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-   -   Square in a square ruler (https://www.quiltingboard.com/main-f1/square-square-ruler-t312578.html)

bearisgray 09-25-2020 07:18 AM

I watched part of one of her videos on using that ruler.

Her method of attaching rectangles to the sides of a square and trimming them down - seems cumbersome - and wasteful of fabric - to me.

The ruler also looks like something I would have to pay close attention to while using it. Maybe I would put tape on the "where I should line it up" so that I would remember my "target spot".

I have learned to make "test units" before cutting a zillion pieces - especially where/when triangles are involved. Sometimes cutting that triangle 1/16 inch larger (or smaller) makes the difference from not fitting to fitting almost fitting perfectly. (In my world - "perfect" is a word that is right up there with "always" and "never" - just another of my quirks - it happens occasionally, but not often)


platyhiker 09-25-2020 09:47 AM

I also watched part one of her videos, and like bearisgray, I am struck by her method being pretty wasteful of fabric. (It doesn't have to be - at one point in the video she says that one can use triangle scraps, but she demonstrates the method with rectangle strips and then cuts of good sized pieces, and cuts off even more when she shows how to do two rounds around the center square.)

I can see that her method can provide good precision, but there are other ways to get that precision. Personally, that video doesn't make me want to switch from my current methods. I found another video where she shows making half square triangles. The amount of fabric wasted seems quite large to me! The method of making them 8 at a time (slightly oversized and then cutting them down to size) has almost no fabric waste and seems like about the same amount of work.

I find it very interesting to see a quite different approach. I salute people who come up new methods to give people more options of getting the results they want.

RedGarnet222 09-25-2020 10:24 AM

I won a whole set of her rulers and books at a quilt show one year and have yet to have the time to learn it. Sad but true.

hray 09-26-2020 12:18 PM

I was intrigued by Deb Tucker's square-in-a-square ruler. Her methods have very little waste, and I like the precision of making a unit a bit oversize and cutting it down. You can obviously do it with regular rulers, too...which is the reason I haven't bought hers yet. But having the marks to easily position the ruler is a nice idea.

However, I realized this week, if you buy a kit you may not have the option to use her method because the kit dictates the size/shape of the fabric provided. But I do like the convenience of having someone else pick out fabrics that go together.

juliasb 09-26-2020 12:23 PM

I have the ruler but have not used it yet. I am still a bit gun shy to trying out the rulers I recently bought. The square in a square is one of them.

dee1245 09-26-2020 04:21 PM

Square in a square
 
I just watched a video on how to use the ruler. It is a little confusing. I have made these blocks before faster and easier to do.

IowaStitcher 10-04-2020 05:10 AM

I too am a one time user of her ruler/method. Does anyone have suggestions for other uses for this ruler? I am not a fan of 'one trick pony' rulers so don't usually do projects that require a ruler for one technique only.

Hagridsmom 02-03-2021 10:26 PM

what is the difference between the original ruler and the new mini one? The packaging looks the same size and I think you can do fewer options with the newer one. Maybe if someone explained how to do it with the easy angle ruler (hint, hint) it would prove to be enough information to get by without her ruler. Could a pineapple block ruler be used? I think I have 2 different brands of those. I was watching the Rebecca Paige Quilting Summit yesterday and the Quilting Cowboy was showing a quilt in his new fabric line that was done with her method. It piqued my interest in them again. I remember when that first came out!
Thanks for any explanation.

sandy l 02-04-2021 04:22 AM


Originally Posted by platyhiker (Post 8420389)
I also watched part one of her videos, and like bearisgray, I am struck by her method being pretty wasteful of fabric. (It doesn't have to be - at one point in the video she says that one can use triangle scraps, but she demonstrates the method with rectangle strips and then cuts of good sized pieces, and cuts off even more when she shows how to do two rounds around the center square.)

I can see that her method can provide good precision, but there are other ways to get that precision. Personally, that video doesn't make me want to switch from my current methods. I found another video where she shows making half square triangles. The amount of fabric wasted seems quite large to me! The method of making them 8 at a time (slightly oversized and then cutting them down to size) has almost no fabric waste and seems like about the same amount of work.

I find it very interesting to see a quite different approach. I salute people who come up new methods to give people more options of getting the results they want.

After looking at the part one video, I remembered that at one time I had this book and ruler. Tried it a couple of times, did not like the results and passed the book and ruler to someone here on quiltboard about 5 or 6 years ago.

Macybaby 02-04-2021 05:50 AM

I do mine with the easy angle ruler. I started by drawing out the finished size, then drawing the corner lines and taking my ruler and figuring out what the inner square needs to be (this is important). At one point I had a chart with each size.

Then I figure out what WOF I need for the corners and cut them with the easy angle ruler method, Hard to explain in writing, but if you've been using it then you'll be familiar with how that works. I'll go 1.4" wider than needed so I can trim. I will finger crease the center square and then line up the point of the triangle with that crease so I'll have it centered for when I trim.

One word of caution, you are starting out with a square that will end up on point. So if you have lines that you want to end up horizontal on the quilt, you need to cut them bias and then you might want to do the covered corners method.


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