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Thread: Please help me. I have a mess.

  1. #51
    Super Member patdesign's Avatar
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    Did you mention the type of batting and whether it is thick or thin? These will also contribute to what is going on. I usually sew eith a walking foot and that helps, however even with the walking foot when I tried using polyester batting I could not get a pucker free back and it was just a doll quilt!!! I use warm and natural all cotton batting and walking foot, it is flat gives and antique appearance when laundered AND I have not had the problems your photo is showing. Iam not a long time quilter, but am an experienced sewer, (61 years and counting). You mentioned your machine is a Disney brother, those are nice machines, I had the entry level combo machine (embroidery and sewing) and the bobbin case does have a screw to adjust tension, HOWEVER it is best to leave those alone unless the machine is really screwing up. I think this is a "fabric manipulation" issue. The pressure regulation knob for presser foot on top is a good suggetion Hope this helps.:D

  2. #52
    Senior Member Delilah's Avatar
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    I am a spray baster and have had ZERO problems with puckering since discovering it. A lap sized quilt is a perfect size to start with. I have put together instructions for spray basting so PM me if you're interested. Good luck with your quilt.

  3. #53
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    I agree I would adjust my stitch length and try using a lightweight thread in you bobbin. Hope we have all been helpful. Let us know how you make out ok.

  4. #54
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I starched and pressed a crib size quilt top and backing so stiff it was like cardboard. I had no problems basting it and machine quilting it. Of course the starch washed right out. It would be hard to starch a large size quilt that much though. I have a no baste hand quilting frame and it is the easiest way for me to get the back stretched tight enough to baste the layers together for a large quilt.

  5. #55
    Member Judy Smith's Avatar
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    I'm fairly new at quilting but love it. Took an online course, was very helpful. Your fabric looks very stretched. That was a problem I always had. The teacher of the online course said never, never take out stitches. Practice so you don't have to. I took stitches out of my first big quilt so many times I had to stretch it a LOT to get it sewed. I should have just taken it apart and washed the top fabric and shrunk it and started again. Again the seasoned quilters can probably give you some good advice.

  6. #56
    Super Member Olivia's Grammy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dakotamaid
    Did someone mention walking foot? If not use a walking foot as well and go slow. Walking feet are not for speed.:)
    That one of the thingsI would also recommend. Some great advice here on making sure the back is taut. As someone else make a test sandwich to work out some of your problems. Good luck and don't give up. Just walk away for a short time if you have trouble.

  7. #57
    Member AnneQuiltandSew's Avatar
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    Are you lowering your feed dogs? Also, I agree with the others responding to your question.

  8. #58
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    A walking foot helps to prevent the bottom fabric from puckering. When I quilt I pin each row as I go besides the all over pinning. I usually do free motion quilting using a darning foot and feed dogs down. works good for me.
    Also the quilting spray helps to hold the quilt in place but I still use lots of pins and also if basted with thread....

  9. #59
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    The problem I think may be your tension. I read an article on this very thing and there are two area's where you adjust your tension. One is quite visible on the machine. the other is a little knob on the top. The one on the top will relieve the tension on the pressure foot. Mine, I use a screw driver to turn that knob...Hope this helps..and continue to use your walking foot with feed dogs down.

  10. #60
    jme
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    Senior Member jme's Avatar
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    When I machine quilt I use longer stitch length and go slow. I also check progress along the way. Good luck!

  11. #61
    Senior Member Maybe1day's Avatar
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    I agree with the suggestions regarding making a practice sandwiched piece and adjusting the tension as required but I have to say that apart from this I have always found it easiest to ensure that my sandwiched quilt is really tight to begin with (no wrinkles in it) and that the pins are no more than 4" apart.

    Just my 2 cents worth on what works for me. Good Luck finding a solution which works for you

    Maybe1day

  12. #62
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beebee
    The problem I think may be your tension. I read an article on this very thing and there are two area's where you adjust your tension. One is quite visible on the machine. the other is a little knob on the top. The one on the top will relieve the tension on the pressure foot. Mine, I use a screw driver to turn that knob...Hope this helps..and continue to use your walking foot with feed dogs down.
    Just chiming in with a question if I may.....In what situation would you have the feed dogs down when using the walking foot....doesn't this negate the purpose of creating a dual/even feed? From my basic understanding, feed dogs are down when using a darning foot for free motion quilting.

  13. #63
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    This is helpful to me too as I am getting ready to try
    my very first at machine quilting. Appreciate all the hints and suggestions. Hope your quilt goes well.

  14. #64

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    The suggestion for basting spray is good. Also, the suggestion for testing your stitches with a sample. This is always a good idea as thread size, needle size and fabric can change the outcome.
    But two more important items to consider are: the size of your batting--if you are using a high loft it will always require more "babying" to quilt through and most people find that hand quilting is the only way with that. The higher the loft the more the basting you need to do. Also an ex-large hoop is useful although it needs to be moved, but it will definitly hold all layers together taught.

  15. #65
    Senior Member Quilted Horse's Avatar
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    I'm not sure I agree with the back not being pulled tight enough before you basted. Sounds like tension trouble to me. If your bobbin thread is being 'unsewn' easily, that means it was not pulled up into your sandwich enough, thus the top tension needs to be tightened. This will pull up the bobbin thread more. I do agree that you make a practice sandwich using same types of materials as your quilt and practice on this until you get your tension right.
    Good Luck!

  16. #66
    Junior Member sew_sew's Avatar
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    Lots of good advice but I zeroed in on you saying the back thread pulled out easily, that usually happens when the bobbin tension is off. Take a breather before you get back to it. Hope to hear all worked out well after all the advice.

  17. #67
    Super Member Arleners's Avatar
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    I've got to agree with most of the advise already stated.
    1.Take the sandwich apart and restack making sure you stretch the fabric tight.
    2. Use 505 basting spray. It's the best one I have found it works well and doesn't smell
    3. Experiment with a test quilt sandwich before you continue quilting your masterpiece!!!!!
    4. Increase your stitch size
    5. Try decreasing your tension.
    6. Use either gardening gloves or 2 pieces of the waffle shelf liner on your hands to keep a slight tension on the fabric as you feed it through the machine
    7. Try a walking foot.
    8. Use a topstitching needle.

    Good luck it takes experimenting and patience.

  18. #68
    Super Member donnalynett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by karenpatrick
    It doesn't look to me like you achored your back good enough when you basted it all together. Did you pin or tape your back down first before you added the batting and the quilt top? I haven't found a basting spray that I like yet so I pin baste. I doesen't look like you basting is close together enough. I pin my backing to the carpet with t-pins to anchor it taut before I add the batting and backing and then pin about every 4 inches. Hope this helps.
    I basically do it this same way after I screwed up a few times. I use painters tape and tape the backing to a large dining table and then use quilting safety pins to pin all together. I don't think I've had a puckered backing since I started doing it this way.

  19. #69
    Super Member teacherbailey's Avatar
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    I vote for spray basting. That way, the back can't move around while you quilt....

  20. #70
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    We work on a number of sewing machines and these are a few thigs I have learned. Reduce your pressure foot tension, loosen your thread tension, don't use the walking foot, increase your stitch length (do these one at a time). Quilt from the center out. Chances are the loft you have chosen is too high. Did this once with a high loft and finally gave the mess to a thrift store where I knew a number of retired women who were avid quilters had the time and patients to pick thousands of stitches. Lay your project out flat and baste stitch by hand in rows going crossways to the way you plan to sew. First I would choose a new batting with the lowest loft possible. If your determined to do it with that batting and the other steps don't help- theres always the good old fashioned needle and thread. Also can hand baste the batting to the front and sew with the back layed on top facing up so that you can control it better.

  21. #71
    Super Member chamby's Avatar
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    Try loosening you pressure on your pressure foot. I saw a youtube on this subject not long ago.

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