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Thread: Partially unloading/reloading quilt on longarm

  1. #1
    Junior Member indycat32's Avatar
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    Partially unloading/reloading quilt on longarm

    My kitten has discovered that a quilt loaded on the longarm makes a great hammock. I'm going to start a quilt tomorrow but if I don't get it finished I'm thinking about unpinning the bottom of the quilt, folding it over the takeup bar and then reloading it the next day. Will it be difficult to re-pin the quilt? I know I can float the top if necessary.

  2. #2
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    I think I would something over it the cat didn’t like.

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    Super Member Krisb's Avatar
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    Try crushed up tin foil.
    I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it difficult to plan the day.

    Kris

  4. #4
    JT
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    Put clean mouse traps (that snap) on the top of the quilt , maybe on top of tissue paper. We did this with our Great Dane dog on our sofa. He did not get on the sofa after the first few tries. Put a clean sheet over the top. Shut the door if you can to keep the cat out. Or shut your cat in another room when you have a quilt loaded. I wouldn't undo the quilt. That's a lot more work than repositioning the cat.
    JT

  5. #5
    Super Member quiltedsunshine's Avatar
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    I think you can leave the back pinned on. Here's what I do. I fold the batting onto the top, then cover it with plastic grocery bags.
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    Annette in Utah

  6. #6
    Junior Member indycat32's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltedsunshine View Post
    I think you can leave the back pinned on. Here's what I do. I fold the batting onto the top, then cover it with plastic grocery bags.
    That would never work with Oliver. He'd consider that the best place ever to play.

  7. #7
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    I quilt on a vintage longarm. I have had to remove a whole quilt before. My daughter loaded it and the backing was almost a foot short. We were amazed that that could happen. We KNOW how to measure, or do we??? Of course, we had quilted too close to the bottom on the backing. She was rolling and I wasn't watching what she was doing. It was a bed size quilt and had to come off to add more backing. I was quilting with a panto.

    We marked with a pin where the quilt top started on the frame, unpinned the whole quilt, attached the extra backing, ironed the new seam open and then reloaded. It really wasn't a big deal. It was easier because part (most) of the quilt was very stabilized by the quilting. I float my top and batting, so we pinned the backing back on the frame. Rolled all three layers twice to get it even, lined the pantograph back up and finished in no time at all. Looking back, I was glad something like that happened while my daughter was here. It made it a lot easier that there was two of us reloading, but I could have done it by myself. So, the moral here is....unload if you need to and reload. It's not that big of a deal.

    Side note: After having to reload a quilt because of the backing shortage, I have not hesitated to take a quilt off the frame and reload sideways when I want to quilt a long outside border without having to roll several times. "smile" When I do that, I only load the part I need to have pinned to be stabilized for quilting. The quilt is only pinned to the leaders, none of it is on the rollers. The excess part of the quilt just hangs over the edge. When I figured that out, it saved a lot of time.
    Last edited by Barb in Louisiana; 09-13-2018 at 07:16 AM.
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  8. #8
    Super Member Ariannaquilts's Avatar
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    And that is exactly the reason why I don't get a kitten or cat as badly as I would love to have one. My longarm is in a space I can't close off. So sad!
    Maria
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  9. #9
    Super Member Snooze2978's Avatar
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    My kitty has tried that and fell thru so now she goes underneath the frame and sleeps on the rolled up batting. I've tried a spray bottle filled with water but have to catch her at it to get her attention. Sneaky little BRAT!!!!!
    Suz in Iowa
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  10. #10
    Senior Member Cheshirepat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JT View Post
    Put clean mouse traps (that snap) on the top of the quilt , maybe on top of tissue paper. We did this with our Great Dane dog on our sofa. He did not get on the sofa after the first few tries. Put a clean sheet over the top. Shut the door if you can to keep the cat out. Or shut your cat in another room when you have a quilt loaded. I wouldn't undo the quilt. That's a lot more work than repositioning the cat.
    Not to be alarmist but this sounds like a very good way for the cat to get a real injury. I'd recommend deterring with foil/plastic bags some texture that the cat doesn't like to sit on.
    *this space for rent*

  11. #11
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheshirepat View Post
    Not to be alarmist but this sounds like a very good way for the cat to get a real injury. I'd recommend deterring with foil/plastic bags some texture that the cat doesn't like to sit on.
    If you put a sheet over the mouse traps or put them in paper bags, the cat won't be injured. It does deter them from getting up there again. Works on dogs too!
    Patrice S

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  12. #12
    Senior Member tallchick's Avatar
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    Since I just quilt for myself, and I don’t have a way to isolate my long arm I just accept the fact that cats will be cats. If I give a quilt, I let them know it comes from a neat freak that happens to have cats, and the quilt has been washed and placed in a cat free place. When I’m done with a quilt I roll it up and place it in a pillowcase and store it in a closed closet that my cats don’t have access to.
    Lisa

  13. #13
    Super Member Battle Axe's Avatar
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    Name:  20180913_175129_resized.jpg
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Size:  358.5 KBThis is working for me. I have two cats, one 10 year old Maine Coon and a feral kitten who is now 2 1/2 years old. They want to be with me at all times and usually lie down under my feet and I end up stepping on them or something. So when I saw the space under the cutting table (old desk) I just bought two more beds at Dollar General and put them under there. They just moved in on their own. Sorry they are not in there for the picture, but I'm happy that they don't want to jump on the table.

  14. #14
    Super Member quiltedsunshine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by indycat32 View Post
    That would never work with Oliver. He'd consider that the best place ever to play.
    LOL! My Sophie is skiddish around plastic bags.
    Annette in Utah

  15. #15
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    my animals are not allowed in the room I quilt in--but I have taken a quilt off the frame to turn for borders, or because I needed to put another one on for a rush job, etc. I'd suggest if you are planning to take one end off every time you finish quilting that you start using zippers instead of pins to put the quilt on--would say a lot of time.

    Barb--have you ever seen the YouTube video on how to add to the backing without taking it off the frame? I just had to use that and it works--although her demo is with a small wallhanging and I had a 100"quilt on, so was a little more time consuming! Next time I definitely will measure more carefully!

  16. #16
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    Good reason to have zippers on your leaders. You can disconnect the quilt and zip it right back on. Been there with the back too short etc and the zippers saved a lot of time.

  17. #17
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    I put empty pop cans on teh quilt. They'd fall off and the cat didn't like the noise. I found if I left a quilt on the frame for 3-4 days, he'd get up on it. But if I got it done and off the frame sooner, he left it alone.

    I had set my frame up in the dining room and could not close it off. Was major motivator to building a new home for the LA.

    BTW - so far I have ended up with short backing twice. I watched a video about adding to the back without taking the quilt off the frame, and it worked very well. Basically you flip up the batting and quilt, and then pin the new section to the underside of the backing - right sides together. I normally overlap a few inches so I don't have to worry about the seam allowance. With channel locks on (or a clip) you use the LA to sew the two backing sections together. Then you unpin the short backing, trim the excess, and pin the new backing and roll it up and finish the quilt.
    My name is Cathy - and I'm addicted to old sewing machines and their attachments.

  18. #18
    Super Member newbee3's Avatar
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    If I leave a quilt on the longarm I throw a king size sheet over it.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by indycat32 View Post
    That would never work with Oliver. He'd consider that the best place ever to play.
    My Sassy Cat too, she gets her head in the handles and just goes flying though the house like a demon is after her.

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