winnowing.com/ppp.html

  9. #34
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    ok...forgive me for my confusion on this one....but I thought paper piecing was where you had a piece of a block that you stitched, usually by hand, the pattern to, folding over the seam allowance.(like hexagones for Grandmother's Flower Garden quilts) Then you stitched the pieces together, again usually by hand, to form the block. Or is this just "English paper piecing"? I though the type of piecing where you used the pattern all drawn out on the paper and stitched the fabric to the "wrong" side of the paper was called foundation piecing.

    Maybe the terms are interchangeable?????

  10. #35
    Super Member Happy Tails's Avatar
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    At the top of this page, there's a link for paper piecing basics...I read it and it looks like it might be a good one. Has anybody bought this and if so, was it a good teacher??? I'm trying to decide whether to buy that or Carol Doaks book, can anybody advise??? Thanks as always, Wendy

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaykwilts
    ok...forgive me for my confusion on this one....but I thought paper piecing was where you had a piece of a block that you stitched, usually by hand, the pattern to, folding over the seam allowance.(like hexagones for Grandmother's Flower Garden quilts) Then you stitched the pieces together, again usually by hand, to form the block. Or is this just "English paper piecing"? I though the type of piecing where you used the pattern all drawn out on the paper and stitched the fabric to the "wrong" side of the paper was called foundation piecing.

    Maybe the terms are interchangeable?????
    There are actually three different techniques that you have just described. Foundation piecing, English paper piecing and Paper piecing.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaykwilts
    ok...forgive me for my confusion on this one....but I thought paper piecing was where you had a piece of a block that you stitched, usually by hand, the pattern to, folding over the seam allowance.(like hexagones for Grandmother's Flower Garden quilts) Then you stitched the pieces together, again usually by hand, to form the block. Or is this just "English paper piecing"? I though the type of piecing where you used the pattern all drawn out on the paper and stitched the fabric to the "wrong" side of the paper was called foundation piecing.

    Maybe the terms are interchangeable?????
    English Paper Piecing and 'regular' paper piecing are two different animals from what I've been told. I do believe that EPP is all handsewn but I won't swear to that. Only learned that much taking a serger class a couple of months ago.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by christinetindell
    Quote Originally Posted by kaykwilts
    ok...forgive me for my confusion on this one....but I thought paper piecing was where you had a piece of a block that you stitched, usually by hand, the pattern to, folding over the seam allowance.(like hexagones for Grandmother's Flower Garden quilts) Then you stitched the pieces together, again usually by hand, to form the block. Or is this just "English paper piecing"? I though the type of piecing where you used the pattern all drawn out on the paper and stitched the fabric to the "wrong" side of the paper was called foundation piecing.

    Maybe the terms are interchangeable?????
    There are actually three different techniques that you have just described. Foundation piecing, English paper piecing and Paper piecing.
    So what is the difference in "English paper piecing" and plain ol' "paper piecing"?

    If the difference is English paper piecing is done all by hand....and plain ol' paper piecing is done on the machine....then what is the difference between plain ol' paper piecing and foundation piecing???

    don't mean to be a bother here...but I am really confused :shock: :shock:

  14. #39
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    OK, English paper piecing was described earlier, you baste pieces of fabric to a shape, like the Grandmother's flower garden quilt. Then with the paper (stiff like cardstock) still inside that perfect shape, you whip stitch them together. When all are stitched together and all of the shapes are perfect, you take out the basting stitches and the paper. Foundation piecing can take a few different forms. The ones that I have done most recently are slightly different. I am making the "Roll cotton Boll Roll" Christmas mystery from Bonnie hunter and one of the blocks used an 8 1/2 inch piece of paper as the base and then we sewed "strings" of fabric to the paper right sides together, flipped them out and kept doing that until the square was filled, on the diagonal. Then I flipped it over and squared it to 8 1/2 inches and then removed the paper from the back. The reason you use the paper is for a basic shape and for stability.
    I also took a class from Edyta Sitar and her foundation papers are printed with 1/4 inch seam allowance, so you sew with the pattern and the fabric on the same side. You line up your piece of fabric, that is cut exactly to size with the seam allowance line and finger press it out as you go. This works especially well for pineapple blocks. It was so fun and oh so precise. This will also work for other paper piecing, but you have a lot of figuring to do before you start sewing. Without a visual, I guess it's hard to conceptualize.

  15. #40
    Senior Member JenelTX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by twistedstitcher
    Here's a youtube tutorial.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8uaW26igygE

    Some people love paper piecing, others detest it. It looks difficult but once you get the hang of it, it's not. It's definitely worth the effort on intricate blocks with a lot of tiny pieces.
    Thank you for posting that video. Very interesting! I never would've guessed that's how you do it. I thought you had to make a bunch of copies, then cut out each piece separately with a quarter-inch seam allowance. Her method definitely saves paper!

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arleners
    Learn to paper piece, and your points will never be pointier!
    LOL! Love this!

  17. #42
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    It seems like when people try it, it's either a love it hate it. For me, it looks like too much bother so won't be doing it.

    But on the other hand I absolutely love how pp blocks turn out. You can get some amazing patterns in pp. I admire anyone who has the patience to do it.

  18. #43
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    i have never tried paper piecing just for this reason...very intimidating....but after reading this, i may just try a simple star or another easy pattern....you have to start somewhere on the learning curve!!! gina

  19. #44
    Super Member Deborah12687's Avatar
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    I can do any thing else but not paper pieceing. I have tried and all it does is boggles my mind for some reason!Will try it again sometime soon.

  20. #45
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    i have a lot of waste too...but I find it is easier using more fabric ....more scraps for scrappys lol
    Quote Originally Posted by Up North
    Quote Originally Posted by Naturalmama
    Ok, tell me seriously - is it really worth all the effort? Or is it really necessary to get some complicated patterns?
    Yes if you are wanting perfect points! It is messy and I have a lot of waste but it is worth it for the end product.

  21. #46
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    I paper piece about 90% of what I make and absolutely swear by it. Go to quilterscache.com and there is a paper piecing tutoral that is very good. Keep trying, you will love it. The only problem with this technique is the fact there is more wasted fabric. But the points and junctions are worth it. If I could figure out how to do it, I would post some photos of my paper piecing projects.

  22. #47
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    I paper piece about 90% of what I make and absolutely swear by it. Go to quilterscache.com and there is a paper piecing tutoral that is very good. Keep trying, you will love it. The only problem with this technique is the fact there is more wasted fabric. But the points and junctions are worth it. If I could figure out how to do it, I would post some photos of my paper piecing projects.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naturalmama
    Ok, tell me seriously - is it really worth all the effort? Or is it really necessary to get some complicated patterns?
    It really is worth the effort. There is no way to get the precision with regular piecing. Even with simple square in a square, I make a paper piecing pattern. No stretched bias edges, and perfect blocks every time.

  24. #49
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    Paper piecing is basically coloring on the wrong side of the paper. Instead of crayons your using fabric to fill in the spaces. Then outlining those spaces on the right side of the paper with stitches. Good luck with it. You will be very pleased with the results once you get a hang of it. You can do the most precise piecing imaginable with paper piecing.

  25. #50
    Senior Member newbee's Avatar
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    I love paper piecing, but I have to relearn how to do it every time I start a new quilt. I don't use the technique often, but really love the results when I do.

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