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Thread: Pin baste then thread baste afterward?

  1. #1
    Member okiedee's Avatar
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    Do you pin baste and then baste with thread from the center out? Just wondering if I could do without the thread basting after pining. The quilt I will be basting is 80 x 90.

  2. #2
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    If you pin baste closely enough, you shouldn't need to thread baste too :D:D:D

  3. #3
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Usually one or the other, not both.

    Jan in VA

  4. #4
    Super Member TonnieLoree's Avatar
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    I agree with the others. If you pin close enough, you will only be wasting time thread basting.

  5. #5
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Pin basting is usually used when you are machine quilting. Thread is usually not used because basting threads get caught up in the machine quilting and become hard to remove.

    Thread basting is usually used when you are hand quilting. This is because pins catch your thread and interfere with hand quilting, plus they interfere with hooping your quilt.

    I have never heard of doing both.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the heads up!

  7. #7
    Member okiedee's Avatar
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    Thanks to all...I just don't want to waste time...I will be hand quilting...I will need to pin to anchor the layers then baste from center out...then unpin....then quilt?

    Or just baste from center out to hold the layers together, and not pin. I will have to do this on the carpet..so this will be a chore...hard for an old gal to get down on floor..LOL.
    I do not have a table large enough to hold quilt for basting.

  8. #8
    Super Member feline fanatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by okiedee
    Thanks to all...I just don't want to waste time...I will be hand quilting...I will need to pin to anchor the layers then baste from center out...then unpin....then quilt?

    Or just baste from center out to hold the layers together, and not pin. I will have to do this on the carpet..so this will be a chore...hard for an old gal to get down on floor..LOL.
    I do not have a table large enough to hold quilt for basting.
    I have pin basted when hand quilting. I just remove the pins as I move the hoop. Another option you may wish to consider is to have a Longarm quilter baste it for you. They usually charge a very minimal fee for basting a quilt and it will definitely be easier on you then getting on your hands and knees on the floor.

  9. #9
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    Pin baste if machine quilting, using a spray, should be enough.

  10. #10
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    You may want to try Sharon Schamber's method of thread basting on a table. Here is the Youtube video:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhwNylePFAA

  11. #11
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I have most of my bigger quilts basted by a LA but I always pin baste them after she thread bastes them. No matter how many times I ask that the basting be closer then four inches apart and not have the basting stitch four inches long she never does it, says that what her LA instructor said was the normal basting stitch. I doubt I use her again after the last quilt came back basted the same old way. I'll do it myself then have her tell me what I want.

  12. #12
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    Another hand quilter here. Pin basting is plenty. I usually try to get them about a hand-width apart. If you have ANY table you can use, work on it - not the floor. Center your backing wrong side up, center your batting, then center your top right side up securing and smoothing each layer as you go. Start in the center of your quilt and work your way out with the pins. When you have the entire area that is covering your table top pinned, move the whole sandwhich up, down, side to side securing as you go until you get the whole quilt pinned. The do as feline fanatic said and remove the pins in your hoop as you get to them. You'll start quilting from the center as well so you have the opportunity to smooth out any puckers as you go along. If you have a local church or fire house that has long tables maybe you could check with them and work on their tables also.

  13. #13
    Member okiedee's Avatar
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    Very interesting, she is so thorough in her explanations. Thanks for sharing the site.

  14. #14
    Member okiedee's Avatar
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    Great idea...I only have my dining room table, it is oval...but I think I could manage working that way..I hate crawling around on the floor. Thanks a bunch.

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