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Thread: Pulling Up Threads

  1. #1
    Super Member Watson's Avatar
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    Pulling Up Threads

    I'm trying to be good and bury threads.

    Obviously, I can pull up the bobbin thread at the beginning, but how do you pull up the bobbin thread when you finish a line of stitching so you can bury it?

    Watson

  2. #2
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    The only reason you pull up the bobbin thread at the beginning is to avoid getting a birds nest on the back. Many people leave the bobbin tails when ending a line of quilting and bury from the back. You can also pull up your bobbin thread at the end the same way you do it in the beginning but it can be difficult if you are one to make several teeny tiny stitches when finishing a line of quilting. You don't need to do that if you plan on knotting and burying so may as well skip the locking stitches and simply pull your bobbin thread to the top by leaving a generous tail and lightly tugging your top thread to coax the bobbin thread to the top.

  3. #3
    Super Member SusieQOH's Avatar
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    When machine quilting I don't bury the threads. I take a few stitches the way Lori Kennedy shows us. It looks like a tiny curlicue.
    If I were entering in a show though, I would bury them.

  4. #4
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I always bring the bobbin thread to the top when I cut my threads. I just hold the top thread, needle down, needle up, give the top thread a tug the bobbin thread comes up. Same method as starting I use for ending. Even after doing a few tiny lock stitches. Then I just clip both threads flush .
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by SusieQOH View Post
    When machine quilting I don't bury the threads. I take a few stitches the way Lori Kennedy shows us. It looks like a tiny curlicue.
    If I were entering in a show though, I would bury them.
    I do the same.
    Always be kind.

  6. #6
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    I am in the pull the bobbin thread to the top at the start and end camp.
    .... CKCowl described it well as to the how to.

    Agree, it is not really necessary, but I tend to wait and do several burials later.
    By bringing it to the top, I know where they are, and it is less likely that the threads will get caught up, tangled, stitched in ... and a mess created, until I do those group burials!
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  7. #7
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl View Post
    I always bring the bobbin thread to the top when I cut my threads. I just hold the top thread, needle down, needle up, give the top thread a tug the bobbin thread comes up. Same method as starting I use for ending. Even after doing a few tiny lock stitches. Then I just clip both threads flush .
    Yes, this is what I do also..... and yes I have tried multiple methods of locking my stitch etc...... but this is the method that I prefer.... it takes a few moments longer.... but I am not in a race, so I enjoy.

  8. #8
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I just cut the ends off and be done with it.
    Another Phyllis
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jingle View Post
    I just cut the ends off and be done with it.
    Same here. I take a couple of back stitches at the beginning and end and then cut them off. I'm not making show quilts and I've never had anyone notice this or had threads come loose.

    Cari

  10. #10
    Super Member Teen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jingle View Post
    I just cut the ends off and be done with it.
    Ditto.......
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cari-in-Oly View Post
    Same here. I take a couple of back stitches at the beginning and end and then cut them off. I'm not making show quilts and I've never had anyone notice this or had threads come loose.

    Cari
    I do this especially for kids' quilts and others when I know the quilt will be machine washed frequently.

  12. #12
    Super Member rryder's Avatar
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    Watson, before you do needle up/down at the end of a line of stitching, if you raise your presser foot and move the quilt back a few inches and then bring it back to where it was, that will give you some slack in the bobbin thread which makes it easier to pull it up to the surface using needle up/down. You just want to make sure you get your quilt back in the spot under the needle so the needle goes in where it was last. Hope that makes sense.

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  13. #13
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    Many threads can be clipped away when lines of quilting start and stop at the edges of the quilt and will be covered by the binding. When they start and stop in the middle of the quilt like to bring the bobbin thread up and hold it to begin the stitching. I later tie and bury that thread. When I stop one of these lines of stitching I pull the work out of the machine fare enough to create a tail of six inches or so and clip front and back. I pull that thread to the back of the quilt, tie and then bury on the back. I try to tie and bury as I go.

  14. #14
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    I use Renae Allen's methods for starting and ending machine quilting.

    https://weallsew.com/secure-stitches...p.mrkSqdhw9gGP

  15. #15
    Super Member running1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by feline fanatic View Post
    The only reason you pull up the bobbin thread at the beginning is to avoid getting a birds nest on the back. Many people leave the bobbin tails when ending a line of quilting and bury from the back. You can also pull up your bobbin thread at the end the same way you do it in the beginning but it can be difficult if you are one to make several teeny tiny stitches when finishing a line of quilting. You don't need to do that if you plan on knotting and burying so may as well skip the locking stitches and simply pull your bobbin thread to the top by leaving a generous tail and lightly tugging your top thread to coax the bobbin thread to the top.
    This is what I do....
    "... let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us."

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