Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 42

Thread: permission to display quilt

  1. #1
    Junior Member Rowena101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Portland, Me
    Posts
    108

    Unhappy permission to display quilt

    I have made a quilt by " Debbie Beaves" from McCall's Quick Quilts Feb./March 2010. I want to display my quilt in the Me. Quilt Show. I need Debbies' permission in order to display it. This is the shows rule, so she will get the credit due her. I have emailed the magazines customer service dept. & no reply. Does anyone have any other suggestions ? I need to have my application in by May 1st. Thanks for any help. Rowena101

  2. #2
    Super Member LeslieFrost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Trego, WI
    Posts
    1,870
    Blog Entries
    41
    Here are two thoughts:

    In the current issues of McCall's, there is a general notice that gives permission to use any pattern for public display. I think it's on one of the Contents pages. I don't know if they used that in 2010, but it's worth a look.

    Or, Google the designer and see if she has a website that might have a 'contact me' link.

    Good for you for paying attention to this, and good luck!
    Reading, cooking, sewing in retirement! Heaven!
    I'm proud to say that I'm a member of the Quilt A Month Club for the Alzheimer's Art Quilt Initiative! www.alzquilts.org
    I have a blog on QB now -- please drop in!

  3. #3
    Senior Member YukonViv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Yukon Territory, Canada
    Posts
    407
    Blog Entries
    1
    I think that you need Mccall's permission, not Debbie's. I have several cross stitch patterns published in needlework magazines and when I "sold" them my design I signed a contract letting them have the copyright for X number of years. Until that time period passes, I do not have copyright over them, however copyright reverts back to me once the length of time noted in the contract expires.

    It looks like Leslie found a general notice in their magazine, that should be sufficient. If you still have the magazine you used check to see if it still has the notice.

    Hope that helps.
    Vivian
    Yukon Territory, Canada
    www.quiltingunderthemidnightsun.blogspot.ca

  4. #4
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,662
    This is what happens when show organizers don't think about the restrictions they're imposing. A great many designers sell their copyright to the magazine when they have a design published. So, yes, they are the designer, but they no longer hold the copyright. Where does that leave someone who wants to show that quilt? Maine Quilts specifically states you need written permission from the designer...period.

    If I were you, I'd track down a phone number for McCall's customer service, talk to a living human being and explain that you need written permission from Debbie Beaves to enter and publically display a quilt made from her design, regardless of who holds the copyright or what the policy of McCall's magazine may be. They may or may not choose to put you in touch with Ms Beaves.

    Other options would be to track her down in Vancouver somehow, and/or contact the Maine Quilts quilt registrar, Susan Bulay (hyperlink is on the entry FAQ page at Maine Quilts website). The entry deadline, btw, is a May 15 postmark, so you have a bit of extra time. Wishing you the best of luck.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  5. #5
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwest Kansas
    Posts
    4,829
    Personally I think it's a pretty sad point we've come to when you have to ask permission to display your *own* work. No matter who designed the pattern, you made the quilt.

  6. #6
    Super Member feline fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    8,838
    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen View Post
    Personally I think it's a pretty sad point we've come to when you have to ask permission to display your *own* work. No matter who designed the pattern, you made the quilt.
    Amen! Couldn't agree more. What happens when you change an element in the design? Does it then become yours?

  7. #7
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    1,262
    You might want to read the thread called "question about copyright", here on quilting board, to see why you could be pestering the designer with a question she's heard a hundred times already and has decided to ignore any and all future questions.
    Bernina 640, Singer 201-3, Singer Centennial 15-91, Tin Lizzie 26" long arm

  8. #8
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    29,918
    I think someone needs to come up with a quilter's disclaimer. You know like the ones novelist put in books that says ..this is a work of fiction, any similarity or likeness to real people is unintentional.... I am seriously thinking of included one in any quilt I display in the future. This is really getting ridiculous!

  9. #9
    Super Member nabobw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Pinellas Park Fl
    Posts
    4,970
    Blog Entries
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen View Post
    Personally I think it's a pretty sad point we've come to when you have to ask permission to display your *own* work. No matter who designed the pattern, you made the quilt.
    I agree

  10. #10
    Senior Member snow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    539
    I feel if the pattern is in a maginze or book or on the internet you should be able to display it when you make the quilt when they sold or gave the pattern to the maginze or for the books it is free to make and display. For you bought the maginze or the book so you should have the right to display it when you make a quilt from it.
    Phillis
    Bring Your Conscious awareness to the source of loving and Caring

  11. #11
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Fort White, Fl
    Posts
    2,673
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen View Post
    Personally I think it's a pretty sad point we've come to when you have to ask permission to display your *own* work. No matter who designed the pattern, you made the quilt.
    I totally agree with this statement. If the pattern is put out there to use then let us use it. I feel that as long as you put the designers name or what book it came from that should be good enough for anyone. This is one reason I very rarely use a pattern. I do not display mine but have been asked by some who's patterhn I used.
    A friend is someone who knows all about you and loves you anyway.

  12. #12
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    1,262
    Conversations such as this hurt business. One person who hears gossip from so and so (in this case, the quilt show director who invented the ridiculous rule that has nothing to do with true copyright law). The rule requires innocent people to perform the equivalent of 'go jump in a lake' in order to submit a beautiful quilt that took hundreds of hours to make. Of course they're going to jump in the lake! And those who find jumping in the lake annoying, simply skip entering a show completely.

    So where does this lead us? The owners of the lake get tired of telling people to quit jumping in the lake, so they put up fences (I.e.: ignore emails asking for permission to jump in the lake.) And when the innocent people go public, disheartened because they can't get permission to jump in the lake, it gives the owner a bad reputation, which is completely undeserved. People stop buying quilt patterns, the numbers of quilts entered in shows dwindles down to women who are artistic enough to create their own patterns (I'm not one of them, by the way) and the industry suffers, especially the pattern designers who so graciously share their talent with the rest of us!

    Here's another conversation on quilting board, in a thread called "question about copyright"

    Quote Originally Posted by felixxxxxx View Post
    .. (name changed to protect the innocent)....There was a big bru-ha-ha about a year ago with McCalls quilt magazine publishing inaccurate info on copyright issues and entering quilt shows. It cause many shows to go into a tailspin demanding quilters who made a quilt from a pattern they did not design themselves get written permission from pattern designers that they could in fact enter the quilt in competition. In fact it caused untold amounts of grief for poor Bonnie Hunter, she was inundated with requests. She finally put something on her website that anyone is free to exhibit a quilt they made using her patterns and to please quit emailing her as it was completely overloading her in box.

    It later came out that McCalls was dead wrong in their article but I don't think they ever printed a retraction. If you enter a show there with a pattern you drafted yourself but inspired from a picture on the net I think that is ample information to submit with your entry application and it is doubtful you have infringed on anyones copyright.
    Last edited by Christine-; 04-09-2012 at 07:12 AM.
    Bernina 640, Singer 201-3, Singer Centennial 15-91, Tin Lizzie 26" long arm

  13. #13
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    1,262
    ... an added note. I ripped up my subscription renewal to McCalls magazine and went with Fons & Porter Love of Quilting instead. If McCalls is this inept at checking facts then anything else they write about is certainly not trustworthy either.

    I will continue to support both the local quilt shop AND pattern designers.
    Bernina 640, Singer 201-3, Singer Centennial 15-91, Tin Lizzie 26" long arm

  14. #14
    Super Member feline fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    8,838
    Here is a great website that further dicusses it. This person is not a lawyer as I understand it, but cites cases.

    http://www.tabberone.com/Trademarks/...aftSites.shtml

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    317
    It seems this discussion of copyright and how we all "think" this issue should be handled is irrelevant in this case. The show has it's own rules, and if the poster wants her quilt shown, she has to abide by the rules, no matter what we think of them, and no matter what actual copyright law states.
    I would think that if you get no response by calling McCalls, and no way to contact the original designer (via her website), perhaps you can provide "proof" to the show organizers that you did indeed try, and perhaps you can just credit the designer in the information tag attached to your quilt? Maybe at this point, contact the show's organizers and ask what to do if you are unable to get a response from McCalls? Good luck!

  16. #16
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    1,262
    Quote Originally Posted by feline fanatic View Post
    Here is a great website that further dicusses it. This person is not a lawyer as I understand it, but cites cases.

    http://www.tabberone.com/Trademarks/...aftSites.shtml
    Thank you for posting this! I knew I'd seen this somewhere, but couldn't find it this morning in all my bookmarks.
    Bernina 640, Singer 201-3, Singer Centennial 15-91, Tin Lizzie 26" long arm

  17. #17
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    1,262
    Quote Originally Posted by sarge1 View Post
    It seems this discussion of copyright and how we all "think" this issue should be handled is irrelevant in this case. The show has it's own rules, and if the poster wants her quilt shown, she has to abide by the rules, no matter what we think of them, and no matter what actual copyright law states.
    I would think that if you get no response by calling McCalls, and no way to contact the original designer (via her website), perhaps you can provide "proof" to the show organizers that you did indeed try, and perhaps you can just credit the designer in the information tag attached to your quilt? Maybe at this point, contact the show's organizers and ask what to do if you are unable to get a response from McCalls? Good luck!
    The show organizer is making a good faith attempt to do things correctly, even though it's misguided. You can't blame them for that. I would think the organizer would be relieved to see the facts shown on the tabberone.com website. A thoughtfully written email to the organizer, including the link Feline Fanatic has given us could make things much easier for everyone involved.
    Bernina 640, Singer 201-3, Singer Centennial 15-91, Tin Lizzie 26" long arm

  18. #18
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    I sponsor a local quilt show every year. If you enter a quilt (free entry) it is hung up. No rules other then the deadline to enter. Viewer's Choice Ribbons and no quilts are judged. No money but a gift baskets for the winners donated by the show vendors. The only label for each quilt is a number to vote for it. No names or info unless it's on the quilter's label on the back or if the quiltmaker want to attach any personal info. There are usually around 100 quilts entered. Simple and no hassles and we draw a bigger crowd every year. I've been to countless state and local fairs and have seen many quilts made from popular purchased patterns. Never any permissions required to enter the quilts at any of them.
    Got fabric?

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Harrisburg, OR
    Posts
    444
    This gets discussed in my other crafting circles as well... Knitting and diaper sewing. In both of those the agreed on consensus is that legally, you are allowed to do whatever you want with your finished product. You can sell it or display it under your own brand name. You couldn't sell it as "McCall's such and such quilt" but you can sell it as "Susie Q's Quilty Quilts" without any legal repercussions. Even if a pattern says you can't, there have been no cases of successful legal action. You can't deconstruct someone else's finished product and create a pattern and sell the pattern. I will add that there are acceptable community practices though, and I havent been in quilting long enough to know what they are like I do in diaper making. And I'm not a lawyer, just sharing how these discussions have happened in other crafts. And I realize this isn't helpful to the posters specific issue is her quilt show requiring specific documentation (which kind of goes back to those community standard I mentioned before.)

  20. #20
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    We should reverse the process! I think all of us before buying a pattern or quilt book should send a message saying I will buy your book or pattern only if I have permission to display the item I make from your pattern. No permission given then don't buy. If enough quilters would do that I think many of the too strict regulations would be removed very fast.
    Got fabric?

  21. #21
    Super Member whinnytoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    1,245
    I agree totally!!!
    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen View Post
    Personally I think it's a pretty sad point we've come to when you have to ask permission to display your *own* work. No matter who designed the pattern, you made the quilt.

  22. #22
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    11,199
    Blog Entries
    1
    have you tried Debbie's website? you may be able to contact her through there & tell her your situation- (cut out the middleman- magazine)
    or contact the show administrators & explain the quilt copyright belongs to the magazine & there is published permission---see if that gets you anywhere.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  23. #23
    Super Member MaryKatherine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Guelph, On. -
    Posts
    1,688
    Blog Entries
    2
    I think it's sufficient to simply give credit for the pattern. Selling it is a different matter.
    MaryKatherine
    marykayhopkins123.blogspot.com

  24. #24
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,131
    On several occasions when looking through magazines and internet sites, the designer or owner of the mag or web site post a statement that the design CAN be used for display or sales..you just can't sale the pattern...maybe McCall's does the same...go back and look...if they do then it would seem to me that gives you the permission...Good luck and post a pict...would love to see the quilt...
    Kitty

  25. #25
    Super Member Dodie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    1,396
    Blog Entries
    1
    I agree with scissorqueen that is one reason I no longer subscribe to magazines they want tp publish patterns but then not allow tjem to be used and I do agree once we buy the pattern and fabric we already have lots of money tied up in it then the time of all of our work and we should be able to show it so I just leave all magazines alone check with the fabric companies there are lots of nice free patterns out there

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.