Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 32

Thread: Pickle Update

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    32

    Pickle Update

    What a warm, wonderful, welcoming and knowledgeable community! Youíre all so smart! Lots of ideas I hadnít thought of.

    So, I got it quilted. What a miserable experience or at least miserable on a home machine. I will probably never send my quilts out for FMQ because I want to put in each stitch myself.

    The most difficult partóas I suspectedówas not the actual quilting but the maneuvering of the fabric. I did end up doing an interior stitch for the white center block. I could only do two sides and then had to pivot the quilt for the 3rd side. When it came to the 4th side, I had to get up, walk to the back of the machine and, with a hefty pull, yank the fabric through so I could complete the square. (My dogs were looking at each other as if to say ďI wonder what that word means. Momís never said it before.Ē)

    Iíll post pictures when itís done if it still looks decent. I did end up using clear thread with a bobbin the same color as the backing. I wanted the stars alone to be the star of the quilt with no distractions but Iíve never thought of contrasting colors so this is an idea that will stay in the forefront of my exhausted little brain for my next project which, at this point, will probably be a quilt made for the size of a hamster. Iím done with the big stuffÖat least for now.

    One last question for you all: What is your stuffing method? For those with a normal, home machine, how do you stuff your quilt onto the machine to quilt it? Iíve tried rolling it with marginal success but itís still very cumbersome. With all the shuffling, Iíve had the machine move to the center of the table without me noticing it and Iíve had it nearly fall in my lap which I did notice. The available stuffing space on my machine is about 7Ē. Iíd love to hear of any alternative methods since Iíve always found quilting the worst part of quilting because of space constraints.

  2. #2
    Super Member quiltedsunshine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,227
    The throat space on my little Bernina is 6 1/4." I've quilted all of my own quilts and have done up to twin size quilts on it. I get the part that I'm working on, nice and flat on the machine bed. Then push everything else out and away from the machine. I use my body to hold what's in front of me. Rolling the quilt up works for long straight lines, but not so much for free-motion.

    You might try the "Divide and Conquer" or "Cotton Theory" methods for quilting on your smaller machine. With these methods, you quilt smaller sections then sew the sections together.

    I got a longarm 2 years ago, but still quilt some things on my little Bernina.
    Annette in Utah

  3. #3
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    35,086
    I find rolling just makes it harder to move the quilt. I make sure the quilt is all up on my table to reduce drag and puddle the quilt around the machine. Remember you only need to have the about 6 to 8 inches between your hands flat for quilting. I work at right quarter top quilted, bottom quarter quilted....rotate the quilt around and repeat. This way you only have 1/4 of the quilt to squeeze through at a time.

  4. #4
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    western NY formerly MN, FL, NC, SC
    Posts
    48,061
    Blog Entries
    53
    I just puddle it as I go, but I don't do queen or king quilts
    Nancy in western NY
    before you speak T.H.I.N.K.
    T Ė is it True? H Ė is it Helpful? I Ė is it Inspiring? N Ė is it Necessary? K Ė is it Kind?

    Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we are here we might as well dance.

  5. #5
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    19,198
    Agreed... puddle your quilt. Also check out Marti Michell's classes on Bluprint... Quilt As You Go, Quilting Strategies for any Quilt. She has a method for removing 2/3 of the batting temporarily, while you quilt just the other 1/3. It makes it easier to move your quilt through a smaller throat space. So you quilt the center 1/3 with batting first, then add back on another 1/3, and then the last 1/3. It makes a big quilt much more doable on a smaller machine.
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/sewbizgirl
    Boom 20 Album of Blocks I made to swap https://www.quiltingboard.com/member...bums19942.html
    "The reward of a thing well done is having done it." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

  6. #6
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    17,439
    Libits, I am going to try Sharon Schamber's basting method next. You roll your layers
    on two boards, top and bottom and do a large basting by hand in a very "seeable"
    contrasting thread on the whole sandwich. I like the other ideas mentioned here too.
    It is a blessing, to be a blessing !
    ~Quilters are warm people!!!~
    cheese brings parties together

    http://tickers.TickerFactory.com/ezt...HJV/weight.png

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    32
    Well, Iím clearly doing something very wrong because Iíve puddled so much Iíve dog-gone drowned. ďPuddlingĒ to me connotates something soft and pliable. In reality, my puddling results in granite-like mountain peaks of the quilt. I seriously donít know how you all do it. Iíve done it on smaller projects but this one just seemed too big to apply those methods.

    The good news is that the piecing/seams seem pretty stable; all the pulling, tugging and dragging Iíve done havenít opened any seams.

    Iíve been stabbed, burned, cut and almost crushed trying to ďpuddleĒ when my machine almost fell on me. This is dangerous stuff.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-08-2019 at 08:09 AM. Reason: remove copyright pic, should have used link

  8. #8
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    home again, after 27 yrs!
    Posts
    18,467
    Blog Entries
    2
    Hmmm. think about tying it instead of machine quilting. look for tutorials/videos showing machine quilting on small throat machines. and for tying also. lots of information out there. Good luck!!
    "From hence only infer that an Englishman, of all men, ought not to despise foreigners as such and I think the inference is just, since what they are today, we were yesterday, and tomorrow they will be like us"
    Daniel De Foe -The True Englishman

  9. #9
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    11,952
    Blog Entries
    1
    Check around your area for a machine dealer with longarms. I visited a shop that offered a class to learn the machine then you could rent time to longarm your quilts your self when you wanted. I bought my own after that but have offered the same service to quilters over the years so they can quilt their own.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Sunny Florida
    Posts
    1,842
    Congrats on your success! For every reason you mentioned, that is why I don't quilt large projects. You might try folding the quilt corners in with a diagonal fold instead of rolling. Whenever I rolled them, they got stuck in the back of the machine.

    Give yourself a big pat on the back!

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Near Seattle, WA
    Posts
    806
    For the last few years I've been able to use a friend's long arm and now I'm spoiled and don't really have access But -- for years I quilted all sorts of things and all sizes of things on my vintage machine older than I am (Remington, circa 1945ish??). Here's my comments.

    Some people are able to do wonderful marvelous things on basic home machines. I'm not one of them. For one, I love the piecing the quilting isn't something I want to do. For two, I don't have the right brain/eye/whatever it is to go from the 2-D of piecing into the 3-D of quilting, can't draw worth a darn either so even sticking in 2D is a challenge. Third is I do prefer fluffier batts with less quilting than is currently popular. While you can do a lot of stuff on warm and natural and there are times when I want to use it, that's maybe only about 10% of the time.

    I tried the rolling up the quilt and using the bicycle clips, that was really stiff and didn't work for me. You've got to find what works for you, for me it was basically bunching up the extra and throwing it over my shoulder. I managed to do a simple grid on a king-sized log cabin and I can say I never want to do that again! But it came out fine, even if I was all "crunkled" afterwards, that fabric gets heavy and muscles that apparently I don't use often remind me of that.

    So what I found I could do was basic griding, simple lines or curves in the "bed" of the quilt, like maybe a clamshell and I could be fancier around the edges, especially if I went around it several times, check out what a pumpkin seed pattern looks like. You can add extra lines for extra interest and it can look quite complex even if each round is simple. My vintage machine requires a darning plate to free motion quilt and I don't have one, so everything I did is feed dog engaged.

    I started out with laying out my quilt on the floor, I moved the furniture out of the way, used canned goods as weights for the back, and then it was the big safety pins. At least once in every project a pin would open and rake open my thigh, and more often than that they'd catch on the corner of something. Still I got good at how many to use (lots!!) and how to pin them so they weren't in my way.

    And then came spray baste! Oh my goodness, I loved me my spray baste. I think most people overspray in the beginning or at least I sure did, but I developed a technique.

    I am fortunate enough to have a sewing room but I would often lug that heavy old machine that wasn't going to move nowhere on it's own to the right corner of the large dining room table so I had all to the left to help support the top and could move freely.

    Now that my husband has joined me in the house, I have a smaller table and too much stuff to move, and my layout space is limited to my queen sized bed. I can still spray baste a large quilt but it takes a lot longer. I do like the height better and I'm not nearly so crunkled afterwards. It was really nice when I was still working and they didn't mind me using the conference table on the weekends to spray baste, no crunkling at all. Oh well.

    At this point in my quilting I'm torn between a desire to get stuff done and the lack of ability to get them done how I want... I can do stuff that almost looks good on my friend's long arm even if I'm not particularly clever.

    I have done a couple of crib sized quilts on the modern Bernina my friend gave me with a super deep throat area both free-hand with the BSR and with the feed dogs engaged and it has gone quite well, but I don't really want to do anything bigger than a twin -- and most of what I make are queen so the tops are stacking up! I don't have the finances to pay the going rate for the quilting I would want done, but I might be able to get my tops basted so that they are easier to manage on the Bernina.

  12. #12
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    17,439
    Quote Originally Posted by Libits View Post
    Well, I’m clearly doing something very wrong because I’ve puddled so much I’ve dog-gone drowned. “Puddling” to me connotates something soft and pliable. In reality, my puddling results in granite-like mountain peaks of the quilt. I seriously don’t know how you all do it. I’ve done it on smaller projects but this one just seemed too big to apply those methods.

    The good news is that the piecing/seams seem pretty stable; all the pulling, tugging and dragging I’ve done haven’t opened any seams.

    I’ve been stabbed, burned, cut and almost crushed trying to “puddle” when my machine almost fell on me. This is dangerous stuff.
    I will suggest videos. (youtube.com...how to quilt your sandwich).
    Hold on, there are days when I see the word "video" and go
    Not my time to watch one.
    If your like me and aren't always in the mood, just watch a couple minutes and then
    come back and watch some more.
    It's good to have good teachers. Some of my favorites are Angela Walters, E. Burns,
    Sharon Schambers sandwiching, Marti Michell.
    I have adhd and visuals are everything to me and mood.
    Sometimes I can concentrate and stay present and other times I drift off
    to anywhere but what's on the scream, I mean screen .
    P.S. you get to see everyone's projects finished.
    We all learn socially unacceptable words and new facial expressions
    and among the threads on the floor are probably a few pulled hairs.
    In my opinion, quilting is not "easy", it's just worth it.
    My oldest dd says it's not, lol. Ok, I'm among the self torturers, lol.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-08-2019 at 01:59 PM. Reason: shouting/all caps
    It is a blessing, to be a blessing !
    ~Quilters are warm people!!!~
    cheese brings parties together

    http://tickers.TickerFactory.com/ezt...HJV/weight.png

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    32
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhonda K View Post
    For every reason you mentioned, that is why I don't quilt large projects.
    I love you, Rhonda.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    32
    Quote Originally Posted by Iceblossom View Post
    For the last few years I've been able to use a friend's long arm and now I'm spoiled and don't really have access But -- for years I quilted all sorts of things and all sizes of things on my vintage machine older than I am (Remington, circa 1945ish??). Here's my comments.

    Some people are able to do wonderful marvelous things on basic home machines. I'm not one of them. For one, I love the piecing the quilting isn't something I want to do. For two, I don't have the right brain/eye/whatever it is to go from the 2-D of piecing into the 3-D of quilting, can't draw worth a darn either so even sticking in 2D is a challenge. Third is I do prefer fluffier batts with less quilting than is currently popular. While you can do a lot of stuff on warm and natural and there are times when I want to use it, that's maybe only about 10% of the time.

    I tried the rolling up the quilt and using the bicycle clips, that was really stiff and didn't work for me. You've got to find what works for you, for me it was basically bunching up the extra and throwing it over my shoulder. I managed to do a simple grid on a king-sized log cabin and I can say I never want to do that again! But it came out fine, even if I was all "crunkled" afterwards, that fabric gets heavy and muscles that apparently I don't use often remind me of that.

    So what I found I could do was basic griding, simple lines or curves in the "bed" of the quilt, like maybe a clamshell and I could be fancier around the edges, especially if I went around it several times, check out what a pumpkin seed pattern looks like. You can add extra lines for extra interest and it can look quite complex even if each round is simple. My vintage machine requires a darning plate to free motion quilt and I don't have one, so everything I did is feed dog engaged.

    I started out with laying out my quilt on the floor, I moved the furniture out of the way, used canned goods as weights for the back, and then it was the big safety pins. At least once in every project a pin would open and rake open my thigh, and more often than that they'd catch on the corner of something. Still I got good at how many to use (lots!!) and how to pin them so they weren't in my way.

    And then came spray baste! Oh my goodness, I loved me my spray baste. I think most people overspray in the beginning or at least I sure did, but I developed a technique.

    I am fortunate enough to have a sewing room but I would often lug that heavy old machine that wasn't going to move nowhere on it's own to the right corner of the large dining room table so I had all to the left to help support the top and could move freely.

    Now that my husband has joined me in the house, I have a smaller table and too much stuff to move, and my layout space is limited to my queen sized bed. I can still spray baste a large quilt but it takes a lot longer. I do like the height better and I'm not nearly so crunkled afterwards. It was really nice when I was still working and they didn't mind me using the conference table on the weekends to spray baste, no crunkling at all. Oh well.

    At this point in my quilting I'm torn between a desire to get stuff done and the lack of ability to get them done how I want... I can do stuff that almost looks good on my friend's long arm even if I'm not particularly clever.

    I have done a couple of crib sized quilts on the modern Bernina my friend gave me with a super deep throat area both free-hand with the BSR and with the feed dogs engaged and it has gone quite well, but I don't really want to do anything bigger than a twin -- and most of what I make are queen so the tops are stacking up! I don't have the finances to pay the going rate for the quilting I would want done, but I might be able to get my tops basted so that they are easier to manage on the Bernina.
    Iceblossom! Were you in my kitchen standing over me when I was quilting?? I didn’t see you but you must have been there because that’s Exactly everything I did! Toss it over my shoulder, under my feet, in my arm pit to hold it…except I swore a lot so maybe it’s best you weren’t there.

    I’m with you…I positively Love measuring the fabric, cutting it, piecing it and I no longer mind the sandwich-making, but you can keep the quilting part. I’m not all that crazy about binding, either, but I’ve invoked the “my quilt, my rules” attitude. The actual quilting is hard to fudge, though.

    Thank you for sharing your experiences. I’m done with the quilt and not sure I want to relive the experience but it did turn out very nice. It’s in the washer as we speak. And I’m also quite crunkled.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-08-2019 at 02:00 PM. Reason: shouting/all caps

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    59
    Libits......regarding your "clear thread", if it's polyester.....just remember; no ironing! You will melt that thread......not sure if you had thought about that...... =)
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-08-2019 at 02:00 PM. Reason: shouting/all caps

  16. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    187
    No idea why it's deleting all my formatting and forcing this into 1 paragraph. Sorry for hurting your eyes... I've quilted all of my quilts except 1 on my little Janome with a 6.5in throat including a few queen and king sized quilts and it's definitely doable, but obviously more work than if I was using a larger machine. A few things I've learned along the way:1) Don't roll all of the quilt inside the throat. It's too heavy to move that way. If I'm working in the middle of the quilt, I'll roll maybe the outside quarter, and accordion fold the rest so that there's much more freedom of motion. 2) Make a "frame" around the section you're working on so that there is absolutely no drag. You basically just make a pleat or wrinkle the entire sandwich around your machine so that when you move the quilt, you're not trying to move the entire quilt. You're just moving the section inside your "frame". Picture below. 3) It helps tremendously to have the bed of the machine flat with the surface of the table. I made a very inexpensive foam insulation table topper to fit my machine by following Marguerita McManus' Youtube tutorial: https://youtu.be/g14govA4pIM except I used packing tape to tape down the vinyl and I wrapped the vinyl around the sides of the foam too and taped to the bottom so there are no exposed edges. My only regret was that I didn't do this sooner! 4) It also helps a lot to have your ironing board or another table directly to your left to support the weight of the quilt. If you can scoot your sewing machine table into a corner so that the quilt doesn't fall off the edges of the table, that's best too.5) To combat the drag in front of the machine, you can put a small pillow in your lap so that the quilt is elevated more closely to the level of your machine.6) Elmer's washable glue is fantastic for basting! It washes out completely and it's cheap. I love it. You don't have to worry about any overspray and some basting sprays don't wash out.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    32
    Quote Originally Posted by NT66 View Post
    Libits......regarding your "clear thread", if it's polyester.....just remember; no ironing! You will melt that thread......not sure if you had thought about that...... =)
    Actually, NT, I had *not* thought of that but you may have just saved the quilt. It's in the dryer now and I had planned on ironing it before I give it to him but now I won't. Thank you!!

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Near Seattle, WA
    Posts
    806
    BTW, Libits, something to consider is timing. Somehow I always ended up quilting something with a deadline in the summer heat. Nothing like having a quilt draped over you for hours when it's 80 degrees and your house has no AC!

  19. #19
    Senior Member JanieW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    685
    I’m stubborn and I love machine quilting so I do queen size quilts on my domestic. I agree with the suggestion to watch some videos. One thing I do is loosely accordion fold the part of the quilt that goes on the right under the harp. It makes the quilt less bulky but much more flexible than if you rolled it up.

    You only need the area of the quilt that is near your needle to be smooth and flat.

    i hope you don’t give up. There’s a great feeling of satisfaction when you’re finished.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    32
    Quote Originally Posted by Sephie View Post
    No idea why it's deleting all my formatting and forcing this into 1 paragraph. Sorry for hurting your eyes... I've quilted all of my quilts except 1 on my little Janome with a 6.5in throat including a few queen and king sized quilts and it's definitely doable, but obviously more work than if I was using a larger machine. A few things I've learned along the way:1) Don't roll all of the quilt inside the throat. It's too heavy to move that way. If I'm working in the middle of the quilt, I'll roll maybe the outside quarter, and accordion fold the rest so that there's much more freedom of motion. 2) Make a "frame" around the section you're working on so that there is absolutely no drag. You basically just make a pleat or wrinkle the entire sandwich around your machine so that when you move the quilt, you're not trying to move the entire quilt. You're just moving the section inside your "frame". Picture below. 3) It helps tremendously to have the bed of the machine flat with the surface of the table. I made a very inexpensive foam insulation table topper to fit my machine by following Marguerita McManus' Youtube tutorial: https://youtu.be/g14govA4pIM except I used packing tape to tape down the vinyl and I wrapped the vinyl around the sides of the foam too and taped to the bottom so there are no exposed edges. My only regret was that I didn't do this sooner! 4) It also helps a lot to have your ironing board or another table directly to your left to support the weight of the quilt. If you can scoot your sewing machine table into a corner so that the quilt doesn't fall off the edges of the table, that's best too.5) To combat the drag in front of the machine, you can put a small pillow in your lap so that the quilt is elevated more closely to the level of your machine.6) Elmer's washable glue is fantastic for basting! It washes out completely and it's cheap. I love it. You don't have to worry about any overspray and some basting sprays don't wash out.
    Maybe my problem is that the only table my machine has is the kitchen table. The machine has a small platform that is removeable but with a larger quilt, it doesn't help much.

    Is that your quilt? It's beautiful!! I love the quiet colors. For as loud as I can be, it's odd that I like quiet colors and patterns (except for the quilt I just finished. Yours is truly lovely!

  21. #21
    Super Member peaceandjoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    The Finger Lakes of upstate NY
    Posts
    2,676
    Quote Originally Posted by Sephie View Post
    ... I've quilted all of my quilts except 1 on my little Janome with a 6.5in throat including a few queen and king sized quilts and it's definitely doable, but obviously more work than if I was using a larger machine.
    Holy cow, I am crazy impressed! Love Baptist fan and that you can do that with not only a DSM, but one with a small throat amazes me. Is the quilt shown one you are working on now?

    My machine is flat to the table (built years ago w/ 2 cheap cabinets from Lowes and a piece of wood across top), but i have a lot of shoulder problems as well as arthritic hands. Pushing, pulling and tugging are a no go for me. I only do large bed-sized quilts. Hence, I quilt by check.

  22. #22
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    5,130
    I only just started to machine quilt. I'm on quilt #3 at the moment that is a large king that I am doing on my domestic machine. It is definitely a struggle to get the balance of the quilt through the throat but it's doable. That said, because I've been quilting my fingers to the bone for the last couple of months, I have developed tendonitis in my elbow from all of the pulling/pushing in addition to the 'mousing' on the computer. My elbow will be really happy when we are on vacation for 2 weeks, lol.

  23. #23
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,298
    Yes, indeed. Maneuvering the quilt sandwich through the machine's throat space is the worst part......in my opinion. It's not only the bulk you have to fight but quilt drag, especially if your machine is not recessed into the table and you have to move the sandwich over the rise of the machine base.

    Some quilters "puddle" the fabric, as in let it scrunch up in a kind of loose wad, others made a roll, like a long sausage and feed it through that way. I do both, depending on what works best for me at the time. But it's never a picnic! At least not for me. I've read here of quilters quilting a king size quilt on a home machine but I can't imagine it, and I salute those who have done it!
    Last edited by Friday1961; 05-09-2019 at 06:17 AM.

  24. #24
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Keller, TX
    Posts
    1,376
    I found that this was very helpful with movement and weight issues when quilting. I purchased this from Patsy Thompson https://www.patsythompsondesigns.com...-x20288596.htm
    She has another one that is a little less expensive. But I love the two, since I can move them to the side or back of my table.

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    967
    Quote Originally Posted by quiltedsunshine View Post
    .......edited from original comment.............I got a longarm 2 years ago, but still quilt some things on my little Bernina.

    I thought this was interesting. I have a longarm and I quilt Everything on it, regardless of size!! Haha. The only free motion I use my domestic machine for anymore is making stencils.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-09-2019 at 09:32 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.