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Thread: Paper Piecing Question

  1. #1
    carmen4him's Avatar
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    Hello all. I could really use something info on the best paper to use when making copies for paper piecing. I have my stitches small so I guess I need a different paper. Thanks for all your help. You ladies and gents are the best ever. LOL in Christ, Carmen

  2. #2
    Super Member dungeonquilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carmen4him
    Hello all. I could really use something info on the best paper to use when making copies for paper piecing. I have my stitches small so I guess I need a different paper. Thanks for all your help. You ladies and gents are the best ever. LOL in Christ, Carmen
    I have a supply of onion skin (from waaay back when we used to make carbon copies of letters in the typewriter) that works well. I also have purchased paper piecing paper from Carol Doak that works very well.

  3. #3
    carmen4him's Avatar
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    Thanks. Will the onion skin go through the printer ok? Thanks.

  4. #4
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
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    I use cheap scribble pads I get at the dollar tree.

  5. #5
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    I have to admit I'm lazy and use whatever is in the printer. I've never had trouble with removal. I use a size 12 or 14 needle and a 1.5 stitch length. You might want to use a spritz of water to help remove stubborn paper.

  6. #6
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
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    I find it I fold it over and then use a pair of straight edge tweezers it comes off fine.

  7. #7
    Super Member Maggiesmom's Avatar
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    I also use the scribble pads from the dollar tree. I cut them down to 8 1/2 x 11. You can get a lot of pages and they only cost $1.00 each pad. tear off really easy.

  8. #8
    Super Member Chele's Avatar
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    I've used all kinds of different papers with mostly the same result. My advice is to use the least expensive stuff. If your stitch length is small it tears away with care. I fold each stitched line before I trim away the excess, so I think that helps. It's like tearing away perforated paper or checks. Love that water tip! I will definitely try that for the stubborn bits.

  9. #9
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
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    I had some of Carol Doak's papers and that's exactly what they felt like! It just occurred to me!!!!!!!!! :D
    Go to the Dollar store!!!!!!!
    And thanks for reminding me :thumbup:

  10. #10
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    I but the really big pads of newsprint, if I want to put them in the copier, it works, and I tape 4 together fo my "paper quilt" when I plan a project.

  11. #11
    Super Member QuiltswithConvicts's Avatar
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    I use newsprint, but I don't use the printer. Since I make so many Mariner's Compass quilts, I need 8 or 16 copies of the patterns. I make 1 copy and layer & staple that many pieces of newsprint together. Unthread the machine and put in a dull needle (save your dull ones in a prescription bottle). Use the default setting for stitch length and stitch on every line. Don't forget to add your 1/4" seam allowance on the outside edge. Do this by setting your machine to your prefered way of getting a 1/4" seam and stitch with the edge of the presser foot on the outside line. It can feel a bit awkward at first - like you are sewing backwards, but it works, especially around those curves! Just curl your paper up to get it to fit in the harp space.

    Remove the staples and number the pieces like the original pattern. I prefer the newsprint in the BIG pads, but am settling for the roll ends from the newspaper. They sell them here really cheap! Bonus is that you have a large sheet of paper when you need one as the roll is 26" wide!

  12. #12
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    The best paper I ever used was cheap type writer paper but I can't find it anymore. The next best thing is the greyish newspaper paper like what is in little kids learn to write tablets. We called them Big Chief tablets but there are lots more brands that will work & are cheaper than the old Big Chief. I found a couple reams of it without the lines at a flea market so that is my current method. It is just like the Carol Doak paper which I had a sample of to compare against.

    The paper from NCR forms is also fairly thin. You are looking for the thinnest paper you can get that will still fit through a printer. It will jam more than regular paper so I always use the manual feed tray and feed it one sheet at a time to force it to go slower. I use lazer printers, though. For inkjets, you might not have that option.

    I have used plain old cheap copy paper lots of times also. My trick to working with it is to pre-crease all the sewing lines. It weakens the fibers & makes it easier to sew through & remove. I tried spritzing with water & ended up with a mess. I was having trouble seeing the lines on the reverse side to place the fabric so started creasing them and discovered the creasing had an unexpected bonus side effect.

  13. #13
    Super Member dungeonquilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carmen4him
    Thanks. Will the onion skin go through the printer ok? Thanks.
    I have problems with it at times. Depends which printer I use.

  14. #14
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    I took Brenda Henning's advice, and just use plain printer paper. It works fine for me. I set my stitch length at 1.5, and it tears very easily. And it's cheap. Saves money for other things. Like fabric! :lol: :lol:

  15. #15
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    cheap paper,you don't want GOOD paper for this! I also save the fake CREDIT CARDS that come in the mail and use them as a mini ruler to tear against ,if I'm having a problem w/the paper.they are very portable.

  16. #16
    Super Member raptureready's Avatar
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    I just use plain old copy paper from Walmart. The one that $2.97 a ream. It works fine for me. That's what I first learned on and I like it. I've used Carol's paper when I took a workshop from her and then I went back to the 20lb copy paper. I like it's stability better. Each to their own but I don't think the difference in price is worth it.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Bluphrog's Avatar
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    I found a non-woven foundation for paper piecing made by June Tailor that you don't have to remove. It goes through both my lazer and ink jet printers just fine. I will remove the outside 1/4" seam allowance around each block to reduce the bulk when I sew the blocks together, but I don't remove the inner sections.

    It comes 25 sheets to a package, and I originally found it at Walmart, but JoAnn's carries it too, so if I have a 40% or 50% coupon and don't really need anything else, I pick up a package.

  18. #18
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    When I spritz my paper for stubborn removing, I've already removed the bulk and just have little sections left. At that point I'm down to tweezers anyway because the areas are always those pesky tiny spots. The water weakens the paper and doesn't pull at the seams.

    I am unfamiliar with the folding the paper to see the seamline. I always stitch with the printed side facing me so I never have had this issue. Am I missing something? Maybe I just haven't tried anything very complex yet? Clue me in guys.

  19. #19
    Super Member plainpat's Avatar
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    Haven't done any PP for a while, but used to buy tablets of tracing paper from Walmart,Office Supply etc.It's all the same, but don't buy the $$$ stuff in the artists supply area.

  20. #20
    Senior Member sylviak's Avatar
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    When I was retiring, we had a big box of the triple printer paper with the carbon between the sheets and the holes on the edges...no obsolete in most places. They were going to throw it out, so I asked if I could have it. Works great for PP and goes through the printer easily. Of course, I have to remove the carbon and tear off the edges, but I've barely made a dent in the box.

  21. #21
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
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    I actually do by paper made for PP. It goes through the copier But I only use the normal or best setting on the printer never fast 'cause sometimes it prints too fast and distorts the pattern you are copying. I also find that when I have used regular copy paper the thickness causes the thread to loosen when it is torn from the fabric. If you like to hand copy your patterns which is very time consumming, tracing paper would be fine, just not as acurate or fast as using PP paper.

  22. #22
    Super Member plainpat's Avatar
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    Tracing paper is very easy to tear when you're done. I made most
    patterns by using a needle...no thread & doing 6-8 copies at a time.
    You can feel where the needle makes lines, so a bit quicker to know
    if the fabric is covering the seam allowance.JMO

  23. #23
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lab fairy
    When I spritz my paper for stubborn removing, I've already removed the bulk and just have little sections left. At that point I'm down to tweezers anyway because the areas are always those pesky tiny spots. The water weakens the paper and doesn't pull at the seams.

    I am unfamiliar with the folding the paper to see the seamline. I always stitch with the printed side facing me so I never have had this issue. Am I missing something? Maybe I just haven't tried anything very complex yet? Clue me in guys.
    I had trouble making sure the fabric would fit since it goes on the unprinted side. By creasing the paper first, I could easily see that it was going to cover the spot.

  24. #24
    Marquilt's Avatar
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    When I've done machine paper piecing, I've always just used the cheap paper that I get in bulk for my printer from Staples to make my foundations. It's tedious and boring getting it out, but I've never had any damage to the actual stitching, and my machine is set to 2 for the stitch length, whatever that translates out to in reality.

    I use a seam ripper to slit the large empty parts of the paper and do the rest of the removal with my fingernails, which are short, BTW. I don't worry too much about some of the shreds left in the seams. They won't hurt anything, and once you've got the back and batt under your top, no one will ever see those bits of paper again. If you're not planning on hand quilting in the ditch, they won't be in your way either.

  25. #25
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    I use vellum paper I get it at staples.

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