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Thread: Printing on fabric to quilt

  1. #26
    Super Member knlsmith's Avatar
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    I too am an HP fan. Mine is a combo 8170 c. Cost almost 400 when I got it a few years ago. Great on ink and prints on the inkjet fabric just fine.

  2. #27

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    i just finished my fifth memory quilt and I used "printed treasures fabric sheets in my HP printer Model F4280 and had no problems at all

  3. #28
    Super Member scowlkat's Avatar
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    go to bryerpatch.com and see Carol Breyer Fallert's tips for printing on fabric. I use a HP Photosmart printer and have used both commercial fabric sheets and fabric I have used bubble jet set on. One thing it is important to consider is the paper path. I don't know much about Kodak printers but do know that the type of ink is most important for longevity and must be archival (pigment) inks. No matter what you go with, repeated washings will fade over time and there has not been enough time for studies to conclusively state how long the photos will remain vibrant.

    All that said, it is very rewarding to make a memory project. Have fun and would love to see what you come up with!

  4. #29
    Senior Member ranbro's Avatar
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    May I ask what is "PDF fabric" and where can it be purchased?

  5. #30
    Super Member scowlkat's Avatar
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    PDF is prepared for Dying fabric. It does not have any chemicals such as sizing so it will receive dyes or inks without having to prewash. I prewash anyway just to take care of shrinkage and dust or dirt that may have gotten on the fabric. You can purchase it as most quilt shops, JoAnnes, Hancocks of Paducah, etc. I don't feel it necessary to use for printing photos though. As long as you prewash to remove chemicals and use archivalinks, you should be okay.

  6. #31
    cjk
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    Senior Member cjk's Avatar
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    I've never done the printing on fabric before but want to. Does the fabric need to feed straight thru the printer?

  7. #32
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    I recently did a memory quilt for my granddaughter's graduation. I purchased material, freezer paper in paper size sheets, and the bubble jet set and rinse at Nancy's Notions. I purchased them when I had free shipping. It all worked out great!! I have also viewed the Quilt Show segment on Epson printers and plan to purchase one in the future. My HP did a great job though. I believe the Epson ink would last longer but have no proof. Nancy also sells a heavy plastic paper size template for cutting fabric to the correct size.

  8. #33
    Senior Member ranbro's Avatar
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    Great-thanks for the info on PDF--quess I should have figured that one out for myself.

  9. #34
    Member Yankee Quilter's Avatar
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    I have tried several brands of fabric sheets and have made several photo quilts. I had the best results when I used my own muslin treated with Bubble Jet Set. It's really a great product. However, it's a bit time consuming a a little messy because you need soak the fabric in the solution then let it drip dry. So when I'm being lazy or in a hurry, I use the already prepared fabric sheets. Crafter's Image cotton photo fabric comes in 8 1/2 x 11" sheets and also on rolls of 8 1/2" by several yards. It also comes in silk sheets. A good product.

  10. #35
    Member Gael's Avatar
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    I've never printed on cloth, but I have printed on iron-on transfer paper and ironed the design on a T-shirt with good results. My HP printer, as well as the PrintShop program I used, have a way to choose reversed printing for iron-on so it will come out the right way.

  11. #36
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    I have a Canon printer that works well
    I purchase fabric sheets that are good to go

    Printed Treasures is available at Joanns - they make both iron on and peel off. Make sure you get the one you want

    http://www.cjenkinscompany.com is where I get mine.

  12. #37
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjk
    I've never done the printing on fabric before but want to. Does the fabric need to feed straight thru the printer?
    No, it can feed through so it flips, no problem as long as the 'stiffener' (freezer paper, commercial backing, label sheet, etc) is solidly attached and the fabric is smooth. Be sure to trim any loose threads from the edges!

    Also, any fabric can be prepared for dyeing and thus made the same as PFD. Simply wash it with Synthapol or laundry detergent and dry it. If a drop of water does not bead up on the surface, you're good to go. It water still beads up, wash and dry it again. Commercial PFD simply has all processing chemicals removed from the fibers and is sold as a convenience so you don't have to do that yourself. (This process of doing it yourself is called 'scouring'.)

  13. #38
    Super Member amandasgramma's Avatar
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    I have the Epson Artisan 810...I haven't gotten it to print on the freezer paper/fabric yet!!! The FP/fabric jams the printer EVERY time!!!! ARRRRGH I've done all of the above, the fabric is adhered to the freezer paper, no threads, etc, and still have problems. I didn't have ANY problems doing this with my HP!!!!

  14. #39
    Log Cabin Quilter's Avatar
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    I had trouble printing on fabric the last time I tried on my HP printer. One corner kept folding over. I was using the same type sheets I used previously with success.

  15. #40
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  16. #41
    Super Member mar32428's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paintmejudy
    Just realize you cannot print on fabric with a laser jet printer, only with an ink jet. My HP prints fabric just fine, in fact have had HPs for years and never had a problem with any of them. Good luck in your search.
    Same for me. Just be sure you hand feed each sheet.

  17. #42
    Super Member mar32428's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corry
    Quote Originally Posted by kat13
    I print on fabric all the time. I have a HP Photosmart C4240 and love it! Sorry about your Dad, I made a memory quilt for my Mom when my Dad passed away, it took me awhile to get started on it but then it was such a comfort. I highly recommend HP!
    Kat
    What do you use to print on? Do you use the fabric sheets that are already treated or do you the bubblejet stuff? Just want to be sure I am going to be using a method that will stand up to washing, etc. I appreciate your advice.
    I have used both, the commercial kind and the fabric I treated with bubble jet. I much prefer the material I treated myself because first, I bought a much better quality and thread count, I got a pure white which printed out colors sooooo much brighter and I could fit the pics on the fabric to the size I wanted. Didn't waste fabric that way.

  18. #43
    Super Member sewmom's Avatar
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    i have always used 200ct. muslin or Egyption cotton-something with a real smooth feel. i will cut it a little bit bigger so after it's adhered to the freezer paper, then i can trim it to fit in the printer. one thing i ALWAYS do is cut the freezer paper longer and the fabric to 10 1/2". i then fold the FP over on itself, making sure that the paper covers the edge of the fabric. i then take something and real crease that top edge that feeds into the computer so it won't jam the computer.(ask me how i know it'll do that) i do like to leave it on the Fp for a day or so before i remove it. i make all my quilt labels this way and the only time i've ever had a problem is with the last quilt that i did. i had scanned the fabric so it would blend in the back. well i didn't leave it on the FP for more than 15 min. and the next day i washed it. well the label really faded!i don't know if this was b/c it was Cartridge worlds Ink or b/c i didn't leave it long enough. but most of the time i am very satisfied with the whole process. sorry this is so long.

  19. #44
    Senior Member Jo Belmont's Avatar
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    It was just last week I discovered a sure-fire method for producing and printing PERMANENT, WASHABLE-WITHOUT-FADING LABELS of any size (up to letter/legal) on ANY quilting fabric (as long as it has been washed first to get rid of the sizing, etc.). Of course you have many font choices through whatever program/word processor you use, but don't forget that you can use colors, add pictures, graphics, etc. . . . whatever you can print, you can put on the label.

    Prior to this, I had prematurely put to rest a couple printers and said aloud a whole bunch of words I didn't even know I knew.

    HERE'S HOW I DISCOVERED TO DO IT:

    You need 1) a piece of cardstock, 2) a can of quilt basting spray, and 3) a piece of washed, ironed (NOT starched) fabric for your label at least as large as the cardstock.

    Lay the cardstock on a sheet of newsprint or freezer paper, etc. to catch any overspray. Give it a good spray overall with the basting spray, being very sure to get all the edges, especially the top and bottom edges. Lay fabric on top of the cardstock and smooth out so it's all very flat. Unless you have really "dampened" your cardstock, you shouldn't need to put the cardstock/fabric under a book or anything; just give it a few minutes to be sure it is absolutely dry.

    With your rotary cutter, trim the fabric exactly to the edges of the cardstock. Place in your printer in the proper way so the fabric meets the ink cartridges (on mine, as with most printers, the fabric goes in the tray face down and comes out face up with the image thereon).

    HERE ARE SOME PRINTING TIPS:

    Start your label at least a couple inches down the page. That way, if your printer happens to "hesitate" just a tad when it's grabbing the cardstock/fabric, it will have settled after the first inch or two and your image won't be distorted.

    Set your printer up for "BEST" quality. That ensures that you're going to get maximum ink and saturation on the fabric without a "bleed."

    Let the newly printed image set for at least 10 minutes, then iron with a piece of unstarched fabric over the image. MAKE SURE TO USE YOUR IRON ON DRY AND TRY IT OUT BEFORE PUTTING IT OVER THE LABEL TO MAKE SURE ALL THE WATER/STEAM IS GONE. Set it on high heat and iron over it several times with the piece of fabric over it. This "sets" the ink. Let cool thoroughly before cutting and sewing it.

    THE PRINTER I USE:
    I have used inkjets (HPs mostly), but I've had the absolute most resounding success with my KODAK ESP7 printer which uses pigment inks, unlike the inket cartridges. The inkjets will work, but I think the pigment inks are somewhat more lasting.

    (Well, I certainly didn't think I'd go on so long, but perhaps this will help.) Thanks for your time. ~Jo

  20. #45
    Super Member goldendog55's Avatar
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    I bought an Epson printer last time I needed one. With the pigment ink in an Epson, the fabric needs no pretreating. I just use double stick tape and tape the fabric onto a large piece of photo paper, which can be re-used. The ink is a little more, but it is definetely worth the added cost and hassle of pre-treated fabrics, and any fabric can be used!

  21. #46
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    Don't get an hp. Uses too much ink.

  22. #47
    Junior Member Corry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldendog55
    I bought an Epson printer last time I needed one. With the pigment ink in an Epson, the fabric needs no pretreating. I just use double stick tape and tape the fabric onto a large piece of photo paper, which can be re-used. The ink is a little more, but it is definetely worth the added cost and hassle of pre-treated fabrics, and any fabric can be used!
    No bubblejet needed?

  23. #48
    Super Member goldendog55's Avatar
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    No, pigment inks require nothing, except a piece of fabric!

  24. #49
    Junior Member Corry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jo Belmont
    It was just last week I discovered a sure-fire method for producing and printing PERMANENT, WASHABLE-WITHOUT-FADING LABELS of any size (up to letter/legal) on ANY quilting fabric (as long as it has been washed first to get rid of the sizing, etc.). Of course you have many font choices through whatever program/word processor you use, but don't forget that you can use colors, add pictures, graphics, etc. . . . whatever you can print, you can put on the label.

    Prior to this, I had prematurely put to rest a couple printers and said aloud a whole bunch of words I didn't even know I knew.

    HERE'S HOW I DISCOVERED TO DO IT:

    You need 1) a piece of cardstock, 2) a can of quilt basting spray, and 3) a piece of washed, ironed (NOT starched) fabric for your label at least as large as the cardstock.

    Lay the cardstock on a sheet of newsprint or freezer paper, etc. to catch any overspray. Give it a good spray overall with the basting spray, being very sure to get all the edges, especially the top and bottom edges. Lay fabric on top of the cardstock and smooth out so it's all very flat. Unless you have really "dampened" your cardstock, you shouldn't need to put the cardstock/fabric under a book or anything; just give it a few minutes to be sure it is absolutely dry.

    With your rotary cutter, trim the fabric exactly to the edges of the cardstock. Place in your printer in the proper way so the fabric meets the ink cartridges (on mine, as with most printers, the fabric goes in the tray face down and comes out face up with the image thereon).

    HERE ARE SOME PRINTING TIPS:

    Start your label at least a couple inches down the page. That way, if your printer happens to "hesitate" just a tad when it's grabbing the cardstock/fabric, it will have settled after the first inch or two and your image won't be distorted.

    Set your printer up for "BEST" quality. That ensures that you're going to get maximum ink and saturation on the fabric without a "bleed."

    Let the newly printed image set for at least 10 minutes, then iron with a piece of unstarched fabric over the image. MAKE SURE TO USE YOUR IRON ON DRY AND TRY IT OUT BEFORE PUTTING IT OVER THE LABEL TO MAKE SURE ALL THE WATER/STEAM IS GONE. Set it on high heat and iron over it several times with the piece of fabric over it. This "sets" the ink. Let cool thoroughly before cutting and sewing it.

    THE PRINTER I USE:
    I have used inkjets (HPs mostly), but I've had the absolute most resounding success with my KODAK ESP7 printer which uses pigment inks, unlike the inket cartridges. The inkjets will work, but I think the pigment inks are somewhat more lasting.

    (Well, I certainly didn't think I'd go on so long, but perhaps this will help.) Thanks for your time. ~Jo
    are you saying that buying the pretreated fabrics are not necessary? And we don't need the bubblejet solution? We don't have to treat the fabric with all these expensive things?

  25. #50
    Super Member goldendog55's Avatar
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    No, but the printer has to be Epson and use Durabrite or Durachrome inks. Regular printers use a dye based ink and Epson uses a pigment dyed ink. I've made labels with it and they come out so clear and vivid. I bought this when my HP wore out, and I was tired of the high prices of pre-treated fabrics. Here are 2 links about it:
    blog.craftzine.com/archive/.../how-to_print_on_fabric_with_an.html ;
    http://www.linda-matthews.com/printi...-printer-inks/ Judy

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