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Thread: Pressing seams open...what a PAIN

  1. #26
    Junior Member krisgray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jingle View Post
    I press the seam open with a dry iron, turn to right side and spritz on water with a spray bottle. No steam to burn my fingers. Pressing open with your fingernail before pressing helps too.
    This is how I do it - opening those seams just takes much longer than pressing to the dark. But, sometimes it's gotta be done.

  2. #27
    Junior Member dianeinsterling's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    A strip stick can be helpful: http://thestripstick.com/buy_products . Love mine!
    I love mine too!!

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retiree View Post
    I have found my mini iron to be extremely helpful when I have tedious pressing to do. I used it a lot making bias for a recent applique project.
    I also use my mini iron for hard to get to seams. I have a hook right beside my sewing machine just for mini iron as it is so handy to use right at the machine. after pressing open seams w/mini I like to turn my block over and steampress so everything lies flat.

  4. #29
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    I also dry iron the seams open without setting them, then flip over, lightly spray with water, then press again. Of course I learned to sew clothing before quilting, so pressing seams open is ingrained in me. I actually like pressing the seams open as opposed to one side because you get a neater seam.

  5. #30
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    I usually only use steam when starching yardage befor cutting. Using a fine mist for pressing seams helps with the burn issues. You can buy a nice little mister bottle at a dollar store for around a dollar, good investment.

  6. #31
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buckeye Rose View Post
    I have been setting the seam with the steam iron, then flipping over and pressing seam to one side, then opening up the seam completely and pressing. I keep burning my fingers with the steam, but without the steam, the seam doesn't want to stay open. Suggestions anyone?
    Turn the steam off, do not set the seam, do not press to one side. After sewing, flip the fabric, gentle press the seam open with your fingers and put the front part of the iron on the seam and lift the strip slightly ahead of the iron. Once you press and set the seam it will be near impossible to press it open.
    Anna Quilts

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    A strip stick can be helpful: http://thestripstick.com/buy_products . Love mine!
    I ordered and just got mine last week. I haven't used them yet, but am looking forward to trying it on my OBW.

  8. #33
    Super Member BettyGee's Avatar
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    I have a "finger pressing" tool that a friend, from this board, gave to me. It is a wooden sitck with beveled edge, I lay the project down and finger press the seam open and then use the iron. This has saved me many injured fingers and gives me a nice flat seam every time.
    BettyGee, quilter on a Rocky Mountain High

  9. #34
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
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    You can make your own pressing stick - just take a wooden clothespin apart & use one half of it. You can make a pressing ham out of a rolled up magazine covered with padding & material - sort of like a rolled up ironing board.
    TwandasMom

  10. #35
    Super Member notmorecraft's Avatar
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    The bamboo pokey thing that comes with a dresden template is great for opening seams and you can use it to lightly press the seam open and the use the point of the iron, no burnt fingers.

  11. #36
    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitsie View Post
    I found that opening a bit at one end then curling (lifting) up the seam an inch or so in front of your iron as you sew along it helps a lot. I set the seam then just open it without pressing to one side.
    That's what I do. Seems to work for me.

  12. #37
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    Last year I made a Jacob's ladder with hundreds of 4 patches. I had sewed them together and then sat on the sofa and finger pressed the furled seams of the whole pile while I watched (sometimes listened to) TV.. When one pile started to tip over, I started a new pile. The next morning I wasn't sure I would find the seams still in place, but they were perfect. Then it was easy to iron them all.

    I have also found that finger pressing lots of seams open while just sitting on the sofa makes it much easier to iron later. Also think of the time saved. It's easier to get the seams open with two hands than with one hand on the iron waiting for the other one to do it alone. And I spend a lot less time with the iron heating. Save the earth!
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  13. #38
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    A sleeve ham is great, and you can also make something similar yourself. Make a tube of fabric, roll up a magazine and insert it in the tube... you have your own, personal "round thingy" to press your opened seams!

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    A strip stick can be helpful: http://thestripstick.com/buy_products . Love mine!
    These are great and you can make your own using half (not quarter) round from the hardware store. cover with a batting scrap and any old fabric.

  15. #40
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    A few years ago, I took a class in Strips'n'Curves. The instructor showed us how to lift the seam slightly and press the seam open. As you continue to press the seam open, keep lifting the seam up a bit from the ironing board and keep on pressing ahead. There was no setting of the seam. Then carefully turn over to the other side to press the seam. Works like a charm.

  16. #41
    Super Member karenpatrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    A strip stick can be helpful: http://thestripstick.com/buy_products . Love mine!
    I made one of these for next to nothing out of a left-over piece of half round and some batting and a piece of left over fabric.

  17. #42
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    Get yourself a set of strip sticks.....useful for pressing finished quilt, etc. Not expensive and wonderful! You will not be sorry. htttp://thestripstick.com/buy_products These were designed by a Ann Babb who belongs to our guild. I don't even know her so I am not connected in any way. I borrowed a set the first time I used them and had to have a set later.

  18. #43
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    Recently, I had seen advertised covers for your fingers for just that reason. Wasn't interested at the time so didn't pay much attention. I'll try to find it again and will let you know if I do.

  19. #44
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sally J View Post
    I learned from a teacher that if you press the seam to the side as usual (I know this seems strange), then put the point of the iron on the lower flat seam and move forward. Wow, the seam opens up without using finger or tools. It works.
    This is how I was taught to do it too.
    Got fabric?

  20. #45
    Super Member feffertim's Avatar
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    I use the strip stick also. It works well

  21. #46
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    One last suggestion. Go to Home Depot or Lowes and purchase the largest dowel they have. Have them cut it in half. Them have them make it as long as you want it. Mine is 14 inches long. I place my seam on it and start with the point of my iron in the seam and press down the seam. Taking your time and pressing open the seams on many quilts makes them look so pretty.
    Have a great quilting day!

  22. #47
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    i think i,ll try making one too ,but using a wall trim only because it,s rounded on top and flat on bottom, will see if it works out wish me luck
    we can make our plans but the out come is in god,s hands nellie diaz

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buckeye Rose View Post
    I have been trying different block patterns for two twin quilts I need to make. I finally found one that works with the jelly rolls I have and isn't beyond my skill level. The problem is that all the seams need to be pressed open. I find that part of making the block such a pain....literally! I have been setting the seam with the steam iron, then flipping over and pressing seam to one side, then opening up the seam completely and pressing. I keep burning my fingers with the steam, but without the steam, the seam doesn't want to stay open. I know there has to be an easier method to open these 1/4"seams without burning the fingers. Suggestions anyone?
    This is the site I was talking about earlier: http://www.nancysnotions.com/product...himbles+set.do

  24. #49
    Senior Member bobquilt3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    A strip stick can be helpful: http://thestripstick.com/buy_products . Love mine!
    That does look really neat but I'm sure you can get a piece of half round wood molding at Lowes or Home Depot for a lot less than the prices quoted.

  25. #50
    Super Member fireworkslover's Avatar
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    I bought a length of trim from Home Depot. I tried to find half round, but couldn't, so got a piece that's rounded enough. The wood I got was about $7.50 for an 8' piece. When I got it home I cut off a 2' piece and kept the rest long. I use the 2' section on my small ironing table, that's right beside my sewing machine and the long one for my large ironing board. Now when I go to iron my one block wonder tops, just place the wood on the ironing board, lay the top over and line up the seam you are going to press on top of the molding. The wood holds the fabric up a bit and the rest drapes down. If your section isn't real long or wide, holding it up at an angle with the hand that's not holding the iron. Stick the nose of your iron in to get the seam open and go. It works slick.
    Last edited by fireworkslover; 09-11-2013 at 04:15 PM.

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