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Thread: pressing the backing and quilt top

  1. #1
    Super Member newbee3's Avatar
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    pressing the backing and quilt top

    I am taking mine to the shop and quilt it myself on long arm she said to have it all pressed. Well I did press it then folded it up now it does not look like it has been pressed. How do you keep them looking pressed??

  2. #2
    Junior Member barbgooch's Avatar
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    If you can get one of those large cardboard rolls that upholstery fabric comes on (they are generally 54 inches long or longer) you can roll your quilt top on it. Roll it fairly loosely from the front side with the back side showing when it's rolled. This should keep out most wrinkles.

  3. #3
    Senior Member teddysmom's Avatar
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    Thanks for the great tip on keeping the wringles to a minimum

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    Power Poster joyce888's Avatar
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    I like to press with lots of steam then lay the quilt out on a bed or floor to let it "rest". Surprisingly I dont get hard wrinkles when I fold it for transporting.
    Joyce

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    I use Magic Sizing most of the time - but I also have tried Mary Ellen's Best Press - and it not only gives it a fresh lavendar smell, but a wonderful press that stays; then I just carefully fold it up and put it into a bag made especially for putting my quilt tops to go to the quilter - and it works wonderfully.
    JO

  6. #6
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joyce888 View Post
    I like to press with lots of steam then lay the quilt out on a bed or floor to let it "rest". Surprisingly I dont get hard wrinkles when I fold it for transporting.
    My mom always told me to make sure the fabric was cold before folding. I think the residual heat can continue to set wrinkles. Like they always tell you to take stuff out of the dryer promtly.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
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  7. #7
    Super Member Raggiemom's Avatar
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    I use the sizing and allow the quilt to cool before folding, that seems to do the trick most of the time.
    Heather

  8. #8
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    i use the cardboard roller, as well. it does a super job
    Nancy in western NY
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  9. #9
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I don't press the back anymore, unless it's pieced (and then I just press the seams as I am going). After I load the back on the longarm, I roll it so that only the bottom part of the quilt is visible. I mist it lightly with water while the quilt is stretched and the wrinkles just vanish. I let it dry and advance to the next portion of the quilt, repeat until the top part has been misted and dried. Actually I'm not sure that it's important to thoroughly dry the quilt at each advance, but I usually do. Keep in mind I'm not a professional longarmer, so these are my own quilts, charity quilts, or friends' quilts. A professional might be reluctant to put water on a customer's quilt, and might not want to take the time to let the quilt back dry with each advance. However I just did this with a wide back that I had washed, then dried over the banister, so it was full of wrinkles, and the longarm mist/stretch took them all out, as if by magic.

  10. #10
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    You can also roll your quilt top on one or two of those noodles the kids use in the pool.

    delma

  11. #11
    Super Member newbee3's Avatar
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    thanks for all the tips I will give it a try

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    Thanks to all for the suggestions. Wondered about this but never asked the question.

  13. #13
    Junior Member Xtgirl's Avatar
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    Even without misting, rolling the back back and forth on the longarm should eliminate most of the wrinkles but I often do what Dunster does as well, or I set it up over night and by morning it's totally fine. You won't have that luxury. Some customers foldthe quilt top and the batting together which seems to eliminate creases and bad wrinkles.
    The Potomac Quilter
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  14. #14
    Super Member tjradj's Avatar
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    Pool noodles!! WHat a great idea! :O
    I used to be "hot", now it's just "hot flashes!"

  15. #15
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    dunster, I spray/mist and roll damp so I can do an entire back in a few minutes. Then, I usually let it sit a few hours before quilting. I've never (yet?) had a problem with wrinkles or folds on the back. Like you, I only quilt for myself and not for others. I have an HQ16 which I love.

  16. #16
    Super Member Cindy60545's Avatar
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    As well as using magic sizing or Best Press, letting it cool off, you might try hanging it loosely on a hanger. Most longarmers hang the quilts waiting to be quilted. I also mist the backing, let it sit at least an hour before rolling it on my rails.

  17. #17
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
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    I have been using Mary Ellen's Best Press on the backing to give it some stability. I have a large (60X80) table that I leave it to rest on for a couple hours. I have my own long arm, so I just gently roll the backing for transport from basement sewing room to quilting room. If I am not going to quilt it right away, then I lay the batting and quilttop on the backing and gently roll that up to wait for the next step.

  18. #18
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    You can also use the long round things that children play with in the pool, they are very light weight, flexible and ease to roll. I have used them to roll fabric and a quilt and they work really well plus they are super cheap at Wal Mart or any place that sells toys even the Dollar Store.
    Quote Originally Posted by barbgooch View Post
    If you can get one of those large cardboard rolls that upholstery fabric comes on (they are generally 54 inches long or longer) you can roll your quilt top on it. Roll it fairly loosely from the front side with the back side showing when it's rolled. This should keep out most wrinkles.
    Texas raised, Texas Proud

  19. #19
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    Now that's using your noodle! (Just had to say it.)

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by barbgooch View Post
    If you can get one of those large cardboard rolls that upholstery fabric comes on (they are generally 54 inches long or longer) you can roll your quilt top on it. Roll it fairly loosely from the front side with the back side showing when it's rolled. This should keep out most wrinkles.
    I use PVC pipe. It is inexpensive, can have it cut to the length you want, can chose if you want a 1/2 inch round or a larger one. I would go with a larger one. Can be stored. Get caps for the ends of it so nothing takes up residence inside of it. I have one of those upholstery rolls stored in my shed. When I brought it in it was full of ants. There was something in the paper of that cardboard roll that they couldn't live without.

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