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Thread: Prob. with seams coming apart...

  1. #26
    Junior Member QuiltingWithMissy's Avatar
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    I have a Bailey and I find some times I tend to push my machine faster than it is build to do. And when I do the stitches do what you are saying yours did.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by aorlflood
    It's not fraying...
    the stitches have come apart for a short area...usually about .5-1" in length. The seam is sewn up to that point and after that point...
    Your thread could be too old, I had this problem with some of the thread I had for years, I threw it out.

  3. #28
    Senior Member kellen46's Avatar
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    Probably it is either aged rotted thread or poor quality thread that is just not holding up to the stress of being in the quilt. Old thread is weak thread. It will rot from sun and time just like any fabric will. Also I do not use Serger thread to piece with as it is just not as strong as regular thread if used singly, it is meant to be used in concert with two or three other threads in a totally different type of seaming. You don't have to spend a lot of money on thread though, the standard brands like Coats and Clark, Gutterman, etc. the kind you find in chain stores is good strong thread. If you sew a great deal and want to really save then go to thread on cones. I buy mine from Newark dressmaker supply, they have a web store. I get some cream, medium gray, and a dark, and that will do for most piecing, But I do buy colors too for machine quilting. Here is how to test your thread, take about an 18 length and get a firm hold on each end. Give it a sharp tug, sort of quick pop, if it breaks it is rotten. Now pull strongly on it, good thread should stretch a little but hold, cheap thread will not. I also invest in Bottom Line thread for the bobbin. It is more spendy but.....it is very fine and will go twice as long in a bobbin than regular thread, it is super strong, you must cut as it will not ordinarily break, the cones are very cost efficient. I buy a light Grey, almost a silver and use it for machine quilting. It just disappears into the back with very little pokies. Remember you are the most important tool in your sewing room and you labor is worth more than any other of the supplies you have. You deserve to have the best fabric and thread you can afford. Cheap thread is no bargain when your wonderful creations fall apart too soon.

  4. #29
    Member hexagonquilter's Avatar
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    the quilt is beautiful. And I love the quilt frame. I would like to have room for a full size frame.
    I have made machine pieced tops and there are holes in the stitching. not really holes but gaps. I have to go over it after it is quilted and washed and do a major repair job. no fun.
    but have found with a hand pieced top no gaps. maybe I am more careful or maybe the thread is better not sure. But I like the quality of hand pieced and hand quilted.

  5. #30
    Pati- in Phx's Avatar
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    Sounds to me like a tension problem. You are using good thread, and I assume that you didn't notice skipped stitches??
    We all know that bobbin and top tension needs to be balanced, and when it is the interlock of the stitch is centered in the fabric sandwich. However, you can have what looks like a great stitch and still have tension problems.

    Are your gaps where you have a cross grain sewn to a lengthwise grain piece? Probably are. Cross grain has some give/stretch, lengthwise doesn't. So if tension is put on the seam the thread can break. (and you really want the thread to break as opposed to the seam line ripping!!!)

    It may be your bobbin tension is not holding well. I recently had that problem. The spring that holds the bobbin in the bobbin case had worn. So I had some real problems with my stitching. Things like bag handles, which I make a lot of, were suddenly having popped seams. Forget trying to get a good stitch on bias edges. and so forth.

    Once I had the bobbin case fixed, the problems went away.

    Hope you find the culprit,
    Pati, in Phx

  6. #31
    Super Member mshawii's Avatar
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    Rather than the whip stitch, use the ladder stitch for closing seams that have come undone. You might be putting too much tension on the fabric, and also the pins might be putting the holes in due to the same extra tension. Just a suggestion.

  7. #32
    Senior Member barbrdunn's Avatar
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    I one time had that happen to a quilt (luckily before it was quilted) and I think that the thread actually melted. Don't remember what thread I used, but either it was poor quality, had too much polyester or my iron was too hot. Have made sure to use only all cotton thread since then.

  8. #33
    Junior Member POosterman's Avatar
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    Thread is a major concern. Make sure it's fairly new and good thread. Also your needle should be changed about every 40 hours worth of work. Make sure the needle is the right size for the cloth your working with. If it was an anywhere problem on the same cloth, I would say you got some poor quality cloth. I always take a little magnifying glass with me to be able to check how close the threads are in the cloth itself. Checking thread count. If it's not good quality higher thread count the seams will pull apart.

  9. #34
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    That is strange. Is the thread of a good quality? Is there something wrong with the eye of the needle or something else ripping the thread apart?

  10. #35
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    I believe I may know why this is happening. If your thread, cotton right? is breaking mid-seam, you may have left the cotton in a sunny place long enough to degrade the cotton in the sun. Sounds strange, but I had to get rid of a bunch years ago for doing the same thing. The side that faces the sun, is weakened by the sun's rays and creates a weakness every so many inches, viola! breaking threads every so often. Do not give the thread away or you are passing the problem on to another. Where are those quiltzillas when we have 'gifts' for them.... :thumbup:

  11. #36
    Senior Member Quilter Day-by-Day's Avatar
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    Beautiful quilt,can't help you with the problem,but I wish you luck in figuring out the problem.

  12. #37
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    The quilt is beautiful, and I am sure the person reciving this gift will be very honored. God bless.

  13. #38
    Super Member katesnanna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by madamekelly
    I believe I may know why this is happening. If your thread, cotton right? is breaking mid-seam, you may have left the cotton in a sunny place long enough to degrade the cotton in the sun. Sounds strange, but I had to get rid of a bunch years ago for doing the same thing. The side that faces the sun, is weakened by the sun's rays and creates a weakness every so many inches, viola! breaking threads every so often. Do not give the thread away or you are passing the problem on to another. Where are those quiltzillas when we have 'gifts' for them.... :thumbup:
    I think this lady is on the right track. Even without the sun, thread can dry out. I put any thread that breaks too easily into the freezer. Leave for a couple of days then put somewhere to defrost. It may not work for poly/cotton but I've had no problem with 100% cotton.
    I have some embroidery thread in the freezer at the moment but am not sure if it will help. If not into the bin.

  14. #39
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    If you used 100% cotton to sew your quilt, how old was the thread that you used? If it was of poor quality or exposed to the sunlight for a long period of time it can be weakened. If you are noticing little holes in the fabric, I would suspect the dreaded moths or silverfish had been at it.

  15. #40
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    I cannot help with the thread problem but I wanted to tell you that I love your use of color with the blue amd red and beautiful work. You are a inspiration.

  16. #41
    Senior Member mzzzquilts's Avatar
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    I was very puzzled when this happened to me in my early stages of quilting. I came to the conclusion that the iron had melted my thread in those places, as I was using the wrong kind of thread, and it was old. Could that maybe be it?

  17. #42
    Super Member aorlflood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elliotsgreatgrandma
    I cannot help with the thread problem but I wanted to tell you that I love your use of color with the blue amd red and beautiful work. You are a inspiration.
    Thanks! I'll post a pic when it is all finished!

  18. #43
    Junior Member brennalee's Avatar
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    i found my serger thread i was using to machine sew with was melting as well, stopped using serger thread and no more problems and no more black gunk on my iron, would never of thought that was it...

  19. #44
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    Your quilt is BEAUTIFUL! I will take it and love it if you want to give it away. Haha.

  20. #45
    Super Member aorlflood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by diane Sneed
    Your quilt is BEAUTIFUL! I will take it and love it if you want to give it away. Haha.
    Thanks, Diane! I do like the way the colors play together so well on this quilt...now, if only the seams would cooperate! LOL

  21. #46
    Super Member Annya's Avatar
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    recently I was quilting a wall quilt and had a lot of problem with the back having all the stitching pulling out. I tried everything,new needle, check tension and eventually found I was using 2 different types of cotton-1-Rasant the other Threadart. Once I put Rasant in the bobbin too the problem was solved. But like the others I would suggest a small ladder stitch for the repairs, the stitches will look like the normal machine stitching. Good Luck.

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