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Printing on fabric to quilt

Printing on fabric to quilt

Old 08-25-2010, 09:14 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by paintmejudy
Just realize you cannot print on fabric with a laser jet printer, only with an ink jet. My HP prints fabric just fine, in fact have had HPs for years and never had a problem with any of them. Good luck in your search.
Same for me. Just be sure you hand feed each sheet.
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Old 08-25-2010, 09:19 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by Corry
Originally Posted by kat13
I print on fabric all the time. I have a HP Photosmart C4240 and love it! Sorry about your Dad, I made a memory quilt for my Mom when my Dad passed away, it took me awhile to get started on it but then it was such a comfort. I highly recommend HP!
Kat
What do you use to print on? Do you use the fabric sheets that are already treated or do you the bubblejet stuff? Just want to be sure I am going to be using a method that will stand up to washing, etc. I appreciate your advice.
I have used both, the commercial kind and the fabric I treated with bubble jet. I much prefer the material I treated myself because first, I bought a much better quality and thread count, I got a pure white which printed out colors sooooo much brighter and I could fit the pics on the fabric to the size I wanted. Didn't waste fabric that way.
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Old 08-25-2010, 12:36 PM
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i have always used 200ct. muslin or Egyption cotton-something with a real smooth feel. i will cut it a little bit bigger so after it's adhered to the freezer paper, then i can trim it to fit in the printer. one thing i ALWAYS do is cut the freezer paper longer and the fabric to 10 1/2". i then fold the FP over on itself, making sure that the paper covers the edge of the fabric. i then take something and real crease that top edge that feeds into the computer so it won't jam the computer.(ask me how i know it'll do that) i do like to leave it on the Fp for a day or so before i remove it. i make all my quilt labels this way and the only time i've ever had a problem is with the last quilt that i did. i had scanned the fabric so it would blend in the back. well i didn't leave it on the FP for more than 15 min. and the next day i washed it. well the label really faded!i don't know if this was b/c it was Cartridge worlds Ink or b/c i didn't leave it long enough. but most of the time i am very satisfied with the whole process. sorry this is so long.
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Old 08-25-2010, 03:58 PM
  #44  
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It was just last week I discovered a sure-fire method for producing and printing PERMANENT, WASHABLE-WITHOUT-FADING LABELS of any size (up to letter/legal) on ANY quilting fabric (as long as it has been washed first to get rid of the sizing, etc.). Of course you have many font choices through whatever program/word processor you use, but don't forget that you can use colors, add pictures, graphics, etc. . . . whatever you can print, you can put on the label.

Prior to this, I had prematurely put to rest a couple printers and said aloud a whole bunch of words I didn't even know I knew.

HERE'S HOW I DISCOVERED TO DO IT:

You need 1) a piece of cardstock, 2) a can of quilt basting spray, and 3) a piece of washed, ironed (NOT starched) fabric for your label at least as large as the cardstock.

Lay the cardstock on a sheet of newsprint or freezer paper, etc. to catch any overspray. Give it a good spray overall with the basting spray, being very sure to get all the edges, especially the top and bottom edges. Lay fabric on top of the cardstock and smooth out so it's all very flat. Unless you have really "dampened" your cardstock, you shouldn't need to put the cardstock/fabric under a book or anything; just give it a few minutes to be sure it is absolutely dry.

With your rotary cutter, trim the fabric exactly to the edges of the cardstock. Place in your printer in the proper way so the fabric meets the ink cartridges (on mine, as with most printers, the fabric goes in the tray face down and comes out face up with the image thereon).

HERE ARE SOME PRINTING TIPS:

Start your label at least a couple inches down the page. That way, if your printer happens to "hesitate" just a tad when it's grabbing the cardstock/fabric, it will have settled after the first inch or two and your image won't be distorted.

Set your printer up for "BEST" quality. That ensures that you're going to get maximum ink and saturation on the fabric without a "bleed."

Let the newly printed image set for at least 10 minutes, then iron with a piece of unstarched fabric over the image. MAKE SURE TO USE YOUR IRON ON DRY AND TRY IT OUT BEFORE PUTTING IT OVER THE LABEL TO MAKE SURE ALL THE WATER/STEAM IS GONE. Set it on high heat and iron over it several times with the piece of fabric over it. This "sets" the ink. Let cool thoroughly before cutting and sewing it.

THE PRINTER I USE:
I have used inkjets (HPs mostly), but I've had the absolute most resounding success with my KODAK ESP7 printer which uses pigment inks, unlike the inket cartridges. The inkjets will work, but I think the pigment inks are somewhat more lasting.

(Well, I certainly didn't think I'd go on so long, but perhaps this will help.) Thanks for your time. ~Jo
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Old 08-25-2010, 04:21 PM
  #45  
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I bought an Epson printer last time I needed one. With the pigment ink in an Epson, the fabric needs no pretreating. I just use double stick tape and tape the fabric onto a large piece of photo paper, which can be re-used. The ink is a little more, but it is definetely worth the added cost and hassle of pre-treated fabrics, and any fabric can be used!
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Old 08-25-2010, 04:38 PM
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Don't get an hp. Uses too much ink.
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Old 08-25-2010, 04:44 PM
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Originally Posted by goldendog55
I bought an Epson printer last time I needed one. With the pigment ink in an Epson, the fabric needs no pretreating. I just use double stick tape and tape the fabric onto a large piece of photo paper, which can be re-used. The ink is a little more, but it is definetely worth the added cost and hassle of pre-treated fabrics, and any fabric can be used!
No bubblejet needed?
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Old 08-25-2010, 04:46 PM
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No, pigment inks require nothing, except a piece of fabric!
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Old 08-25-2010, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Jo Belmont
It was just last week I discovered a sure-fire method for producing and printing PERMANENT, WASHABLE-WITHOUT-FADING LABELS of any size (up to letter/legal) on ANY quilting fabric (as long as it has been washed first to get rid of the sizing, etc.). Of course you have many font choices through whatever program/word processor you use, but don't forget that you can use colors, add pictures, graphics, etc. . . . whatever you can print, you can put on the label.

Prior to this, I had prematurely put to rest a couple printers and said aloud a whole bunch of words I didn't even know I knew.

HERE'S HOW I DISCOVERED TO DO IT:

You need 1) a piece of cardstock, 2) a can of quilt basting spray, and 3) a piece of washed, ironed (NOT starched) fabric for your label at least as large as the cardstock.

Lay the cardstock on a sheet of newsprint or freezer paper, etc. to catch any overspray. Give it a good spray overall with the basting spray, being very sure to get all the edges, especially the top and bottom edges. Lay fabric on top of the cardstock and smooth out so it's all very flat. Unless you have really "dampened" your cardstock, you shouldn't need to put the cardstock/fabric under a book or anything; just give it a few minutes to be sure it is absolutely dry.

With your rotary cutter, trim the fabric exactly to the edges of the cardstock. Place in your printer in the proper way so the fabric meets the ink cartridges (on mine, as with most printers, the fabric goes in the tray face down and comes out face up with the image thereon).

HERE ARE SOME PRINTING TIPS:

Start your label at least a couple inches down the page. That way, if your printer happens to "hesitate" just a tad when it's grabbing the cardstock/fabric, it will have settled after the first inch or two and your image won't be distorted.

Set your printer up for "BEST" quality. That ensures that you're going to get maximum ink and saturation on the fabric without a "bleed."

Let the newly printed image set for at least 10 minutes, then iron with a piece of unstarched fabric over the image. MAKE SURE TO USE YOUR IRON ON DRY AND TRY IT OUT BEFORE PUTTING IT OVER THE LABEL TO MAKE SURE ALL THE WATER/STEAM IS GONE. Set it on high heat and iron over it several times with the piece of fabric over it. This "sets" the ink. Let cool thoroughly before cutting and sewing it.

THE PRINTER I USE:
I have used inkjets (HPs mostly), but I've had the absolute most resounding success with my KODAK ESP7 printer which uses pigment inks, unlike the inket cartridges. The inkjets will work, but I think the pigment inks are somewhat more lasting.

(Well, I certainly didn't think I'd go on so long, but perhaps this will help.) Thanks for your time. ~Jo
are you saying that buying the pretreated fabrics are not necessary? And we don't need the bubblejet solution? We don't have to treat the fabric with all these expensive things?
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Old 08-25-2010, 05:00 PM
  #50  
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No, but the printer has to be Epson and use Durabrite or Durachrome inks. Regular printers use a dye based ink and Epson uses a pigment dyed ink. I've made labels with it and they come out so clear and vivid. I bought this when my HP wore out, and I was tired of the high prices of pre-treated fabrics. Here are 2 links about it:
blog.craftzine.com/archive/.../how-to_print_on_fabric_with_an.html ;
http://www.linda-matthews.com/printi...-printer-inks/ Judy
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