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Thread: Pressing a finished quilt

  1. #1
    Senior Member kountrykreation's Avatar
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    For anyone out there that has pressed a quilt after it is completed, washed and dried, can you give any pointers to follow or avoid.
    Thanks,
    Meghan

  2. #2
    Super Member quilt addict's Avatar
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    I am not sure what pressing will do to your batting. I would say if it needs freshing up I would put it in a low dryer with a damp clothe.

    Just a thought.

  3. #3
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    I wash and dry all finished quilts, but I have never ironed one.

  4. #4
    Super Member MrsM's Avatar
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    I have ironed finished quilts with no problem. I do not wash them before I give them away. I usually wash large yardage before I cut it.

  5. #5
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
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    I've pressed all my quilts with no problems. I even use steam. I just don't use a heavy touch or high heat when using polyester batting.

  6. #6
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    I press the top and back before layering -

    I've never pressed a quilt after it was finished and washed and dried.

  7. #7
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I would not recomend trying to press a quilt that has been washed and crinkled from the batting shrinkage.
    Alot would depend on the batting used and if it was preshrunk( cotton battings).
    What type of batting is in the quilt?

  8. #8
    Super Member Annie68's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kountrykreation
    For anyone out there that has pressed a quilt after it is completed, washed and dried, can you give any pointers to follow or avoid.
    Thanks,
    Meghan
    Don't press a quilt if it has a poly or poly/cotton batt it will....melt!
    :)

  9. #9
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Annie68
    Don't press a quilt if it has a poly or poly/cotton batt it will....melt!
    :)
    GMTA ...exactly what I was about to post!

  10. #10
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    I never press a finished quilt.

  11. #11
    Super Member
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    I have never pressed a finished quilt. I want the crinkled look.
    Sue

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by kountrykreation
    For anyone out there that has pressed a quilt after it is completed, washed and dried, can you give any pointers to follow or avoid.
    Thanks,
    Meghan
    I'm not sure what is in the batting of my Mennonite quilts from the 60s, so the few times I've ironed them, I've used the "synthetic" setting on the iron (warm but not hot enough to create steam) or used steam only without touching the soleplate of the iron to the quilt. I've only done it a few times for special occasions.

    My reasoning is that since I use polyfil stuffing to rest rounded polymer clay shapes on for baking, I know it can withstand some heat. The baking is done at 275 degrees F and the stuffing comes out of the oven looking like new.

    It is clear that these quilts did not go through shrinkage of the batting after they were quilted. The quilting makes little dimples all over the surface of the fabric but no crinkles or puckers.

    The way I iron them is slow, so I set the ironing board so I can sit rather than stand. I put a clean sheet on the floor on either side of the ironing board because at times the quilt will rest on the floor on either side.

    I get a section of quilt smoothed out on the ironing board, then I gently run a warm (not hot or steaming) iron over it. Or I use a steam setting on the iron and sort of wave it close to the surface of the quilt so that the steam touches the top of the quilt but doesn't soak in.

    Then I wait until the surface of the quilt is lukewarm to the touch before moving the quilt. Then I shift the quilt on the board and repeat.

    Takes an hour and a half (or so) to do a queen sized quilt.

    Afterwards, the quilt looks brand new. The quilting really pops because the surface of the quilt is smooth and the stitches are tiny lines of dimples all over.

    Then the quilt goes on the display rack and all the cats are informed that if they mess with them, there will be no more sardinies. So far, this most dire of threats has kept them off the quilts until after the special event. Either that or the fact that I keep the doors closed.

  13. #13
    Senior Member kountrykreation's Avatar
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    Thank you for the ironing method. The batting I used is 80/20 so I'm thinking it should take some heat. I will test first. I don't really like the crinkly look after washing/drying on this quilt and would like very much to smooth it out, somewhat, if possible. The only other thought I was having is possibly trying the blocking method to flatten it out? Thank you again, I'll give it a try, after testing the batting.

    Quote Originally Posted by MsEithne
    Quote Originally Posted by kountrykreation
    For anyone out there that has pressed a quilt after it is completed, washed and dried, can you give any pointers to follow or avoid.
    Thanks,
    Meghan
    I'm not sure what is in the batting of my Mennonite quilts from the 60s, so the few times I've ironed them, I've used the "synthetic" setting on the iron (warm but not hot enough to create steam) or used steam only without touching the soleplate of the iron to the quilt. I've only done it a few times for special occasions.

    My reasoning is that since I use polyfil stuffing to rest rounded polymer clay shapes on for baking, I know it can withstand some heat. The baking is done at 275 degrees F and the stuffing comes out of the oven looking like new.

    It is clear that these quilts did not go through shrinkage of the batting after they were quilted. The quilting makes little dimples all over the surface of the fabric but no crinkles or puckers.

    The way I iron them is slow, so I set the ironing board so I can sit rather than stand. I put a clean sheet on the floor on either side of the ironing board because at times the quilt will rest on the floor on either side.

    I get a section of quilt smoothed out on the ironing board, then I gently run a warm (not hot or steaming) iron over it. Or I use a steam setting on the iron and sort of wave it close to the surface of the quilt so that the steam touches the top of the quilt but doesn't soak in.

    Then I wait until the surface of the quilt is lukewarm to the touch before moving the quilt. Then I shift the quilt on the board and repeat.

    Takes an hour and a half (or so) to do a queen sized quilt.

    Afterwards, the quilt looks brand new. The quilting really pops because the surface of the quilt is smooth and the stitches are tiny lines of dimples all over.

    Then the quilt goes on the display rack and all the cats are informed that if they mess with them, there will be no more sardinies. So far, this most dire of threats has kept them off the quilts until after the special event. Either that or the fact that I keep the doors closed.

  14. #14
    Super Member Annie68's Avatar
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    I block all my quilts. After washing, I put in the dryer for a short time, take out while a bit damp, put some towels on the floor lay out the quilt, patting and smoothing it all into a straight line and nice and flat. I then put something heavy at the edges of the four corners, and leave all overnight or til completely dry. Looks nice when completed.

  15. #15
    Senior Member kountrykreation's Avatar
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    YES! I did the blocking as well, and it worked!!!! All the crinkles are gone and looks very nice and flat. I went by Lowes and picked up two 4x8 sheets of insulation board, taped them together, layed an old sheet on top, used the edge of the board to gauge square, pinned a T-pin in each corner, measured for square, diagonals, sides, top/bottom, used yarn to line the perimeter of the 4 T-pins, put the quilt back in the washer, soaked it, spun it, layed it out and pinned it to the board and this morning its all nice, flat and no crinkles. Just love it when it all works.

    Quote Originally Posted by Annie68
    I block all my quilts. After washing, I put in the dryer for a short time, take out while a bit damp, put some towels on the floor lay out the quilt, patting and smoothing it all into a straight line and nice and flat. I then put something heavy at the edges of the four corners, and leave all overnight or til completely dry. Looks nice when completed.

  16. #16
    Super Member Annie68's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kountrykreation
    YES! I did the blocking as well, and it worked!!!! All the crinkles are gone and looks very nice and flat. I went by Lowes and picked up two 4x8 sheets of insulation board, taped them together, layed an old sheet on top, used the edge of the board to gauge square, pinned a T-pin in each corner, measured for square, diagonals, sides, top/bottom, used yarn to line the perimeter of the 4 T-pins, put the quilt back in the washer, soaked it, spun it, layed it out and pinned it to the board and this morning its all nice, flat and no crinkles. Just love it when it all works.

    Quote Originally Posted by Annie68
    I block all my quilts. After washing, I put in the dryer for a short time, take out while a bit damp, put some towels on the floor lay out the quilt, patting and smoothing it all into a straight line and nice and flat. I then put something heavy at the edges of the four corners, and leave all overnight or til completely dry. Looks nice when completed.
    Hey, sounds great!
    :thumbup:

  17. #17
    Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by kountrykreation
    YES! I did the blocking as well, and it worked!!!! All the crinkles are gone and looks very nice and flat. I went by Lowes and picked up two 4x8 sheets of insulation board, taped them together, layed an old sheet on top, used the edge of the board to gauge square, pinned a T-pin in each corner, measured for square, diagonals, sides, top/bottom, used yarn to line the perimeter of the 4 T-pins, put the quilt back in the washer, soaked it, spun it, layed it out and pinned it to the board and this morning its all nice, flat and no crinkles. Just love it when it all works.
    GENIUS!!!

    If I ever want to make a quilt look new again, I will try blocking first.

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