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Thread: Piecing warn and natural batting

  1. #1
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    What is the best way to piece warm and natural batting together. Do you butt it together and zig zag or just put it in the quilt and be sure to anchor it good when quilting. Have lots of larger pieces but not quite big enough. Thanks. Vicki

  2. #2
    Power Poster dkabasketlady's Avatar
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    Most of us just butt it together and use a zigzag stitch. I haven't had any problems in doing this.

  3. #3
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    there are several ways - I overlap the pieces slightly then run a rotary cutter down thru the doubled portion - when I throw away the scrappy edges that have been cut away, I then have two perfectly matched cut edges, and I butt them up against each other and use the widest zig=zag to stitch them together...no double thicknesses of batting to deal with in the final product..and I don't have to tug and push the edges to match.

  4. #4
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    When butting pieces of batting together with a zigzag or serpentine stitch, "encourage" it under the needle....gently push TOWARD the needle rather than pulling under/behind the needle to prevent natural stretching. Handle it gently for best results!

    Jan in VA

  5. #5
    Member ponyriver's Avatar
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    There is a new product on the market to connect batting pieces together. It is called "Heat Press Batting Together"
    and is probably available at your LQS. If not available there you can go to this website:
    www.heatpressbattingtogether.com
    I have used this to piece batting together for larger items like quilts and also for table toppers and runners and placemats and have been very satisfied with the results.
    Judy in CO

  6. #6
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ponyriver
    There is a new product on the market to connect batting pieces together. It is called "Heat Press Batting Together"
    and is probably available at your LQS. If not available there you can go to this website:
    www.heatpressbattingtogether.com
    I have used this to piece batting together for larger items like quilts and also for table toppers and runners and placemats and have been very satisfied with the results.
    Judy in CO
    I have not heard of this product but will be looking for it...no matter how hard I try, when I piece batting it never lays as flat as I want it to. Ok with small projects, but for larger ones, I want my batting flat. Thanks for the info.

  7. #7
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    I butt and zigzg some overlap and make curvy cuts and stich them together to help not crate any bumps or lumps.

  8. #8
    Super Member quilt queen 2's Avatar
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    I do the same!

  9. #9
    Super Member Becky Crafts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkabasketlady
    Most of us just butt it together and use a zigzag stitch. I haven't had any problems in doing this.
    Am I the only one who uses a running stitch by hand to attach them? It lays flat, you'd never know I pieced it unless you took the whole quilt apart and it seems to be doing great. I saw to do this in a book. Guess I'm really behind the times! LOL! Doesn't the zig zagging make that seam area too thin?

  10. #10
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Never thought of this, and I like it!

    So I assume you mean you layer one piece over the next piece of batting and then sew them together?

    Jan in VA

    Quote Originally Posted by Becky Crafts
    Quote Originally Posted by dkabasketlady
    Most of us just butt it together and use a zigzag stitch. I haven't had any problems in doing this.
    Am I the only one who uses a running stitch by hand to attach them? It lays flat, you'd never know I pieced it unless you took the whole quilt apart and it seems to be doing great. I saw to do this in a book. Guess I'm really behind the times! LOL! Doesn't the zig zagging make that seam area too thin?

  11. #11
    Super Member yolanda's Avatar
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    Oh! I used some Heat Press Batting Tape and it works great! I also used this stuff to patch some vintage blocks that were really weak. Here is a link: http://www.heatpressbattingtogether.com/

    My friend The Batty Lady sells this online but I've not checked her prices.

    Quote Originally Posted by vicki s
    What is the best way to piece warm and natural batting together. Do you butt it together and zig zag or just put it in the quilt and be sure to anchor it good when quilting. Have lots of larger pieces but not quite big enough. Thanks. Vicki

  12. #12
    Cyn
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    Butt together and zig zag has always worked well for me.

  13. #13
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I used to overlap the two pieces slightly, then use a rotary cutter to make a wavy line through them, then use needle and thread to whip the two pieces together - no overlap. However, last time I butted the two pieces together and used the thinnest fusible interfacing to join them. I cut the interfacing into 1.5" strips, laid it on the batting where the two pieces came together, laid a strip of cotton on top of that, and pressed with a hot iron. I did it on my cutting table, since it is much longer than my ironing board. I have that batting in a quilt on the longarm now, and the seam is hanging tight and close. I will use this method again next time. (This is for cotton batting, not for poly.)

  14. #14
    Super Member katiebear1's Avatar
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    I actually have done both

  15. #15
    Super Member QuiltQtrs's Avatar
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    Use your Walking Foot, butt edges together.

  16. #16
    DJ
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktbb
    there are several ways - I overlap the pieces slightly then run a rotary cutter down thru the doubled portion - when I throw away the scrappy edges that have been cut away, I then have two perfectly matched cut edges, and I butt them up against each other and use the widest zig=zag to stitch them together...no double thicknesses of batting to deal with in the final product..and I don't have to tug and push the edges to match.
    Just what I do, but I use the 3-step zig zag. Works great.

  17. #17
    Junior Member quiltnutt's Avatar
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    I use my velvet foot aka joining foot to piece the batting together.
    This foot has a wall in the middle of the foot. You place the batting one piece on either side of the wall. Use a large zig zag stitch to piece.
    The wall keeps the batting from overlapping and a ridge will not appear.
    I use this all the time for my quilts and charity quilts.

  18. #18
    Super Member amandasgramma's Avatar
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    I just longarmed a quilt where the owner had pieced the warm and natural with a zig zag.....just PLEASE use thread that matches the warm and natural!!!! They used GREEN thread on part of it...I didn't realize it until it was too later. I white piece on the front shows the green thread behind!!!!! ARRRRGH

  19. #19
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    I found some fusible lightweight interfacing at Joanne's and cut it with the rotary cutter in 1 1/2 inch strips to use for piecing batting, should work on Warm and Natural too. Much cheaper than the precut tape. Or is you have some from sewing, use it up this way.

    Carol J.

  20. #20
    Super Member JAGSD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carol J.
    I found some fusible lightweight interfacing at Joanne's and cut it with the rotary cutter in 1 1/2 inch strips to use for piecing batting, should work on Warm and Natural too. Much cheaper than the precut tape. Or is you have some from sewing, use it up this way.

    Carol J.
    Thanks for this hint, I to have used the precut roll of fusible and thought it was expensive, this sounds super!

  21. #21
    Senior Member GemState's Avatar
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    Like Dunster, I use lightweight fusible interfacing, usually cutting the strips about 2 inches wide. I've done this MANY times and have never had a problem with it.

  22. #22
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carol J.
    I found some fusible lightweight interfacing at Joanne's and cut it with the rotary cutter in 1 1/2 inch strips to use for piecing batting, should work on Warm and Natural too. Much cheaper than the precut tape. Or is you have some from sewing, use it up this way.

    Carol J.
    NOW...why didn't I think of that!!! Great idea!!!

  23. #23

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    I overlap the two pieces and cut them with rotary cutter to be sure I have a straight line. I then use a large needle and stitch them together. I sew straight across the two pieces, then bring the needle back to the right side and do a side-ways stitch and keep going like a ladder. I found when I zig-zagged, it indented the batting and I could feel it under the top layer of the quilt.

  24. #24
    Super Member Fabaddict's Avatar
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    I use all methods - just which ever one I feel like at the time. the only method that "shows" is overlapping. However no matter which method I used, I always quilt a little closer than normal - just to be doubly sure they won't fall apart. Do the same with poly batting too.

  25. #25
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    I do this, too. I think it is a stitch I learned back when I was doing a little tailoring just for fun. It's really just a big zig-zag but it is loose enough that it doesn't compress the batting. It doesn't have to be close together--just holding the two pieces together until you can get them into the quilt and it will be secured by the quilting.

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