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Thread: Pictures of the reverse side of quilt tops

  1. #26
    mim
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    I think this is a great idea -- especially for those who are new or hand quilt. The way we press the seams is so important to the way the finished quilt looks. I shall bookmark this and next time I do a project -- big or small -- I shal take pix and post
    Mim

  2. #27
    mim
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    I take a long hard look at blocks and strips before I press so I can make sure to have "most" seams lock. It was really essential when I was making a bargello with a zillion tiny pieces. I would have been lost if the directions hadn't been so clear as to which way to press.

    That said, sometimes I do have to make a tiny clip close to the seam so I can press the end of a seam the other way. Mim
    Last edited by mim; 11-07-2011 at 03:45 PM.

  3. #28
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    you square your top by making sure your edges are straight- sides and top/bottom===the quilt is generally trimmed/squared after quilting- but needs to be straight for long-arm quilting so when it is loaded on the rollers it rolls up straight- otherwise it will (feed) crooked and you could run out of batting/backing--generally if you trim/ keep things straight as you create your top- it will be straight enough for quilting
    about the gray thread---light gray on light fabrics, dark gray on dark fabrics---blends in and pretty much goes with anything---keeping you from having to change thread colors all the time- if you simply use a (neutral) like gray- it almost disappears.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl View Post
    you square your top by making sure your edges are straight- sides and top/bottom===the quilt is generally trimmed/squared after quilting- but needs to be straight for long-arm quilting so when it is loaded on the rollers it rolls up straight- otherwise it will (feed) crooked and you could run out of batting/backing--generally if you trim/ keep things straight as you create your top- it will be straight enough for quilting...
    Oh, that makes sense. I kept thinking that it could be trimmed after they were done quilting.

    Any other suggestions?

  5. #30
    Super Member quiltymom's Avatar
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    I preety much use ecru or white
    You know if your a quilter when you cleanup your sewing room and your family thinks your moving out!! Author U/K Sue

  6. #31
    Super Member Mitch's mom's Avatar
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    Thank you for posting the pictures! My quilts have never been that neat and tidy on the reverse side. I do try to trim my threads because I can't stand them, however my pressing leaves a lot to be desired. I get it all confused, upside down and backward. If I have to nest corners heaven only knows where my seam will end up!

    I do appreciate you ladies taking the time to post the pictures.

  7. #32
    Senior Member Fabriholic's Avatar
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    This is a great thread! Thanks for taking the time to post the pictures ... that is very kind of you.
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  8. #33
    Super Member SheriR's Avatar
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    When I've done hand work like embroidery or cross stitch, I've always believed my back should look as good as my front. Such as: no loose/hanging threads or clumps of threads. Stitches in a pretty order (when I cross stitch I want all my back stitches, as much as possible, going up and down).

    When I've made quilt tops in the past I only ever tied them. And I would think -those puckers will be hidden in my tying....-

    Now.... I have an amazing machine, sisters with so much quilting skill that I'd like to emulate, this quilt board with so much experience, patience and willingness to share. I also have the desire now, as I have more time to "play and create" to learn new skills such as free motion quilting, or maybe I'd like to send a top to be quilted on a longarm.

    Thank you for this post. I apologize for taking so long to simply say you ladies have taught me it's ok to slow down and be more careful AND caring about my work.
    SheriR~

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  9. #34
    Senior Member Becka's Avatar
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    What a great thread! You know, I take pictures of my projects at every turn. You could practically stack them up and make a flip movie of them. But I never, ever thought of taking pictures of the backside before sandwiching! And now that I've seen others' backsides (sorry, I couldn't resist that one) it is really a helpful thing to do. Just like taking a picture of the front to find things you don't see with the naked eye, the same concept works on the back of the front...
    "When I'm dead and gone there ain't anybody goin' to think o' the floors I've swept, and the tables I've scrubbed, and the old clothes I've patched, and the stockin's I've darnedÂ…But when one of my grandchildren sleeps on one of those quilts, they'll think about me, and, wherever I am then, I'll know I ain't forgotten." from 'Aunt Jane of Kentucky' by Eliza Calvert Hall

  10. #35
    Super Member valleyquiltermo's Avatar
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    I always want quilts that come to me for quilting to look as good on the back as they do on the front.
    I do charge by the hour to trim them up if they are not trimmed. So I tell my ladies this and they have made such improvments that I no longer get quilts that need trimming on the back.
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  11. #36
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    I'm new to the forum but... one of the prettiest quilts to me is white on white. One look says it all. What good is knowledge if it isn't shared. Thank You for your knowledge. I haven't quilted for quite a while but on the recent death of my mother and inheirting her quilting frames, I have a new zeal to quilt. She so loved to quilt. She taught so many the craft.

  12. #37
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    What a great idea of looking at the backs of the quilts!! I usually haven't worried about how the back looks because no one sees them. NOW I'll pay more attention to the backs too. The backs we've seen here are lovely. That inspires me to want my backs to look better. I'm just imaging someone being able to see inside my quilts and say 'OH MY!!! she didn't make it look very good'.
    Janis

  13. #38
    Senior Member omaluvs2quilt's Avatar
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    What an awesome thread! I never thought of doing this either, Thank you !!! I really love those patterns that give you the pressing directions, it can be very confusing at times. I design a lot of mine on EQ7 and am mostly self taught, so they don't always work out like planned, lol.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by valleyquiltermo View Post
    I always want quilts that come to me for quilting to look as good on the back as they do on the front.
    I do charge by the hour to trim them up if they are not trimmed. So I tell my ladies this and they have made such improvments that I no longer get quilts that need trimming on the back.
    When you say trimming-do you mean the hanging threads or is there more trimming involved? I only ask because I think I'm a quilters nightmare. I sew with a charity sewing group and when I show up with tops for quilting I get the eye roll. I get comments like "I had problems with this quilt, my thread kept breaking" Or "my needle broke a couple times" But they aren't giving me specifics on how to make my top so the thread won't keep breaking while they quilt. I think they are trying to spare my feelings.

    Things I've been told that I do wrong and I've tried to do better:

    1) Always press my seams as I sew. I used to be pretty bad about this, I'd press when my block was finished. Now at least I'm getting better about finger pressing at least between seams.

    2) don't have so many over lapping seams-this was more when I was using the smallest crumbs for my blocks.

    3) square up the top

    So now, I'll add trim my strings on the back as well as the front.

    What else?

    Really I want to learn! Please give as much advice as you can, even little things that might seem like nit-picking. I want the info. Because I really don't want to quilt my own. I want it as painfree as possible. So I won't be the one everyone dreads to see coming in with an arm load of tops.

  15. #40
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    I like the backs to look (as far as possible) as nice as the fronts. This is the back of a serged snowball quilt.

    I took the picture for a tutorial and the orange marks are there to demonstrate pressing each seam toward the darkest fabric. This back was the nicest I've ever made.

    Serging is not an option for many patterns - it adds too much bulk to the seams. But for this snowball quilt, serging works well and, since it's for a toddler, I think it will wear well.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  16. #41
    Senior Member shnnn's Avatar
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    what's the best way to deal with twisted seams? there's always atleast one...

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by shnnn View Post
    what's the best way to deal with twisted seams? there's always atleast one...
    You're doing good, I usually have at least one a block if not more.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by shnnn View Post
    what's the best way to deal with twisted seams? there's always atleast one...
    If it's an easy fix, I'll undo the seam and straighten it out, and re- sew it.

    If it's not an easy fix, I might consider clipping the seam where it seems least vulnerable, and then apply fray-check to the cut edges.

  19. #44
    Super Member Jo M's Avatar
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    Oh my, I must have OCD. I do my best to snip stray threads and keep the back looking nice....but those serged seams are to die for!

    Quote Originally Posted by thepolyparrot View Post
    I like the backs to look (as far as possible) as nice as the fronts. This is the back of a serged snowball quilt.

    I took the picture for a tutorial and the orange marks are there to demonstrate pressing each seam toward the darkest fabric. This back was the nicest I've ever made.

    Serging is not an option for many patterns - it adds too much bulk to the seams. But for this snowball quilt, serging works well and, since it's for a toddler, I think it will wear well.
    Jo

  20. #45
    Senior Member shnnn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    If it's an easy fix, I'll undo the seam and straighten it out, and re- sew it.

    If it's not an easy fix, I might consider clipping the seam where it seems least vulnerable, and then apply fray-check to the cut edges.
    wouldn't the fray check cause more bulk and troubles than the seam itself would?

  21. #46
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    What a fabulous idea for a thread, and thanks for all the wonderful examples! I'm striving to be very careful with how I put my blocks together and press the seams, but I still get them twisted. A lot. It's the threads and fraying that drive me the most batty, though. I see lots of room for improvement in my technique! And oh those perfect serged seams! *swoon*

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  22. #47
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    If a material is fraying alot it is worth using Fray Check. Otherwise the threads drive me crazy.
    Lynette

  23. #48
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    Love, love, love the serged seams on the quilt!!! They just look so neat. I got a 'yard sale' serger this summer and have just used it a few times. I really like it, and now will have to try it on a quilt.
    Last edited by Janis; 11-08-2011 at 11:40 AM.

  24. #49
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    This is an EXCELLENT thread ... ... Thank you
    Learning something new everyday from all of you.

  25. #50
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    This has been a very helpful thread!! Thank you so much everyone!

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